chains

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#1
I'm ignorant to chains. What should I replace my stretched out stocker with. (03 KDX 200). O-ring? Non O-ring? Here's what I'm looking for. A better than average quality chain, that won't break the bank. Also, a durable chain. I'm not too concerned with the "power robbing" effect of heavy chains. Thanks.
 

CaptainObvious

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#2
I've used roller and o-ring chains. Although I am using an o-ring right now, I'd actually have to suggest a very high quality roller chain. Keep it cleaned and oiled and it will last a long time. O-ring chains are a little more forgiving of bad maintenance, but in the end will seize do to dirt and/or corrosion. The real advantage of an o-ring chain is that they don’t stretch much. But after initial break-in, a quality roller chain will require little adjustment.

If you take good care of the chain, why give up power and performance to the drag of an o-ring chain.
 
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#3
I disagree about o-rings stretching. They do like crazy until they get worn in. I have an EK O ring and for the first 5 rides, I had to adjust the chain tension. Now it is fine, but a few links are stiff. Overall I am not happy with it. The RK O ring chains are a better unit which my friend runs presently.

Personally my boss at work (x factory race mechanic for FMF, Honda, etc) uses the EK 520MRD with lightening holes in the side plates. He has run the same chain in the track on his 42hp YZ250F for 3 years now. HEre is what EK states on the chain: "Patented lightening holes in the sideplates allow EK to use larger pins and thicker sideplates without increasing chain weight, while maximising strength and durability."

I just bought a 428 chain for the wifes TTR125 and that 520 chain is the same weight. Pretty impressive. They are like $70 retail and have the gold colored plates.
 

CaptainObvious

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#4
Originally posted by RV6junkie
The real advantage of an o-ring chain is that they don’t stretch much. 
That's what I said! I didn't say they don't stretch at all.

BTW, if you have even one stiff link in a o-ring chain, the chain is shot. Replace it now or you will be ording sprockets soon too.
 

Jaybird

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#5
First, both o-ring and non-o-ring chains are roller chains. They are essentially identical items, except the the ring chain has an o-ring placed over the pins on both ends.

Most all of your top shelf chains today go through a "proof stretching" process during mfg'ing that places approx 60% of the total rated pull on the chain. This procedure will stretch the plates out and let them find a home.
Contrary to some's belief, chains do indeed stretch before any wear at all takes place. This lengthening is called "initial stretch". Until mfg's started proof stretching chains, the intial stretch would occur during the first hour or two of hard riding and immediate adjustments were called for. This is pretty much a thing of the past. If you have a chain that is growing fast, and it has been proof stretched at the factory, then you have either an adjustment (most likely), a cleaning, or a lubrication problem.
Even if the chain hasn't been proof stretched, you probably are not seeing initial stretch if you have to adjust mucho. Other than the side plates elongating ever so slightly, a chain does not "wear in" unless it is of very low quality with poor tolerences.

I have to agree on the standard chain being the best all around choice for most of our riding. A ring chain should be mounted when you ride in the slop all day, but remove it and put the standard back on the rest of the time.

Folks get too used to thinking their ring chain is maintenance free, until it does indeed have at least one reel frozen up. And as described, the sprockets will go fast at that point. You will rarely see a standard chain, that is well maintained, do this. A ring chain that is taken pristine care of can and will do this. It's a matter of not being able to always protect the rings from damage. Once one ring is violated, the chain and sprockets are on a downhill slide.

Matt....are you sure the MRD is the one with the holes? Did you see this chain?
I'm fairly certain the MRDL and MRD's don't have the lightening holes. I think those are on the grand prix chains by EK, maybe the RX series.
 
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#6
I will double check at work the exact name on Tuesday. Searching the internet, that was the models posted with the lightning holes.
 

CaptainObvious

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#7
Sorry Jaybird, I should have said "o-ring" and "non o-ring" - which I guess we can call "standard". Now I'm confused!
 

Jaybird

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#9
RV6, standard would be the correct term for a non-ring chain. Both standard and o-ring chains are "roller chains".

Jason, it is absolutely fine to pressure wash a standard roller chain. If you use a thick nasty lubricant after, you definately want to get the water off your chain first by using some sort of water dispersant prior to lubing.

Pressure washing an o-ring roller chain is a bad idea. The high pressure streams can displace and tear the rings. This allows water and contaminates to enter the protected area's. Great care must be taken with a ring chain to ensure you get good service out of it. You want to keep it lubed just as you would a standard roller chain, as there are friction area's not protected that need lube, and the rings themselves need lubricant to remain supple.
 
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#11
....I dunno, but this spring I put on a PartsUnlimited 520 O ring, cause it was the least expensive oring I could find. Only had to adj. once for inital strech after the 1st ride....and that was 6mos. ago....the beauty of an oring is you dont have to oil it and therefore it doesn't get dirt all caked up on the chain....not a single link is tight, and I check it the wkend....anyways, good luck.
 

CaptainObvious

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#12
Originally posted by nectar
the beauty of an oring is you dont have to oil it and therefore it doesn't get dirt all caked up on the chain
Oh no nectar, now you've done it. Stand by for Jaybird's wrath. :laugh:
 

RTL

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#13
Originally posted by RV6junkie


Oh no nectar, now you've done it. Stand by for Jaybird's wrath. :laugh:
No Wrath fellas, just a professional spreading the knowledge. :thumb: I for one appreciate Jaybirds chain responses. Bring it on... :worship:
 
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#14
thanks guys, this thread has been pretty helpful. i think i'll try a good non-o. Any favorites?