Rotella T synthetic 5W-40

Discussion in '4-Stroke Discussion' started by YZRIDER00, May 1, 2005.



  1. YZRIDER00

    YZRIDER00 Rookie DRN Member

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    I just got some Rotella T synthetic 5W-40 is it O.K. to run in my 2003 YZ250F. What is the difference this and a motorcycle specified oil. Will it lubricate the top end just as good as a motorcycle oil?

  2. truespode

    truespode Wheelie King

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    It is ok. I use it on occasion.

    Ivan
  3. APBT

    APBT Rookie DRN Member

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    Rotella does not contain molybdenum disulfide and has been reported to be clutch safe by several users.
    Delvac contains a small amount of moly, Delo contains more.
  4. MikeS

    MikeS Lifetime Sponsor

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    15W40 is a better choice when running hard.
  5. YZRIDER00

    YZRIDER00 Rookie DRN Member

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    I think the only Rottela T oil that is 15W-40 is not a synthetic. Should I keep Rottela T synthetic 5W-40 or go to 15W-40 which is a non synthetic? Also what is the difference between 15W-40 and 5W-40? Does the 15W-40 hold up better when the engine gets hotter?
  6. CaptainObvious

    CaptainObvious Formally known as RV6Junkie Damn Yankees

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    Rotella T comes in different blends and grades.

    The Rotella T Multigrade comes in 15W-40 and 10W-30. The 15W-40 is the correct motorcycle grade.

    The Rotella Synthetic comes in 5W-30 and is too light for motorcycle use.

    The Rotella Synthetic Blend comes in 10W-40, 10W-30 and 0W-30. The 10W-40 would be the best choice if you are looking for a Synthetic Blend. The only trouble with blends is that you don't know the ratio. Is it 50% Synthetic or 5%?

    For more info on Shell Rotella go to this web site --> Click Me
  7. JustinC

    JustinC Rookie DRN Member

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    I used the Rotella 5w-40 synthetic all the time when I had my crf250 and never had a problem.
  8. kx137

    kx137 Rookie DRN Member

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    The synthetic diesel oils are 5w-40 oils. Some people concerned that this doesn't match the 10w-40 specs for their engine. The 5w rating only applies when the oil is cold, below about 80° f. Once your oil and engine are up to operating temperature, these are 40 weight oils, just like all the others. In cold conditions, under 40° f, the 5w oils are much better for your engine than a 10w oil.


    These sites along w/ jaybird and bigred's posts helped talk me out of wasting my money on the motorcycle specific oils at the shop. Very good readings here -- http://www.yft.org/tex_vfr/tech/oil.htm -- and -- http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html
  9. Jaybird

    Jaybird Apprentice Goon

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    Spot-on with the explination of the weight ratings, kx137.
    The 5w40 would be fine to use in the bike.
    And as explained, it will not be any thinner oil than a 15w40 will be. Even if it were, it isn't a big issue. In fact, the conventional wisdom of lubrication engineers of late is to use the thinner oils. With advnaces in oil technology, it's found that a thinner oil shows to allow an engine to produce more power, while still being able to effectively protect the surfaces. Although it is still understood that a more viscus, or thicker, oil will provide even better protection, but with a slight compromise of power.

    Diesel oils have more robust additive packages than do auto oils, and most motorcycle specific oils too, for that matter.

    So many rumors and tales. The molybdenum scare is another of those unwarranted rumors passed around. Folks, many motor oils do use molybdenum in their additve packages (MoTDC), as it is one of the absolute best multi-purpose additives available. But, the moly that is used in motor oils is not the same thing as the moly that would be used in chain lubes or rebuild fluids (MoS2).

    The type of moly used in motor oils does not show to cause clutch slippage.
    Matter of fact, most oils that do indeed have "friction modifiers" will not cause your clutch to slip. Most clutches that do slip probably already have an issue that is unrelated to oil choice.

    And when we think about using a full synthetic or a mix, realize that if we are keeping the oil in our bikes long enough for it to matter if the oil is synth or not, we have left the oil in the bike way too long.
    Granted, synthetic is a better choice, due to the fact that it is far better able to keep the oil from going acidic due to heat and degredation. But for the short period of time we should keep the oil in our bikes, it really doesn't matter what type of oil you use. Frequency of change is far more important. Most all off the shelf oils will perform for such a short period. Yes, some have better additive packages and are cleaner fluids, but none warrant the elevated pricing that moto specific oils carry. The moto oil thing is a load of marketing CRAP!

    Yes, I use full synthetic fluids when I can, but it is more of a feel good thing in motorcycles.
    Only if you are looking for extended oil changes should you be completely on board with full synthetics, and steer away from conventional organic oils.
  10. bigred455

    bigred455 "LET'S JUST RIDE"

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    Getting on the topic of friction modifiers,(MOLY)Delo 400 15/40 has a pretty impressive all around package.The moly content in the Delo is around 230 ppm .I switched over from Delvac 1300 which is a awesome oil too for our rides. I am on my 6th oil change with the Delo,there is no issue AT ALL with this so called friction modifiers causing clutch slippage. I am on a RMZ-450 riding in sand and pretty loamy soil conditions.

    4th gear pulls on my 450 which is seldom LOL,my clutch on the 450 is hooking without a hitch in sandy conditions .With the torque of this bike, if the oil was subject to cause clutch slippage I would of noticed it,if my clutch is slipping I AM ON IT! My clutch is hooking and then some, pulls strong like it should, trust me the rpms match the speed!!!!!!!!! I am staying with the Delo. All this talk about friction modifiers,did you know Mobil's mx4t motorcycle oil has more Moly content in it than there new EP oils gold cap for auto's? Also Redline oils that are used in a wet clutch have big doses of Moly,I have never heard any complaint's of clutch slippage with riders using Redline. Motul also uses moly in the make-up of their oils.

    About 5 years ago in the dead of winter I wanted to try mobil 1 10/30 energy conserving oil. I was using the 15/50 RED CAP BACK THEN. I ran the 10/30 in my clutch side on my 00 KX250,loamy soil with a pretty steep 80 yard uphill. I ran this oil all day about 2 hrs worth of riding,the 10/30 performed without any clutch slippage. I am not saying to run a 10/30 oil,I just wanted to point out what you hear or read even from the oil's company spokesman cannot beat the real world test.
  11. kx137

    kx137 Rookie DRN Member

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    Well I went to walmart just the other day and bought 8 gallons of it. Funny thing is that I just purchased my new 06 KX250 and used 01 7.3L Ford Powerstroke diesel just last week. Its nice to consilidate using the same oil for both. Now I just need to find a great forum like this one for my truck :p Thanks again guys, Ill keep everyone informed of my results.
  12. Jaybird

    Jaybird Apprentice Goon

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    Just retired my '94 7.3L turbo.
    325,000 mi.

    Shes' just a young lass yet. Ford and Mobil...hard to beat! :)
  13. john3_16

    john3_16 Rookie DRN Member

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    Yeah the whole myth about the neccessity of using a motorcycle specific oil is one of the biggest marketing scams ever.

    When it comes to regular petro oils your run of the mill oils like castrol/Pensoil/quaker 10W40 that you can easily find at a store nearest you (instead of driving all the way to the shop) is much better than Honda GN4 when you look at the specs and at a MUCH better price...

    You know those labels, "motorcycles are harder on oil, our oil has special additives to help protect the engine better" blah blah...

    Well, they were truthful about one part....The part about motorcycles being harder on oil...However, a virgin oil analysis reveals there is nothing "special" in their oil...Matter of fact there are many diesel and regular car oils out there with comparable and many times much higher amounts of antiwear/acid neutralizing additives....

    If you're gonna use regular petro oil anyway you'll be better off walking right past the GN4 or Kawichem and get some regular car oil off the shelf at your local store and SAVE alot of money.

    A virgin oil analysis is a moto specific oil marketer's worst enemy because the content of their oil is exposed next to regular car oils where the consumer can compare without relying on a company's word about their "special oil"...Snake oil more like it.


    Now, Amsoil and Mobile MX4t make good oils and VOA's reveal that they do have the goods...But, the extra levels of additives aren't worth the extra $4 per quart over a their own synthetic versions of car oils.
  14. Jaybird

    Jaybird Apprentice Goon

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    The oil industry as a whole are not really crooks. I feel they are simply taking advantage of marketing tactics in many cases.

    But, in defence of the oil mfg's, some additives that are placed in motor oils are not detectable in a coventional oil analysis. Some propriatary (top secret) additives may show up as other types of chemicals simply due to their molecular makeup.
    Others simply don't show...or aren't looked for with conventional analysis.

    Antimony TCD is probably one of those good additives that does not reveal itself in the tests.
    Sometimes the virgin oil analysis is not the best way to judge between two oils. Often times the used analysis of both oils will prove to provide the best information.

    Also...a buttload of barrier additives cost very little money per qt. to add.
    Nothing I've seen would warrant the increase of price you see on these boutique moto specific oils.
  15. J.B.426

    J.B.426 Subscriber

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    I was using Mobil 1 15w50 and am now using Shell Rotella T syn 5w40 in both the tranny and engine side of my CRF450. It's a good choice for either and offers good performance, value, and availability.
  16. GhostRider32

    GhostRider32 Rookie DRN Member

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    I use Rotella T 5w40 synthetic in my FZ1 sportbike and it is fine. I actually had Blackstone Labs do a oil analysis at 2200 miles on the oil and the report showed everything was fine and they actually told me to run the oil much longer due to the additive package was still in excellent shape.

    Granted, it is a streetbike but it does see 11,000 rpm's to 11,500 rpm's (redline) several times a week and a whole lot of 5000 to 8000 rpm use. I figure if it takes that kind of abuse and is still great at 2200 miles, a couple of days use in a dirtbike should be ok too. I'm changing to it in my KX next time I change the oil in it.
  17. oldgoat

    oldgoat Rookie DRN Member

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  18. Barbarian

    Barbarian Rookie DRN Member

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    wal-mart brand 10W-40. Cheap, non-energy conserving, and gets changed regularly.
  19. Rich Rohrich

    Rich Rohrich BioHazard

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    ... note to self, don't buy a used four-stroke from this guy. ;)
  20. truespode

    truespode Wheelie King

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    I know Barbarian and I can attest to the fact he takes care of his bikes. He may use inferior oil, IMO, but I am very confident he changes it enough and does all the other service intervals correctly that it isn't a problem.

    I have seen others use higher quality oil but not take care of the rest of the bike as well.

    Barbie ;) is pretty good with the mechanic type thingy and can ride a wheelie forever.

    I would not hesitate buying one of his used race bikes.

    Ivan
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