jumps

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#2
Well you made me laugh!
I guess it would depend on how big the jumps were and how heavy you are.
The XR was never intended to be a high flying machine but small jumps should be okay. Is your bike experiencing problems or are you just being cautious?
Terry
 
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#3
I saw a guy break an XR 250 in half, from jumping it. I don't remember the year it was probably a 96 or 95. I wouldn't suggest a lot of heavy jumping on a XR, their not built for it.
DT
 
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#4
Cheers mates,
I only weigh about 10 stone. The reason I ask is the landings are quite hard as the suspension bottoms out. If I stiffen it, the ride will be too rough and I could damage the forks. I only jump a few feet off peat banks.
 

James

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#5
Doing jumps won't nacker the suspension too bad. If you fix the suspension to jump better, it still won't ride too rough over the small bumps if it is done right...BUT...the frame will definitely get nackered if you use it for a lot of high jumping....a few feet off the peat banks should be ok. Stiffen up the suspension and ride it. Keep an eye on the frame and footpeg mounts.
 
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#6
Sorry guys, but I have to ask. What's nacker? I assume it means damage or break, but I'm not sure.
By a few feet, do you mean, say, 5 feet? At times, I probably go 10 to 15 with my XR200 which is why I asked the suspesion question a few day's ago, but if I'm going to hurt my bike on some jumps even with a better suspesion then I wont upgrade it.
 
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#7
The word comes from "Knackery" which was where you took your horse to be disposed of (recycled). Quite often in Australia you will hear someone who has just put in a hard days work say "I'm knackered!". People also use the term "knackers" to refer to their balls.
Terry
 
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#8
I agree with terry, nackered means tired out. In a mechanical sense, it could mean buggered or broken, damaged, e.t.c
 

Flying Scot

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#9
Originally posted by RMcommando
Cheers mates,
I only weigh about 10 stone. I only jump a few feet off peat banks.
For those in the States that have not had the enlightening - 1 stone = 14lbs

peat banks - decayed trees and vegetative growth centuries old ( another few million years with more compresion and it will be coal ). Acts like super heavy mud pattie when cut and laid out to dry ( holds form ) then after turned and collected at the latter stages of the year can be burned on a fire or furnace to provide heat for cooking or warmth. This is per my definition. Any arguments or did I make it straightforward enough. ( Still am not sure how to spell Tushka )

Any questions ?

Oh yeah - RMcommando what a great place to ride, I wish I'd had a bike when I was younger.
 
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#10
Hi Flyin Scot

I would say your definition was accurate che. Peat used to be our main source of fuel before the war. Once cut, it is rickled, (put into piles to dry).
Then transported to each home by whoever and it is stored in the peat shed.

Not many people use peat nowdays, so behind Stanley, on the common, where every family had their own peat bank, there are excellent places to ride. Lot of jumps. The only problem with peat on jumps is it doesn't last long. The good thing is, it is soft to land on!

Peat is the worst for bogging your land rover, especially if it is deep! This can be a real bugger when the camp is soft after a few days of rain.

As motorbiking is such a big part in our culture there are special laws which let children ride without a license around Stanley, but not on the main roads of course.