XR600R vs. XR650L

Discussion in 'Dual Sport | SuperMoto | Adventure' started by 40, Sep 24, 2003.

  1. James

    James Lifetime Sponsor

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    We probably agree more than we disagree. :confused:

    That said, the intended application being 50% street riding and moderate trail riding for the other 50% (I assume) would lead me to believe that the difference between these two carbs, *if properly jetted*, is a MINOR issue. In my case, there is no difference. I have the 600R carb on mine but it didn't become a 600R. I do plan on just putting the 600R engine in it one day and that should fix it.

    The butterfly throttle is nearly identical to the butterfly choke flap that occupies your 600r/650r carb so I think that is a moot point. Also, the Honda CV carb is manually actuated for approx. the 1st third of its travel....so while I can understand the concern or misconception about the so-called "wait", I have never had a problem with it on or off road once the carb was setup properly. I admit that I have not done 0-60s or 45mph roll-on time trials and that this just comes from 2 years of seat time on this particular bike as well as some serious carb swapping about two months ago.

    I can't speak about the DRZs as I haven't ridden those enough to know nor do I know exactly how their CV carb works. Are you talking about the two different carbs on the same bike or DRZ-S vs DRZ-E? I am strictly comparing two different carbs on the same bike. If you are comparing E to S and even modded versions of each....you are correct, the E should walk all over the S.

    But I will agree that I wouldn't want a CV carb on the motocross track and I can see why you wouldn't want it on your trials bike.



    You're welcome :thumb:
     
  2. James

    James Lifetime Sponsor

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    To more spicifically answer 40s question:

    If I had my choice of just these three, with no hassles registering and licensing it:

    50% in town and non-interstate riding, and planned to do any SERIOUS (Tight, Rocky, hill climbs, damaging falls) off road riding, I would go with the 600R.

    Faster, open terrain, good deal of interstate/high speed street riding, 650R.

    Living in NC stuck with NCDMV and probably can't have dual sported bike anyway - 650L
     
  3. motometal

    motometal Lifetime Sponsor

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    I was told once that the clutch on the L has a cush drive built into it (which isn't fitted on the other models).  Since I haven't ever had it apart, I can't confirm this.

    Regarding the countershaft spline problem, I bet in almost every case you will find that someone has fit a cheap aftermarket countershaft sprocket, which (due to poor or no heat treatment) quickly starts to loosen up and wear out on the spline, then it proceeds to wear the countershaft itself.  My bike had this problem, but I caught it in time, but had to reverse the sprocket and shim it up to engage the inboard section of spline that isn't worn.

    On the stock L carb, needle adjustability isn't that bad-just shim it up!  That being said, I think there is another problem with the needle.  I suspect the diameter needs to be a bit smaller to allow richer mixture at low throttle openings.  There seems to be a lean spot between idle (fuel screw) and half throttle (needle clip/level).  Richening up the fuel screw won't cure the problem.

    Has anyone experimented with the cam mechanism that forces the slide open?

    With a flat top piston, DG rcm exhaust, and all the usual uncorkings and jetting, my bike runs pretty good but still has a bog if you goose the throttle at low rpms.  I suspect a different diameter needle may help, but a pumper carb is probably the REAL solution.  Otherwise, at higher RPMs and/or conservative throttle openings, throttle response is quite startling, considering we are talking about the Buick Electra equivalent of the dirt bike world (4" bore!) fitted with a CV carb!


    Regarding the suspension, it's pretty crude but can be made to work fairly well, the weak spot on mine is whoops or stutter bumps-that's where modern suspension technology has a real edge.  With stock springs and minor adjustments, the L can handle some pretty big jumps.  Mine now has a lowering link, which works great for street or racing on paved courses.  The $100 was a bit steep, but to me it was worth it (mine is the '93 model which had an even taller seat ht. than the other year models').  I haven't tried any large jumps since the link was installed because now the front of the bike has been lowered and it would bottom out on the fender.  Stock, the rear spring is very stiff and the forks are soft.


    Sorry the thread got off track here, lots of good specific discussion.

    I'm sure other owners of the L can relate that it's a big, heavy, tall, underpowered pig, but for some reason with 4 bikes in the garage I have feelings for this bike unlike the others.  It's just a great bike!  Not an ideal bike for any one purpose, but way more flexible than most.  People complain about the small fuel tank, because they are having so much fun they don't want to stop riding!
     
    #13 motometal, Nov 2, 2003
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2003
  4. ajshrum

    ajshrum Rookie
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  5. ajshrum

    ajshrum Rookie
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    How much horsepower would an 84 XL600R put out stock. It has a hot cam kit and supertrapp muffler in addition to a new top end.
     
  6. serge

    serge Member
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    great old thread with lots of useful info !! I am glad I found it!
     

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