how tight should chain be

Discussion in '2-Stroke Discussion' started by skipa, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. skipa

    skipa Rookie DRN Member

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    My chain was pretty loose so I tighten it but not sure if I over tightened.it's two finger tight,but when i sit on it, it's tight no play,is that good?


  2. RM85rider123

    RM85rider123 Rookie DRN Member

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    look in your service manual, but the chain should have just a little slack on 2 strokes.
  3. skipa

    skipa Rookie DRN Member

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    no manual
  4. mike109

    mike109 Rookie DRN Member

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    i go by 3 fingers from the top of the swing arm
  5. Ol'89r

    Ol'89r Super Power AssClown

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    NOOOOOOOOOOO! That's not good.

    There is no general rule like the two finger rule that applies to all bikes. The best way to adjust your chain, IMO, is to have someone sit on the back of your seat and compress the suspension ALL THE WAY DOWN. You will notice as the suspension moves through its travel, the chain will get tighter and then looser. When the chain is at its tightest point, adjust it to a minimum of 3/4".

    It is different on different bikes. It all depends on the relation of the swingarm pivot point to the location of the counter shaft sprocket. Some bikes the chain is tightest at the beginning of the stroke and some at the end. Many are tightest in the middle of the stroke. You will have to compress the suspension to see the best point to adjust your chain.

    If your chain is too tight it can cause damage. It can damage the countershaft bearing and in some cases break the countershaft bearing out of the engine case. It can also break the chain and stuff it through your cases.

    It's better to error on the side of being too loose than too tight.

    Also, invest in a manual. It will save you much grief and money over the long run.

    Just my $ .02
  6. wileyE

    wileyE Rookie DRN Member

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    +1 ^, you can usually just lean over the seat, weight it with your chest and pull on the swingarm with one hand and check the chain with the other. Like 89r says, it tightest when the sprocket centers and swingarm pivots all line up. Unless your susp is real stiff or your real light you can compress it that far as I describe. Run it a little looser than normal if your in mud or sticks.
  7. Jaybird

    Jaybird Apprentice Goon

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    This will be when the chain is the tightest on all bikes.
    <a href="http://s29.photobucket.com/albums/c268/Jaybirdmx/?action=view&current=chnsag3.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c268/Jaybirdmx/chnsag3.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>



    You can use a straight edge to measure the sag precisely.
    (downward pressure on chain at measuring point)
    <a href="http://s29.photobucket.com/albums/c268/Jaybirdmx/?action=view&current=chnsag2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c268/Jaybirdmx/chnsag2.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>



    You want 1-3%, of the shaft-to-to-shaft measurement, in total up and down play of the chain, when it is at it's tightest point.
    <a href="http://s29.photobucket.com/albums/c268/Jaybirdmx/?action=view&current=chnsag1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c268/Jaybirdmx/chnsag1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    Take care to keep the sprockets aligned when tensioning. Always double, triple, check things as you tighten back.


    :ride:
  8. 2-Strokes 4-ever

    2-Strokes 4-ever Subscriber

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    Jaybird's advice is real good. Notice how the tension is checked when the countershaft/swingarm pivot/rear axle are in a straight line. You can do this first most important part with a tiedown or two to compress the rearend. Once you've established correct tension, put the bike on a stand and find a reference point for measuring (for an easier future way of adjusting.)
  9. skipa

    skipa Rookie DRN Member

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    Thanks you dudes rock
  10. Redrodent

    Redrodent Rookie DRN Member

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    Thanks Jaybird. That's the best illustration I've ever seen. Just to add, you can also put the bike on a stand and remove a bolt from the lower suspension link. Then you can move the swingarm up and down with ease, by hand.



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