CRF 250 using oil

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#17
Regardless of what your friend THINKS, they all use oil for the reasons explained at the begining of this thread.
 
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#18
Rich Rohrich said:
Regardless of what your friend THINKS, they all use oil for the reasons explained at the begining of this thread.
We rode together last weekend at a indoor arena practice,I checked the oil in both bikes at the start and his stayed the same all night(about 2 hours).My oil level dropped on the dip stick.

I guess I will just have to keep a close eye on mine...
 
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#19
Riding style, ring sealing, engine temp and type of oil all enter into the consumption equation. Your bike is likely fine, but it's wise to make frequent oil checks a part of your regular track maintenance just like lubing the chain.
 
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#20
I checked again last night at our local indoor track to see how much oil mine was using now.It seems to be getting worse.In a hour of running time(by my hour meter)it used 150cc's or about 5 ounces.The bike only has 24.6 hours on it,this doesn't seem right.I will be calling my Honda dealer again tomorrow to see what they can do....
 
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#21
MX955 said:
The bike only has 24.6 hours on it,this doesn't seem right.I will be calling my Honda dealer again tomorrow to see what they can do....
He's going to tell you it's time to change the rings, and he will be right. He'll remind you that you've already gone nearly double the recommended service interval.
All single compression ring four stroke pistons use oil even when they are fresh , and they all wear faster the rings faster than the 2 compression ring types.

You might want to write this next part down :

This is NOT AN XR250, so you'd better get used to following Honda's recommended service intervals.

Below is a link to what can happen when you ignore those service intervals. We get a couple of engines like this every week and it happens to all the brands. Food for thought.

http://dirtrider.net/forums3/showthread.php?t=93889
 

Danman

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#22
Does the CRF250X have this single ring design? So an 1 oz per hour is normal and how would that sit for a 4 hour ride (like say an enduro)? Would that put you relay low on oil buy the finish? What is the re-ring intervel. Is it a job that say the average mortal mechaincly apt person is capible of doing?

Is there any options for an aftermarket additional oil tank that would allow you to ride longer without filling up?
 

TexKDX

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#23
Rich - have you had any clutch slippage issues with the Diesel oil in your bikes? I tried Shell Rotella T in two bikes (70s Yamahas) and both slipped the clutch. Switching back to a non-diesel 10w40 made the problem go away.

Is it possible the issue was the temp of the oil, in that the 2 strokes don't heat the oil up as well as the 4 strokes? Both yamahas were vintage trials bikes, so I definately was not generating much heat. Thanks, Leo.
 
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#24
TexKDX said:
Rich - have you had any clutch slippage issues with the Diesel oil in your bikes?

Research has shown that clutch slippage in wet clutch motorcycles is most often caused by varnish buildup on the clutch plates, as well as the normal deposits that come from long term use. Varnish is usually a byproduct of the breakdown of lower grade oils. Switching to a higher grade oil on a worn clutch usually seems to lead to slippage problems.

Changing the clutch usually solves it for good.

I started working with synthetic oils in about 1979 when I built my first air-cooled turbo charged dragbike. This bike saw massive clutch abuse and oil temps that cooked mineral oils, and cam bearings along with it. I started experimenting with Mobil Delvac diesel synthetic oil, in an effort to extend engine and clutch life. Clutch life on the bike was about the same but the engine didn't eat parts anymore. I actually got a chance to wear parts out for a change. :yeehaw:

I've had similar experiences with other projects I was involved in, so I can't say I've ever seen any evidence that diesel specific grades would cause slippage problems.