1967 Triumph TR6C Rebuild by a noob.

Ol'89r

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#46
You will need the clutch hub puller to get the clutch off. Part # 61-7014. I can have one shipped to you if you want. Be sure to loosen all of the nuts before taking anything else apart. (Clutch nut, engine sprocket nut, pinion and cam gear nuts.) Cam gear nuts are reverse thead. May I suggest you download a parts book for your year model. The exploded view in the parts book will help you see how they go back together. You can download one at www.britishonly.com/technical.library. British only has their parts department closed for an extended vacation right now but you should still be able to access the tech library.
Without the puller you can take the clutch apart piece by piece but the last piece is very fragile and will break using a regular gear puller. Best to have the OEM puller.
 
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#47
Cool thanks. I’ve already got the parts books and shop manuals , and I *thnk* the clutch hub puller. I’ll let you know.

Cant get to that tech library.

Are you saying to loosen everything before pulling the motor? Ie; it’ll be easier with it bolted down?
 

Ol'89r

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#48
Yes, loosen everything first. I will see if I can find another link for the tech library. The puller in your pic (Center front) looks like the clutch hub puller.
 
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#49
Alright... that's as far as I can go without the clutch plate tool and the primary puller. Stator/rotor are off, clutch is apart but the basket is still there.

I'll probably pause here until after the holidays. There's plenty to keep me busy until then just cleaning stuff.

eb8d13fb-1b57-4049-9c0a-2d89f3faa6d9.jpg
0544820a-d29d-434e-93c7-3c06377b9989.jpg
 
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Ol'89r

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#50
You can make the clutch holding tool by welding or bolting a friction plate and a steel plate together. Or weld a handle on to the steel plate to hold on to. You will probably need to replace the friction plates anyway and a steel plate doesn't cost much. Be sure to surface your steel plates using a piece of emery sand paper and a flat surface. Like glass.
 
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#51
Not a great day!
Started cleaning it up for disassembly...

I discovered a case repair on the primary side. Looks like the primary chain must have slapped/snapped or something?? It doesn't look to be from wear (loose chain), there was def. impact of some kind. Broke a piece of the casting inside by what appears to be an oil outlet just above the clutch (hole is still there and appears unaffected.

From the outside I noticed the piece welded in due to the difference in surface texture. Inside the bead is obvious. Looks like they did a good job, but...

So then, I'm looking over everything closely, and I find a hairline crack in the case above the drive sprocket. I'll attach pics of each. Since it's near the other damage, I guess it could be from the same problem, but no idea.

I cleaned and went over the frame today as well... didn't find anything, but will go over it in more detail tomorrow.

I'll go ahead and assume this will kill collectible value. The question is, should I continue with the rebuild or just check / replace the trap and put it back together?

That sure took the wind out of my sails!

Pic #1 . welds / inside casing damage

ff46a437-2135-4c12-9cdd-498c341bb7c3.jpg

Pic #2 Hairline crack above drive sprocket.

1575683876513.png

Pic #3 location of crack for ref.

crack.jpg
 
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Ol'89r

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#52
Not a great day!
Started cleaning it up for disassembly...

I discovered a case repair on the primary side. Looks like the primary chain must have slapped/snapped or something?? It doesn't look to be from wear (loose chain), there was def. impact of some kind. Broke a piece of the casting inside by what appears to be an oil outlet just above the clutch (hole is still there and appears unaffected.

From the outside I noticed the piece welded in due to the difference in surface texture. Inside the bead is obvious. Looks like they did a good job, but...

So then, I'm looking over everything closely, and I find a hairline crack in the case above the drive sprocket. I'll attach pics of each. Since it's near the other damage, I guess it could be from the same problem, but no idea.

I cleaned and went over the frame today as well... didn't find anything, but will go over it in more detail tomorrow.

I'll go ahead and assume this will kill collectible value. The question is, should I continue with the rebuild or just check / replace the trap and put it back together?

That sure took the wind out of my sails!

Pic #1 . welds / inside casing damage

View attachment 20785

Pic #2 Hairline crack above drive sprocket.

View attachment 20786

Pic #3 location of crack for ref.

View attachment 20787
It's your lucky day. I can fix that for you. It's one of the things I do in my shop. The photo below shows a few other tools I use. #2 is a home made tool for removing and installing the clutch springs. If you have the tool kits with the bikes you should have tool #1. It is a tire tool and also a clutch spring tool on the other end. #3 is a homemade tool for removing the screwed plug that holds the sludge tube in. If you make one, make sure it fits the screwdriver slot tightly and use an impact driver to remove it. #4 is a 9/16 X 18 tap used to remove the sludge tube. I drop a short piece of rod(#5) into the sludge tube (#6) and run the tap down the tube. The rod bottoms out and draws the sludge tube out of the crank. Be sure to drill out the center punch on the screwed plug and heat the crank before trying to remove the plug. That other tap that I posted in the last tool pic is a 1/2 X 14 NPT used to draw out the camshaft bushings on the L/S case. Are we having fun yet???
 

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#53
It's your lucky day. I can fix that for you. It's one of the things I do in my shop.
Sweet... I'll get that casting off to you asap.

Edit #1 Dec 12, 2019
FYI: ol'89r advises that he can fix the case; the hairline crack, clean-up the welds inside as well as re-texture the outside of the case to match the original surface. I had no idea that could be done and was bumming about the the area having been sanded smooth and making the repair obvious. Yes!

#3 is a homemade tool for removing the screwed plug that holds the sludge tube in
What did this begin life as?

#1 & #2 ... I have a tool for the clutch springs.

#4 is a 9/16 X 18 tap used to remove the sludge tube.
So the sludge tube has no bottom? I'm not getting how it backs-out otherwise ... the tap pushes the rod, and pulls the tube as it's cutting threads/screwing in, but unless the rod is against the crank itself (ie; hole in the bottom of the sludge tube) I don't get how it's pushing the tube out?... looks like my noobness is showing. I'll cross that bridge when I get there.
 
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Ol'89r

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#54
#3 was a 1/2" to 3/8" adapter ground down to form a screwdriver to fit the slot in the plug. It has to fit tightly. The sludge tube is open on the other end. When you screw the tap in, it pushes against the rod and the rod pushes against the crank and draws the sludge tube out. Be sure to remove the flywheel bolt that holds the sludge tube in. I will send you my address in the Mod forum so you can ship the cases.
 
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#55
Thanks for that Terry ... I assumed the sludge tube was only open on one end. I've seen a few videos on this now and the method you describe here makes the most sense.
 
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