Need help with sand at muenster/Bulcher

Joined
Jul 26, 2002
Messages
67
Likes
0
#1
Hey guys,

I went riding at bulcher yesterday, and have some questions about the sand and such. Everyone was passing me, while I was having trouble keeping my balance, and when I tryed to plane up on to of the sand, then I felt unstable. I'm afraid if I turn it too sharp in the sand, i'm going to lose it. You know the place down by the river? I decided to just let it loose and go. I didn't fall, but my rear fishtaled, and I got that kinda queasy feeling a couple of times, like when you feel like your gonna Panic. Thats the best way I can describe it. My bike just goes all over the place. Anyway, will I eventually get used to flying through the sand, or am I just not aggresive enough? Is there something i'm missing? I just keep hitting those ATV ruts, and the front tire wants to follow them which makes it hard to keep my balance.

Thanks!
James
BTW, you know that sign that warns you about quick sand? well, I certainly found it. It took an ATV to pull me out, and I almost couldn't get my feet out. Be carefull! I know y'all probably already knew that, just thought I'd let ya know.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Messages
133
Likes
0
#2
Hey James, sounds like you had a rough time! It takes a while to adjust to sand riding but one thing you may want to check is your suspension settings. You will need to have a quicker rebound to get the tires back to driving/turning and softer dampening in the sand. Also, what type of tires are you running? The Dunlop 756 or Michelin M12 or Starcross work great for me there. Also, try staying back on the bike more and standing up. Hope this helps!

Keith
 

Brian

Stanbagger
N. Texas SP
Joined
May 1, 2001
Messages
1,452
Likes
0
#3
Sand at Muenster is very deep. There's really no way of keeping a perfect line, but the best thing you can do is sit back on the seat and not let the front end go all over the place(ie hold a firmer grip on the direction your bars are pointed).

Also be careful playing in the creek too much, that water is baaaaaaad on a bike. If at all possible, soak everything with WD-40 at the beginning of the day, and stop at a car wash on the way home and get the majority of the corrosive funk off.
 

Enduro_Nut

Subscriber
Joined
Feb 7, 2002
Messages
1,155
Likes
0
#4
Originally posted by Keetoman
Hey James, sounds like you had a rough time! It takes a while to adjust to sand riding but one thing you may want to check is your suspension settings. You will need to have a quicker rebound to get the tires back to driving/turning and softer dampening in the sand. Also, what type of tires are you running? The Dunlop 756 or Michelin M12 or Starcross work great for me there. Also, try staying back on the bike more and standing up. Hope this helps!

Keith
Keith is right on - make sure your sag is correct in the rear and your tires are appropriate. I run the Dunlop 756 front with the S-12 rear which is not perfect for sand but great all around combo.

Keep your weight on the rear of your bike and allow the front end to lighten up, if you don't you will end up over the bars - the technique is similiar when going over the whoops.
 

tx246

Subscriber
Joined
May 8, 2001
Messages
1,306
Likes
1
#5
yeah, what they said^^^^^ sand problems are magnified when the speed is slow. take it from me, im slow. the faster you go, the better the bike works. i tend to kinda go loose on the bike in the sand while keeping the weight on the back (standing). the bike is never going to track perfectly in deep sand. thats why dez riders are fond of steering dampeners. as stan was saying.....stay out of the water. the sand and water at bulcher have a very high salt content. wash your bike when you get home or your bike will look like you left it at galveston beach for a week.
 

Tony Eeds

Godspeed Tony.
N. Texas SP
Joined
Jun 9, 2002
Messages
9,544
Likes
0
#10
James, you sound like me! Most of it has to do with nerves. I used to be faster than I am now, but with income now connected to my right wrist, I've slowed down. In many ways that is more dangerous, but try and explain that to my head. :laugh:

Enduro_Nut, Stan and JMD are the local NTSP guru's regarding Muenster. They will not steer you wrong.

BTW - Are you in North Texas? nc?

Drop me a note with a current email address to teeds@whiterockstudio.com and I will add you to our ride list I am putting together. The email in your profile isn't working, or didn't this morning anyway.

BTW - too the rest of y'all ... If I don't have your current email and you want to be on the list, drop me a note as well. Please give me a first and last name as I tend to delete all the posts I get with only one name as the sender.

Tony
 

Green Horn

aka Chip Carbone
N. Texas SP
Joined
Jun 20, 1999
Messages
2,563
Likes
0
#11
Sand is fun once you get used to it. :) Like others have mentioned, suspension and tires are part of the issue. You also want to run lower PSI especially on the front tire. The biggest thing that made me faster in the sand was GOING faster. Once you get used to the feeling of "squishy" handling you'll be fine. BTW, what size bike are you riding? It also helps to have a bike that can get up on top of the sand quickly and keep a good speed. ie. Most folks will agree that trying to ride a 125 in sand isn't the best or easiest thing to do.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2002
Messages
67
Likes
0
#12
I'm actually riding an xr650, which is easier to ride in the sand compared to some smaller bikes I tested out there. I know its not a lack of power(LOL), its just a lack of self control.

For some reason, my profile will not let me access it. I just moved back to TX from NC, and havn't been able to change it. I would really like to go riding with y'all sometime and maybe y'all could give me some pointers. Anyway, my e-mail is pjmiller@fastmail.com

Lookin' forward to it!
James miller
 

JMD

Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2001
Messages
1,402
Likes
0
#13
Seriously, though, regarding the sand at Muenster. Two problems with sand: going straight and making turns. Both work better with generous application of power. While going straight, keep driving with a good bit of throttle, lean back a bit, and let the front end hunt just a little; it's OK. For turns, avoid chopping the throttle, or the front end will dive. Do all your braking early, enter the turn with power on, and accelerate out of it. The rear wheel's drive will keep you upright and driving through the sand.
 

yzguy15

Sprayin tha game
N. Texas SP
Joined
Oct 27, 2000
Messages
1,271
Likes
0
#15
One thing that has always helped me is to concentrate on pushing on the bars instead of pulling on them to steer. Instead of pulling each end the way you want to go, push on the opposite side with your palm.. if that makes any sense. This helps avoid having your front end dig into the sand during a turn.