Suzuki RM370 (Not sure what year)

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#1
Hi All,

I'm asking for some advice. I have this "vintage" dirt bike in my basement. I'd like to get rid of it, is it worth anything? Obviously, it doesn't run and was taken somewhat apart for a rebuild project. Photos attached! Has all the plastic left and exhaust that is not pictured.
 

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dirt bike dave

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#2
The RM370 was built in '76 and '77. The RM400 came along in '78.

The swingarm on yours looks a little more modern than the '76, so I'd guess the bike is a '77.

Here is a link that has some magazine tests, brochures and advertisements.

http://www.suzukicycles.org/RM-RMX-series/index.html?RM370_brochures.shtml~isoraami

It was a good bike in its day and the introduction of the RM line was a big step up for Suzuki. That one's pretty rough. I have no idea of value, probably not much and whatever someone would pay for a parts bike.
 
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#3
Thanks for the info and link, much appreciated! I'm getting mixed reviews elsewhere..... I've got a couple people saying it's a rare find and to keep it! Hmmmmm
 

dirt bike dave

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#4
I really have no idea on value.

If it was pristine, no doubt it would be collectible. It's just so expensive to restore an old bike, so it is rarely feasible for someone to buy a rough one. But people do get passionate about their motorcycles, so you never know.

Edit: I see you have the plastic and pipe, and that certainly helps that it is so complete.
 
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#5
they are a lil rare but not worth big money
the motor would be great for a shifter cart project :cool:
part it out on ebay
 

_JOE_

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#6
It's rare for any dirt bike to survive 30+ years and still be in one piece. Some don't make it 10 years without being hacked up, lol. That being said, it IS a dirt bike. There's a chance you might find someone to pay good money for it after restoration, but most people would rather spend thousands on a modern bike. It takes so much time to do a proper resto that your time loses any real value.
 
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#7
I'm amazed at how little rare vintage dirt bikes are worth sometimes. For instance if you have a pristine 73 CR250M Elsinore, you might get $4,000-$10,000. Still in a shipping crate unopened, you might get $20,000. But most of these old bikes bring $1,500 - $4,000 max, if completely restored and looking like brand new. And it is very easy to put more money into the restoration than you'll be able to sell the bike for when done. And as Joe pointed out, don't even bother to put a price on your time, or you'll lose money the first week you're working on it. But let's face it, we keep these bikes because they are cool, we have a soft spot for memories of our youth or because we just plain enjoy working on them or riding them. If it were mine, I'd probably attempt to rebuild the engine (if you think you have close to enough parts to get it running again), gussy it up a bit with a coat of paint where necessary and ride it. Before spending a dime, though, I'd inventory what it might need. Then start doing some 'bay and other research to see if there are enough parts available at a price to make it worth your while. Sometimes, these old bikes are just not worth rebuilding for lack of a crankshaft, con rod or even an odd size piston or bearing that is difficult to find these days.
 

Uchytil

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#8
Investment or quick rollover?

I restore 70's dirtbikes and have a modicum of negotiating skills, and I can tell you it's not an easy way to make a buck. I do it out of love;). You could put it on CL or EB in the whole and get a little spending cash, or go long term, tear it down and sell parts. Even the engine can be reduced to parts for maximum worth. Restoring does not equal cash gain. You lose money big time. Check out the markets and see what I mean. BTW, RM parts, particularly crankshaft/rod sets are very hard to find in good shape. That alone may fetch more than the whole!
 
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#9
AK, the forks say '76, and the '76 & the '77 came with the same steel swing arm that was painted black. The alloy arm, which was a twin as far as dimensions go, was unpainted aluminum. You have a '76 RM370A.
 
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#10
1977 Rm370

Hi,
There are a couple of differences between th 76a and 77b.
1 The B has a longer frame rail on the left side to accommodate the bigger muffler.
2. The B has remote reservoirs on the rear shocks.
3.The B has a square section swing arm and the A has a round section swingarm.
4.The B has different port timing ,2 more horsepower the A barrel has a small hole above the exhaust port, used to lower the compression at kick starting speeds .
The rear axle is different due to the different swing arm.
The fuel tank is a little different one has the fuel cap in the centre one is offset I can't remember which is which.
I race a 77B in vintage MX in Australia I have another bike (77) about the same as yours as a parts bike , I paid $1000 Oz for it I paid $3000 for the one I race.
My mate has a 76A
Yours is a 77 B
I hope this helps
 

dirt bike dave

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#11
kubasaki1978@gmail said:
AK, the forks say '76, and the '76 & the '77 came with the same steel swing arm that was painted black. The alloy arm, which was a twin as far as dimensions go, was unpainted aluminum. You have a '76 RM370A.

IIRC, the 370B has similar forks to the 370A and 250A. The 250B and 125B got the forks where the tubes extended further below the axle.


Oh, and excellent info, Djob!
 
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#12
Yeup, I was going to say 76'...is it restored now?