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  1. #1
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    How to build a small backyard mx track?

    I'm not sure this belongs in this forum, but does anyone know if there's a book or online guide to building a safe backyard mx track? It's only 2.5 acres, but it's all I've got. I found a book for building an ATV park, but obviously my property is too small for a whole park.

    Questions I have are: how far to space whoops and doubles (no triples just yet). What kind of incline for a tabletop? Things like that. I suppose I can find out by trial and error, but I'd rather do it right the first time.





    I've only ridden trails so far and wiould like to get some mx time in my backyard before getting in everyone's way at the track.




  2. #2
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    Do you have a D5 or similar dozer? Do you have the 100 to 200 cubic yards of soil that will be required to make jumps and berms? Is your land open or wooded? Are there any land-use or deed restrictions that will prevent you from enjoying your track once it is complete? Do your neighbors like you?

    2.5 acres of open land is plenty of space. Of course if there is a house on that 2.5, that leaves you with about 1.5 acres.



    m y   s i g n a t u r e:


    Formerly RV6Junkie
    A 30+ year student of dirtbiking
    "I've been flapgaggled in the past, and I can say with surety that I did not care for it" - PK

  3. #3
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    No, no dozer but I'm willing to rent a small TerraMite or Bobcat. Yes, the soil is available and in my neighbors yard, but I have no idea how many cu. yds is there. It's a big pile tho. The prop is lightly wooded, mostly flat and rectangular (as opposed to square). No deed restrictions as long as it's for personal use and I don't charge people to use it. All my neighbors have mostly ATV's & some dirtbikes.

    The property backs up to a utility ROW and then to an old quarry so no houses back there. My house is up front and takes up about 1/2 acre.

    Those were great questions!
    Last edited by happytrails2all; 12-01-2006 at 06:25 PM.




  4. #4
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    I built a track in my backyard to keep from looking like a fool out in the real world. Used 40 yds, clay/sand mix and at least another 30 yds. soil scraped from one side of my "yard" and a borrowed uniloader. Had the greatest time building it and hope to add more variety next year. Look up "dirt wurks" or mx track building online. Build your whoops 8 ft. apart. Use a 3:1 pitch or slope on your take-off ramp for jumps.Read all you can,visit other tracks,talk to people and ride what you build.




  5. #5
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    If you rent a bobcat, make sure you get one with tracks.

    I used one this summer to work on our local pitbike track, and it didn't have tracks. Was a real pain trying to pack the jumps. It took about twice as long as it should have.

    I would suggest though, that you get something a bit bigger than a bobcat. They just don't move dirt fast enough for my taste..




  6. #6
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    Look up "dirt wurks" or mx track building online.
    I looked up Dirt Wurx and they have some great tips on their site - I thought I'd pass on the
    link




  7. #7
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    When I made my track I did the following:

    - You first priority should be to keep it safe. No silly jumps, no blind curves, an entry and exit point, no dangerous obstacles (trees, rocks..) that someone can hit if/when they exit the lanes.

    - I layed it out on paper first - that saved sooooo much work. I then took a day to do lay out on the land.

    - All take-off and landing zones are 30 degrees.

    - I built it with 20' to 25' wide lanes - over the years that has turned into 12 to 15' wide lanes with grass between.

    - For safety (because friends will ride there) no gapped jumps. Every jump is a table top.

    - I kept my jumps close to turns. By doing so I know that no one will hit them too fast and that those that really want to catch air had to work for it. All of my friends questioned that move until they realized that they improved their corner speed.

    A track is a lot of maintenance. During the summer I'm sure I spend an hour a week working on it (mowing, grading, killing weeds, collecting stones, trimming trees). Now 4 years old, I've also grown tired of my track - so it's time to layout a new one. There goes another $1,000 for a dozer.




  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndyYZ85
    I would suggest though, that you get something a bit bigger than a bobcat. They just don't move dirt fast enough for my taste..
    I agree. He'll need to deliver the bobcat on a trailer anyway, since you can't tow the track style ones. So why not spend a little more and get a dozer?




  9. #9
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    Try and get an overhead satellite photo to do a layout map, if I recall correctly you can get them free from googleearth.com, but I may not have the name right.

    If you stick with a skid steer instead of a dozer, rent a Case 90XT with tracks and ride control with the biggest bucket they got. This model was designed with digging big holes in mind as opposed to accomodating the 100 plus attatchments available for skid steers. (Gotta help keep the home fires burning! )

    Don't forget to factor in drainiage and watering in your layout.

    Have fun!




  10. #10
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    A track is a lot of maintenance. During the summer I'm sure I spend an hour a week working on it (mowing, grading, killing weeds, collecting stones, trimming trees). Now 4 years old, I've also grown tired of my track - so it's time to layout a new one. There goes another $1,000 for a dozer.
    I didn't want to quote your whole post, but your track sounds awesome! One question - how much property did you have to work with? I looked at my survey and I have an area about 130' x 650' (+-) to work with comfortably.




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