All About Engine Oils

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jaguar

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#3
To double check I spoke on the phone with Joey Cabrera at Motul and he assured me that I was on the right path by thinking that the principle consideration is the final mixed viscosity. He also assured me that viscosity index and flash point are indicators of the quality of the product which is why I used the oils ratings for those two to come up with comparative oil ratings. He was glad to know (but not surprised) that Motul 800 rated #1 in my comparison.
So now here's my video about the subject:
 

jaguar

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#5
Almost all big business is corrupt because what they mostly care about is making lots of money, much more than doing whats right by the customer. This chapter of my story is a case in point. I was shocked at how little “disclosure” has been made by the engine oil makers and so I studied up on the subject of fuel/oil ratios in relation to engine oil characteristics and made a spreadsheet calculator that used an oils viscosity and flash point temperature to calculate the minimum oil needed depending on different factors such as type of riding. Then sharing this discovery on the thumpertalk forum attracted “mototribology” who in his signature says that he only cares about threads talking about engine oils. Obviously to have only one interest in the motorcycling world means he probably has some connection and vested interest in the engine oil business. But that was just speculation on my part. He then started countering every idea I presented about oils I got from my studying the subject and using my logic to come to some conclusions. He even countered a statement I got from his own web site! And he never gave any references to back up his statements. Probably he thought people would believe him since he has a website dedicated to the topic of engine lubrication. But why does he have that site? Is it just because he likes the topic or does he have some monetary interest that would want him to counter my revealing of industry secrets? Well in another thread on the same forum he admitted “Companies like mine and our competitors are not going to tell you the formulas or divulge more information than necessary for the most part. We generally like to keep these things to ourselves.” to which I replied “thank you for being honest to admit you are part of a controlling system that treats people like nothing but a puppet to be manipulated and used as a "customer". That explains why you are acting to confuse the readers here and contradict me although my formula has already proved itself by showing agreement with other recommended ratios. You are otherwise known as a "disinformation agent”.” Then upon looking through his site I found the reason for his wanting to discredit what I’m revealing. He wrote: “My name is Andrew and I am the product formulator and manage the technical aspects of the powersports line for a major lubricant manufacturer.”
http://www.mototribology.com
So he admits his involvement with an oil company and that they want to keep the truth hidden. I’m giving my information to the general public to empower them. Knowledge is power. The fact that he’s come against me is evidence that I’m on to something, especially since he admitted that the oil companies are “not going to tell you the formulas or divulge more information than necessary”.
Now comes the fun part, guessing which company he lies for. Since he jumped right in with full force on that other thread once I said that the H1-R oil of Bel-Ray is not very good then I think he works for Bel-Ray. That sounds about right since I’ve found more technical “discrepancies” with their products than with any other. That and the fact that no where in the H1-R literature does it say it has 1% mineral oil in it but he says their literature does say that. Only someone that works for Bel-Ray would know something that isn’t publicly disclosed. What the safety data on it says is that petroleum derived naptha solvent is less than 1% of the product.
So here are the claims I made which he slyly tried to refute:
1) Oil viscosity is the main aspect of it that enables it to protect engine parts
2) Viscosity Index is high with synthetic oils and low (under 120) with mineral oils
3) Viscosity index should be high in an oil used in a high RPM high heat engine

Another person on that thread said he looked Andrew up on Google and, sure enough, he works for Bel-Ray!
 
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jaguar

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#6
In the engine oil test at http://www.wdarc.org/articles_files/2 stroke Oil Test.pdf the author of the test said that Bel-Ray H1-R does not seem to have combustible oil since it slowed down the test engine until he richened the fuel/air mixture to make up for that loss. So I had the idea of lighting different oils on fire to see which ones produced the biggest flames, with the assumption that those would be the ones contributing more power since they contribute to the combustion flame. The details and conclusions of the test are at http://www.dragonfly75.com/moto/oilpower.html
 
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jaguar

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#8
There are two ways to determine fuel/oil ratio:

1) for race engines that you want the best power from them you just use a lot of oil, close to 32:1 (of any type oil with a viscosity of at least 2 @ 200*C). You also want this ratio for air cooled cylinders to prevent piston noise.

2) for water cooled engines and you are not concerned with absolute best power and are on a budget and just want adequate protection, then you can use my oil ratio calculator to know how high you can go on fuel/oil ratio and still be protected. My calculator bases the ratio of the oils viscosity which is the primary way an oil protects engines parts.

From 65cc to 250cc Honda recommends 32;1 of their full synthetic HP2 oil, and Yamaha recommends 30:1 of their mineral non-synthetic Yamalube 2R oil.

My calculator says Yamalube at 30:1 is good for the tiddlers up to 125cc (reving to 12K RPM) and 34:1 is good for the 250cc reving to 9500. So Yamaha is doing both- recommending lots of oil for good ring sealing (good power) and recommending according to the oils viscosity.

Honda is in over-kill with a high viscosity full synthetic at 32;1 and they could just as well recommend using about 4 other oils that according to their viscosity would better match that ratio. But the HP2 oil is cheaper than they are so the temptation is to stick with it. But consider this- when you use more than what is needed of a high viscosity oil for decent protection then at low and mid range RPM you have more power loss due to viscous friction.

So for owners of water cooled engines the question presents itself if we want to spend more money for best power or use just enough oil for decent protection if we aren't racing.

The method that my calculator uses is that for oils not already plugged into it the user goes to this site and types in the engine oils 40C and 100C viscosities to find out the viscosities at 150C and 200C and then enters those into the spreadsheet. Then by the max RPM and cylinder cooling type the calculator determines the max upper cylinder temperature and the consequent viscosity of the engine oil at that temp (since the viscosity lessens with more heat). Then it determines the fuel/oil ratio needed to have a certain mixed viscosity (diluted by gasoline) on the upper cylinder for ring protection. The idea is that ring protection at the elevated temps there requires the most viscosity of all the engine parts. This method is not far off from what some manufacturers are recommending for the needed fuel/oil ratios. It's a bit "off" only because it's more specific than what they recommend. So in reality the manufactirer recommendations are a bit off because they are too generic. My calculator gives a baseline ratio that can be changed for slightly more oil but shouldn't be changed for less oil to be mixed with gas, especially for ashless and FD rated oils used in competition engines because these oils have little to no ash producing additive which is there as a dry lubricant backup when engine stress is extreme.