fuel iniection for 4 stroke

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Sep 29, 1999
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#1
do you think fuel inection will replace the carbs on new 4 stroke engine?it seem japanese (honda) want to introduce it on every model maximum for 2010.
only gas gas use it but it seem for offroad it gi a flat range of power.no hit.
maybe for mx bike carburetors still perform better.
any news on this on US?
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2001
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#2
Cannondale bikes and quads used it with great results. "jetting" furel air mix could be set from a laptop or hand held PDA. Look for more and more 4 stokes to go EFI. If there is any future in 2 strokes, it will probably be direct fuel injection, no more 2 stroke oil as is done by Bimota.
 
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#4
Aprilia has had a 50cc out for awhile they call it DITCH (Direct Injection Technology) Fuel consumption is down 40% lubricant consumption is down by 50% emissions are down by an 80%
 
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#5
Originally posted by kx200
Aprilia has had a 50cc out for awhile they call it DITCH (Direct Injection Technology) Fuel consumption is down 40% lubricant consumption is down by 50% emissions are down by an 80%

Sounds like a two stroke injection system...
 
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#6
The Bimota bike pretty much sunk the company and they never got it to work right with the direct injection. They ended up slapping a pair of carbs on it.
Hmmm, kinda like Cannondale aye?
A snipet from the net about the bike below.

Bimota chose the Bologna show to reveal their revised VDue. The 500 cc two-stroke V-twin has not lived up to expectations, primarily due to problems with the fuel injection system. Those lucky (or unlucky, as the case may be) enough to ride it found the machine a very difficult beast to tame due to the inconsistent nature of its engine management. It was obvious that Bimota had bitten off a little more than they could chew in the way of two-stroke engine technology. Even the Bimota factory has acknowledged that the project was too technologically challenging for a small firm with limited finances. With a change of ownership at the factory it was seen as a good time to revitalize the project, but only after production of the original model had been stopped and all previous units recalled.

The new company, Bimota Motor SpA, formed a "task force" to solve the problems that beset the early bikes. The team worked through the problems one by one and reportedly made huge strides in only three months. Now the company claims that the bugs have been ironed out and the bike is now reliable, tractable and easier to ride. The claims are probably true, reports from the track test of the Trophy -- the full-race version -- suggest the bike is greatly improved, if a little underpowered.

On the stand alongside the "evoluzione Trophy" was a new version for the road, "the evoluzione." Confused? Let me explain. The race version is dubbed the "Trophy" because Bimota plans to enter a few race series in several countries, possibly including the USA, using the race version- -- the Trophy -- of the VDue. Yet one has to wonder how many prospective customers will be prepared to fork over $20,000 for a bike that's likely to see more than its fair share of gravel rash, especially since owners will have to pay for a race kit on top of the purchase price.


The main difference between the two new VDue models and its predecessor lies in the breathing. Bimota has been forced to abandon the direct-injection technology and tack on a pair of carburetors. Unfortunately, they lose one of the bike's early selling points since the direct-injection technology is designed to clean up the emissions of notoriously smoky two-strokes. Now the bike is equipped a pair of Del'Orto VHSB 39 mm flat side carburetors. The factory added a hi-energy inductive discharge electronic ignition, featuring an EPU (electronic processor unit) they claim is so small it fits into the dash, away from damaging vibration and humidity. The factory claims 200 hp per liter, or, in other words, the bike produces around 100 hp, or about the same as a road going 600 Supersport. In order to keep the bike within emission standards some reworking of the transfer ports was necessary and Bimota claims to have recalibrated internal tolerances to improve reliability.


As far as the chassis is concerned little is changed. The bikes numbers are as expected from a bike with a racing heritage: 23° rake and 89 mm of trail. The front forks are 46 mm, fully-adjustable Paiolis. The rear suspension has an Ohlins shock, laid down in a horizontal position and is also fully-adjustable. The wheelbase is 1340 mm (52.7 in) and the overall length only 1940 mm (76.4 in). Bimota cites "extensive use of hi-tech materials" in the engine, chassis and bodywork as the reason for its low weight of 160 kilograms (353 lbs). Bimota hasn't revealed how much the street version weighs, but expect about 165 kilos (365 lbs).

The original version of the VDue cost Bimota not only a lot of money and ultimately the company itself, but it also had a profound negative effect on the credibility of this great little Italian specialty motorcycle manufacturer. It remains to be seen if the "evoluzione" version will rehabilitate the company in the minds of enthusiasts and financiers across the world.