Marty Tripes

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#1
I have a bet with a buddy, that I am sure those of you who frequent this site can answer. Wasnt it Marty Tripes who adopted the style of riding where even in turns, both feet were kept on the pegs. My recollection was that he never, or hardly ever, took his feet off the pegs except in the tightest of turns. Quite an accomplishment considering he weighed more then nmost everyone else out there.
 

kmccune

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#2
I don't know if he invented it, but yes he did keep his feet on the pegs and sat down MOST of the time. I remember the mags talking aout it.

Kevin




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#3
Thats what I thought. Thanks. The guy was the antithesis of todays riders who clamor all over the bikes.
 

dirt bike dave

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#4
He must have had bad knees. Sitting down a lot can be a result of no leg strength due to injury, and not taking your feet off the pegs when cornering will also help protect a bad knee.
 

markthomps

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#5
Yeah, that was Tripes style, although whether you could say he invented it would start up a debate. Tripes was also known as the best rider at finding the hidden "good lines" and preferred to aim for the smoother line over the obvious (rutted) choice. He and Hannah were good buddies and Hannah adopted some of these same mannerisms. Tripes was the better natural talent, but wouldn't train and basically had a could-give-a-damn attitude which is why he bounced from team to team.

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'81 490 Maico (King Kong!), 2000 CR250, 74-1/2 GP400 Maico, buncha street stuff
 
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#6
The ability to take wide smooth lines and and appear slow while lapping everyone else, has long been one of the trademarks of the master rider. If you ever see films of Decoster riding, especially against the Americans, he is boring to watch. The Americans are fish tailing, cutting and thrusting, while he simply looks like he is out for a trail ride on some fire roads. When you inspect what it is he is doing, you'll note that he is lapping everyone and pulling away from the 2nd place man. He seems to choose the same lines as a GP race car driver. I dont know if you would call this European style of riding or not. I know that Rick-Super Hunky-Siemen advocates this approach for all, especially vet and senior riders as it is less tiring. Tripes' dont give a damn attitued was latter shared by Ron Lechien
 

markthomps

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#7
Duke, well don't know that I'd call DeCoster's style boring, but I know what you mean. He was sooooo smooth and always in control. My best memories of his style was against Bob Hannah during the Trans-USA. I especially remember the race at St Joe Missouri, as the two of them were all over each other. Can't remember who won, although I could look it up (nah, the book I need is 3 whole feet away . . .) One of my few remaining brain cells says they each won one moto, but I won't swear to it. I just remember a helluva race where you didn't even pay any attention to who was in 3rd place.



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'81 490 Maico (King Kong!), 2000 CR250, 74-1/2 GP400 Maico, buncha street stuff
 
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#8
I have some video of major MX races both here and abroad. (Gary Semics stuff and another source that escapes me right now). In seeing the way the riders rode their backs back then was true artistry. I have a copy of Brad Lackey's book on how to ride MX. And while somewhat dated, much of it is still applicable. There was no info on how to negotiate doubles since they werent really a concern per se in 1981. That would be moot for me anyway, since even when I dabble in modern MX, I refuse to attempt doubles ( thoughts of my family going hungry while my wife spoon feeds me is too much of a distraction). Lackey's points on braking and attacking turns,etc is still in vogue. The book was ahead of its time. I have had a few youngsters watch me practice and then approach me afterward voicing their intrigue over my riding style claiming that it does appear to be from the old school (70-80's here, not the 60's) I am saved when one of them then interjects, "Yea, but he was still passing people". I have also found the smoother approach easier on the bike.
 

markthomps

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#9
Duke, yeah I've got Brad's book (actually, I bought most of the inventory and sell copies) and consider it one of those real treasures. I remember when it came out, nobody much bought it then, partly becuz it wasn't very well marketed. I especially like the photos of Brad doing wheelies while standing on the seat! And most people think the Brit streetbike guys came up with this first. Hah!

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'81 490 Maico (King Kong!), 2000 CR250, 74-1/2 GP400 Maico, buncha street stuff
 
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#10
Yea, I dont recall much effort in promoting it abck then. But the content has about as much info as a weekned racer can absorb. It satisfies my needs. Besides the pictures of riders from the late 70's to early 80's are great.
 
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#11
Speaking of books, I have one from 1974 called"The technique of Motocross" By Ake Jonsson....Some good Info. in it..cover's about every aspect of the sport for that time period...
 
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#12
I have read that book as well. It too is a little jewel with a wealth of knowledge. Much of it applicable today
 

Zoomer

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#13
Hey Mark, I had Brad sign my copy out at Mid-Ohio last year, He asked me why it was so wore out. I guess from reading it to many times. (didn't help, I'm still slow) He said the new ones have a Suzuki on the front. that the one with the Kaw is from the original book. Any way, saw you in here, though I'd say hi.

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#14
Tripes was about as good as anyone who ever
put a leg over a motorcycle. The problem
was he never trained or cared. I remember
him launching his Honda really high on a
jump at the old Hangtown track in Plymouth
to peek over and see where 2nd place was
on the track. If he wanted to win he won,
which was not often enough. Brad Lackey
learned all he knew about riding from trying
to catch Bob Grossi In Norcal