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Bell-Ray oils

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#1
My local shop sells Bell-Ray transmission oil and gear oil. One was labelled 75w, the other was 80-90w. Both had the hydraulic fluid look to them, and I was wondering if the different labelling wasn't just a marketing strategy (possible for thumpers) or if there is actually a difference (other than viscosity)? I asked the parts guy and he didn't know. Anybody know? Thanks
 
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#2
Don't buy that expensive stuff to run in a gear box, run regular 90w gear oil found at your local automotive dealer or Castrol 20 w 50. I've used both and too this date I have never had probs from clutches or gears and have been riding since the mid 80's.
 
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#3
I've run regular 90w (the thick stuff) in the lower unit of an outboard motor, but never in the tranny of a dirt bike. I was just curious if the Bel-Ray labelling was simply a marketing strategy.
 
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#5
I use the Bel-Ray 75 in all of my 2-strokes, with good results. Don't the bothered by the fact that it is dyed red. I have heard of people using Dexron III, ATF, 80wt gear oil, standard motor oil, and probably a few other things. Of those options, I would recommend the gear oil, but make sure that is is compatible with limited slip diferentials because your clutch lives in the stuff too. The auto transmission stuff also makes sense because there are friction bands and gears in an auto tranny. Manual transmissions and car engines don't have the need for the friction agents, so I don't feel that their lubricants are appropriate for a motorcycle transmission.
 

_JOE_

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#6
FruDaddy said:
Manual transmissions and car engines don't have the need for the friction agents, so I don't feel that their lubricants are appropriate for a motorcycle transmission.
Many modern manual transmissions use atf as the lubricant.
 
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#7
_JOE_ said:
Many modern manual transmissions use atf as the lubricant.
Maybe true, and many automatics will eventually fail it ATF is used.

Using the lube and needing all of it's properties are different animals. What is the old saying? "Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it". My point is that a manual transmission fuid, such as 90wt gear oil, is not appropriate for a motorcycle transmission because it does not contain the agents necessary for the clutch. In this regard, I couldn't care less what some automobile manual transmissions require, except to say that it probably shouldn't be dumped into a motorcycle. Besides, the modern manual transmission is a passenger vehicle is all but dead anyway so I find it hard to say that many are still being produced (I attribute that to lazy drivers, but this is also irrelevant here). And mine takes straight 90.
 

Jaybird

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#8
Aren't you simply making assumptions about what is in what?

Or maybe you could explain to us just what "friction agents" you are talking about?
 
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#9
I can assure you that there are additives in lubricants intended to have clutches, or other friction devices, submerged in them. This is why there are different types of gear oil, some for open differentials, and others for limited slip. If you use a lubricant without the proper additives in a limited slip differential, the clutches in it will not work properly. Unfortunately, I am not a chemist, and I cannot identify my sources at this time, as I have gained my information from magazines that I have read over the last 10+ years. Perhaps somebody more knowledgeable will come along and clarify the differences in fluids. If you want to save money buying a lubricant that isn't designed for a dirt bike, then feel free, but you are doing so at your own risk. If you search these forums, then you will have the opportunity the read the opinions of others here on various options.

My only assumption is that the oil companies have people, who are far knowledgeable than I am, deciding exactly what needs to be put into the bottle so that their product will do its job and I will buy more of it.

Research your options on your own, and don't expect somebody else to tell you what to do. If you do that, then you don't need to cite your sources, but you do need to know how reliable your sources are before you choose to trust them. Lastly, you don't know me, or my background, so you should take anything I say and look it up for yourself anyway (this goes for all internet sources). Just because I say the sky is blue doesn't make it so, you should walk outside and see for yourself.
 
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#10
showtime586 said:
My local shop sells Bell-Ray transmission oil and gear oil. One was labelled 75w, the other was 80-90w. Both had the hydraulic fluid look to them, and I was wondering if the different labelling wasn't just a marketing strategy (possible for thumpers) or if there is actually a difference (other than viscosity)? I asked the parts guy and he didn't know. Anybody know? Thanks
Bel-Ray Gear saver for 2-stroke trannies comes in 75 and 80W and is labled for 2-stroke transmissions. Either will work fine. The 80-90W sounds like their Hypoid Gear oil which is for differentials (shaft drive bikes). Its very thick and would not work in a transmission.

The bottles look the same; but the labeling will be different. As long as you get the Gear Saver for 2-stroke transmissions you will be happy. Have used it since the late 1980's.
 
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#11
DL- Both bottles looked very similar, but the next time I go back to the shop, I'll get the bottle for two stroke trannies and look closer at the bottle labelled gear oil to see if it is thick. Thanks
 
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#12
showtime586 said:
DL- Both bottles looked very similar, but the next time I go back to the shop, I'll get the bottle for two stroke trannies and look closer at the bottle labelled gear oil to see if it is thick. Thanks
Yes, the coloring/design/labels is the same, just the text about whether its the Hypoid Gear oil or for 2-stroke transmissions. Both are called Gear saver.. It can be very easy to grab the wrong one. Its also confusing because of the way the rate gear oils. The 80 W gear oil is about like a 10W-30 but 80 W Hypoid gear oil is closer to molasses. :coocoo:
 
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#13
DL,

The 80-90w is definatley called Hypoid gear oil, but it isn't the thick variety. The viscosity is only marginally different than the 75w tranny oil.
The 80-90w gear oil that i used to put in my outboard lower unit was very thick, and had an unpleasant smell.
At any rate, I got the 75 tranny oil.
 

_JOE_

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#14
showtime586 said:
DL,

The 80-90w is definatley called Hypoid gear oil, but it isn't the thick variety. The viscosity is only marginally different than the 75w tranny oil.
The 80-90w gear oil that i used to put in my outboard lower unit was very thick, and had an unpleasant smell.
At any rate, I got the 75 tranny oil.
Good. As far as I know the main problem with non-bike-specific lubes is clutch slippage. Other than that they all do basicallt thsame thing. They lube bearings and provide a barrier between gears. I'm sure there are some other minor differences. Most owners manuals recommend like 10-30 or 10-40.