Larimore Race Adventure (June 2nd)

Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
657
Likes
0
#1
(Bear with me, this is the first installation - I have sketchy internet access!)

Part 1

The weather turned around for us this weekend, and DMC Motorsports Inc. decided that they would make up for the rainy weather from the weekend before.

I had practiced the track two weeks before, and was feeling even a bit confidant on my way there. I even got help loading up this time as the boyfriend got the day off, and even woke up when I arrived at his garage where I keep my little CR.

Somehow I think our bikes had been messing around while we weren’t watching, because mine was splattered with oil and mud when I checked in on it. I thoroughly scolded my boyfriend’s big CRF (450) and worried that it could have given my bike some sort of motoSTD like…leaky antifreeze tubes or something. (Mods, if this seems inappropriate, feel free to just clip this little paragraph out…personally, I thought it was kinda funny, but won’t be offended if it disappears).

I got to the track on time, but when it came time to park I had a little trouble. I high-centered my little car (the ‘Scort) on some ruts in the parking field. After getting out and kicking the tire and dirt lumps a couple times, I got back in, and rocked the thing back and forth till I got unstuck and very carsick. Then got out and realized that I was too crookedly parked and had managed to take up at least three spaces; not to mention that I was way the hey too far away from the starting gate. Yes, my bike is small, but I’m smaller, and I don’t have any type of a pit crew or fan club to help me out. “Stupid stupid stupid!”

On my second try, I didn’t get stuck, and I managed to get within 40 feet of the staging area. Again, as I said before in one of my other reports DRN must have some sort of guardian angel!

This time around, I had to untangle myself from my automaticly retracting seatbelts,. Really, Ford was just trying to mess with people’s heads when they made those things. Mine only works occasionally, so 90% of the time I slip underneath it getting in, and pull it out of the way (put it behind me) getting out. This time it decided to attack after I had put it behind me. Once I opened the door, it came forward and promptly seatbelted me to the steering wheel. “NONONO Stupid car! Driver’s Ed. class said TEN INCHES from the steering wheel!! NOT trapped AGAINST the steering wheel! Geeze! LET GO OF ME!!!”

Having escaped the womaneating seatbelt trap, I scampered quickly to the trailer. Somehow, with my luck, and level of tiredness I expected to have a very rough day. It did boost my energy level when I got to budge in line because I had a membership card. I’m not a morning person at all, and I had to get up at 5:00am just to get there by 7:00am. The lady at the table didn’t know what she was doing, so I had to go back three times, the first because she forgot to give back my membership card, the second time because she didn’t give me a practice sticker, and third because she wouldn’t let me take a race order slip.

Unloading was very uneventful, for which I was surprised because of my previous luck with the seatbelt and registration. After that, I sat down on my trailer, and relaxed for a little while. One of the head officials came to check on me (and he does every time I show up anywhere, even in the grocery store), and commented on my dirty bike. He then proceeded to gift me with stickers (and lots of them!!) from EVS, AFK and Kenda Tires. Only a few racers got them, so I felt all cute and happy once more.

Practice was pretty tough. When it came time for the women to go out on the track, the official sent one girl out (either a 125 or 250). He pointed to the next girl (on an 85) to go, and she wouldn’t go out and pointed at another girl (also on an 85). She wouldn’t go either, and pointed at a chick on a 250 four stroker. He started laughing at them all, and tried to send the 250 out. Surprise! She didn’t go either, and pointed at me. At this point he gave them all a “WTHeck!?!?” look, and sent me out.

I went, but was really not too excited about having the bigger bikes behind me.
 

Chili

Lifetime Sponsor - Photog Moderator
Joined
Apr 9, 2002
Messages
8,063
Likes
11
#2
Not sure if there is a part two to this story, it seems incomplete..

Not sure how I missed your previous post about the Greenbush race but I did. You're very close to us, in fact according to the results (http://www.tracksideonlineresults.com/trackside/dmc/class.asp?s=1&e=2&c=141)3 of the Ladies you would have raced this weekend at Larimore, race in Manitoba regularly.
My son wanted to hit this race but couldn't get Saturday off work so he could only race our series in Brandon on Sunday.
If you're ever looking for more racing head on up to Manitoba but be prepared for a much longer day as our racedays are usually much larger (600+ yesterday).
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
657
Likes
0
#3
Here's the rest...sorry for the delay! It's long!

Part 2

I was pretty familiar with the track and really enjoyed how it was spread out. There are lots of big sweeping turns and absolutely no doubles! The up and down-hills were a little interesting, but with the bigger rear sprocket, I was pretty comfortable with my little CR’s power band. No one passed me until the third and last lap, when the little Canadian (well, okay. She is taller than me...) on the KTM 85 passed me towards the very end. Even getting passed like that was a pretty huge boost to my confidence as well because it meant the probabilities of getting lapped were very slim!

There had already been one or two bad crashes at the finish-line jump. I’m not exactly sure what type it was, but seemed to be a smaller, but steep, step-up that is supposed to launch you over the top of a hill that has a steep downsection that leads into a pretty steep downhill turn. When they waved the checkered flag for me, they also put out a yellow flag because one of the chicks in front of me had apparently endo-ed it badly. She was sitting up, but they took her off in the ambulance. (I wish her a quick recovery!)

I tagged around with the little Canadian for awhile, strutting around in my mismatching pants and jersey, nearly tripping with every step in my “bought’em-used-and-they’re-beat-up-and-too-big” boots. Twenty minutes after they gave the five minute warning for the drivers meeting, we all crowded around the registration trailer to hear any changes or new rules. When I turned to leave, I ran straight into my dad. He, in turn, tried to catch me in case I was falling, and I nearly threw a couple fists because I didn’t recognize him at first, nor expect him and my mom to be there! For the first time in my life I had fans other than the “quad dads” from the Greenbush race!

I lead them to the seating area which was conveniently located at the top of a very steep hill (no surprise by now eh?). Because the path was full of gravel and rocks AND loose dirt, I took one step up, and slid back three in my boots. It was a never ending journey at that speed, and I had my parents laughing at me because I wasn’t keeping up very well. When I reached the top, I turned around just in time to see a familiar figure have his feet slide out from under him. My boyfriend, having the usual male ego was back on his feet in a second, casually brushing dust off his hands and jeans, pretending that it hadn’t happened, while trying to see if anyone had seen him slip. “Good job Mr. Cool!! How’s that dirt taste?” Needless to say, I was still very glad to see him there.

I have fans AND a pit crew!!!

We watched the first few races with my parents, and then left them to find some food and check out the bike one last time. About an hour later it was time to push the little CR to the staging area.

The First Moto:

I gratefully allowed the boyfriend push my bike to the staging area, then Mr. Cool stood back and didn’t hold the bike for me while we waited there, and I nearly dropped it twice because I was so nervous. He couldn’t figure out why I was so nervous until I pointed at the big bikes sitting right behind me. His poor attempt at comforting me was to say “It’s okay that they’re bigger. You’re a smaller target and it won’t be so easy for them to knock you off the bike. And if they do, you’ll just get pushed into the ground a little and it won’t hurt as bad!”

At this point, I decided that pit crews, no matter how handsome and broadshouldered they are, should NOT be allowed to say things like that. I fired him on the spot, and told him to go up the big hill to watch.

The old geezers were too slow in getting to the gate (They run the vet’s class just before the women’s, and I say old geezers with quite a bit of respect, but you guys are SO slooooow getting to the staging area!!!). Three of them were late, which only built my nervousness. Finally they left, and we got to pick clothespins from the bucket. I ended up with #8, which wasn’t too bad, as only two riders had lower numbers than mine.

I picked out the stoplight right away as I picked a spot and pushed the little CR up to it. The start goes up a hill which has a 90 degree turn right at the top. I chose a middle spot, that didn’t have a terrible rut leading the whole way up. When I tried to put the bike’s front wheel about a foot from where the gate would land, I ran into trouble. It rolled forwards until it hit the gate. “No. I didn’t say to park there. C’mon back up let’s try it again!!” No matter what I did, the bike kept rolling forward in the rut.

I evidently shouldn’t have fired my pit crew, which was standing about 20 feet behind me, ignoring my gesture to “get over here now and help me ‘cos I’m too little to move my bike to kick the dirt out from the rut where my rear tire should be. He smiled and waved and…just…stood…there. I gave up and held the front brake for the rest of the vet’s race.

Red light: (start your engine I’m assuming) most of my nervousness disappeared. After a little warming up, I started snapping my throttle back at the big bikes just to prove that size isn’t everything at the gate.

Yellow light: The adrenaline definitely started pumping, and I even stopped shaking. I was distracted by the fact for a second, because the same thing happened when I used to race in swimming. I shook all the way until they said “take your mark” then the feeling of deadly calm always came. The CR was running perfectly, and I was ready to at least give the track a good hard run.

Green light: The gate went down almost a second later, and I dropped the clutch. I almost leaf my slow thinking head behind with the much better start than I was expecting.

I was second into the turn, but the little KTM passed me in the first corner. I held on to 3rd for three more corners keeping a closer tail on the 85 in front of me, then the 150 slipped by me in the larger turn. A 250 came past me soon after, and the green 85 passed me in the next corner (if I recall correctly). I hung on to her tail as long as I could, and kept up to the pack pretty well. I even felt that wonderful aggression that pushed me a little faster into the corners and a lot faster off the jumps. Never in my life have I jumped so far before, and I was loving the air time. Usually I lock up when the bike gets a little squirrelly, but I just snapped the throttle through most of the scary parts.

The green 85 passed the little KTM, which I kept in my sights through the rest of the race. Finally, they waved the checkered flag, and I tried to do a nice big final jump over the finishline step-up. My forearms locked up, and couldn’t pull the clutch, while my throttle stayed pinned all the way down the big hill to which I yelled (at the throttle arm) all the way down “NONONONONO NOT GOOD!!! LET GO! LET GO! LET GO! STOP IT! LET GO! NOT GOOD!!”

At the last possible second I tried my final option.

“AIEYAH!!!”

The clutch went in, and the throttle rolled off, leaving me wondering why I hadn’t tried that in the first place.

The boyfriend/re-hired pit crew caught me (literally) as I tried to get off the little CR. By the time we had it back to my parking spot, the parents showed up too. I got a pat on the shoulder. Then they all left. “Ah? Who’s going to help me load up after the 2nd moto? Anyone?” They didn’t even wave goodbye. That left me sunburnt and dehydrated, so I drank roughly six bottles of water, then immediately regretted it as I ran to the little portaloos like a pregnant woman for the next two hours This kept me pretty occupied until the second moto.

Second moto: I got reports that it was down-pouring in Grand Forks and that the rain was headed our way. I figured that this gave me roughly half an hour before the rain would hit the track. Wouldn’t you know it, half an hour later, the women’s class is sitting at the starting gates with the very dark clouds approaching very quickly. All of us were getting more and more nervous as they got closer and closer. The organizers announced that they would drop a lap from our race. We all heartily agreed without any complaint.

The little CR barely started before the gates dropped, and they dropped before the rain did, but we didn’t put on a very good show. I got a good start again, but got passed almost immediately in the turns. I was still tired from the first moto, as was everyone else. The little CR was a lot heavier, and I was concentrating on just staying upright and on the bike by the second lap. A yellow flag waved at the top of the hill, and I slowed to avoid the 150 that had crashed in the corner at the bottom. She was up quickly, and made it to second before anyone could blink. On the last turn, the Honda 250 went down, and I flung myself at the last stretch hoping she wouldn’t get up in time and that I wouldn’t be last.

Her bike started just as I caught up, and her 250 killed my little CR on the last two jumps. It was close for a moment, but she had the better power.

I was ready to be done at that point. I shakily pushed the bike to the trailer, and put it on its stand to sit for a second, hoping that the DRN guardian angel would somehow just magically put the bike on the trailer, but it didn’t. After 15 minutes of water guzzling, I started the bike, and tried to clutch it up the ramp. It took quite a few tries as my arms and hands were almost useless from fatigue. The little KTM rider showed up, and helped me strap the bike down. I thanked her, got into the faithful ‘Scort, and drove off.

As scary as the clouds looked, it never rained in Larimore.

All in all I’d have to say it was the best adventure I’ve ever had, and I don’t intend to quit.
 

Chili

Lifetime Sponsor - Photog Moderator
Joined
Apr 9, 2002
Messages
8,063
Likes
11
#4
Nice Read, you certainly have a knack for the story telling :cool: That green 85 is actually a KX100.
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Messages
424
Likes
1
#5
:worship: You are awesome!!!! :worship:

I'm lovin' it. I may have to pack my bags and nominate myself trailer crew.

I was about to take a shot at the boyfriend of yours... Not letting you ride his bike, making you pick up his stuff on your checkbook, not going to your races....not wanting to woods ride....However, after hearing this story it was enough for me to give him a second chance. You totally gotta love a guy who has no qualms that you know what you are doing and do not need his help. Especially one who can do it so cheerily! :laugh: Bonus points for being eye candy at the line, lol. :rotfl:

Great story. Let us know when the next race is.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
657
Likes
0
#6
Chili: If that's a 100, I think I want one! If you know any details that I missed concerning the starts or race finishing orders, let me know and I'd be glad to edit them in!

Olderndirtmom: I think half the reason he lets me do everything by myself is because he likes to see me struggle. Apparently I make things like trying to loosen stuck bolts look cute. I get told things like that quite often. Like when I'm trying to reach things on the 3rd shelf without a chair and muttering evil things. Or getting frustrated to the point of standing there for 15 minutes jumping to reach, and knocking stuff down onto my toes. He also loves the "ninja yells." As for eye candy...He's mine!!! He may be a construction worker and Harley rider with the whole stereotypical attitude that goes with it, his arms may be bigger than my thighs, and he may have woman trying to hit on him when I'm in the store picking out chocolate or pepsi...but he's mine...and more loyal than a golden retriever if that's possible... :)

Next race is this weekend (June 9) in Greenbush MN.
 

Chili

Lifetime Sponsor - Photog Moderator
Joined
Apr 9, 2002
Messages
8,063
Likes
11
#7
justalonewolf007 said:
Chili: If that's a 100, I think I want one! If you know any details that I missed concerning the starts or race finishing orders, let me know and I'd be glad to edit them in!
I posted the results link earlier in my first post ( http://www.tracksideonlineresults.c...s=1&e=2&c=141 ) Your account sounds dead on to me and besides I'd rather listen to the story you tell so well than just look at a results list.

That Green bike is most definitely a KX100. I have a photography business and shoot our races in Manitoba on a weekly basis. I also do some race reports for RacerXCanada's website so I'm very familiar with the racers.

Here's a shot of her



and then a close crop of the Shroud.

 
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
657
Likes
0
#8
Those are some great shots - I know that it would be fun have you as a photographer at the DMC races rather than the woman we have now. She had foot surgery and had a tough time getting around, even so, I don't think she quite has the knack for grabbing the art behind the rider instead of the rider him or herself. Although it could be that I was looking at them through the tiny preview size...

My mom was pretty upset that I didn't have any pictures of my races. I had to tell her that I couldn't race and take pics of myself at the same time. :)
 

Chili

Lifetime Sponsor - Photog Moderator
Joined
Apr 9, 2002
Messages
8,063
Likes
11
#9
Thanks for the compliment. My son really wants to try and get down for one of these DMC races. If we find a weekend that works I'll make sure I get you some shots for your mom :cool:
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
657
Likes
0
#10
Awesome! Thanks! I'm sure she'd appreciate it quite a bit!

I asked the Steele racing woman to catch a few for me, and I was pretty surprised at her approach! Somehow she managed to be in every single corner and at every tabletop at this weekend's race in Greenbush!

I'll have the report up either sometime tonight, or by midweek.