O-Ring Chain (yes, again!)

buffmaster

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#1
All right. I know this has been gone over before(b/c I did a search), but I'd like to re-affirm things. I just got a new chain and rear sprocket(didn't get a new front b/c the one I have probably has less than 10 hours on it), an RK X-ring and a steel Sunstar. From what I've read from the other posts on this subject, cleaning w/Simple Green or kerosene and stiff nylon bristle brush, followed by WD-40, is the way to go, in regards to maintenance. Now, two questions. 1)Is there anything I should do to the chain before I put it on(like WD-40) or just throw 'er on? 2)I have a can of PJ1 non-O-ring lube that's about 90% full. Will this stuff HARM my x-rings, and if so, should I get a different lube, or will WD-40 be sufficient? (I'm not being cheap, I just really have a thing about doing unnecessary things)
 

smb_racing

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#2
O ring chains are self lubricating, applying any kind of outside lubricant will only harm the chain in the long run by giving dirt something to adhere to. The purpose of putting WD on it is to take the water off after washing. This is the only maintenance that is required.
 

buffmaster

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#3
So throw it on, clean it and spritz it w/a little bit o' wd-40 to occaisionally to keep it from rusting?
 
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#4
EVERY time you clean the bike, you'll need to spray it down with WD-40. Make sure you get all the sideplates and rollers fully, or you'll get rust.
 

Jaybird

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#5
I have to disagree with you, smb....
Ring chains have lubricant that is held inside the roller. They are designed so that dirt, water, and grit cannot effect the integrity of the rollers pins and bushing surfaces. It is correct to use a water displacement after washing, but then to be proper, you do need to add a lubricant. WD40 wont cut it as a lube. There are still friction surfaces on any ring chain that are not protected, and for proper maintenance they must be lubricated as well.

Thinking that a ring chain is maintenance free is a mistake. It will make you trust it no matter what, which you can not do. Once a ring has been violated, it will cause more damage to that link than even the total lack of lubricant will.
So, for the reason I stated above, coupled with the fact that a ring can and will eventually be violated, lubricate your ring chain as you would a regular chain, just be conscience that some lubes can break down o-rings.

Many will argue this, I will always disagree. :)


one more thing, I do agree that lubes can atract dirt and grit...the WRONG type of lubes that is. Try to choose a dry film lube if possible.
 
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KelvinKDX

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#6
Jaybird,

one more thing, I do agree that lubes can atract dirt and grit...the WRONG type of lubes that is. Try to choose a dry film lube if possible.
Can you expand on this? any particular dry film lube?
 
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#7
Hello,
I have found that the Maxim Chain Wax is good stuff. I clean my dry chain, with a dry brush to remove any sand/dirt etc... Then I apply a good coating of Chain Wax and let it sit up for at least 10 minutes. Next, I wash my bike, with Simple Green, and try to avoid directly spraying the chain with water or Simple Green. After washing and drying my bike, I start her up and take a 5 to 10 minute ride to heat up the chain/engine to get rid of any puddled water I may have missed. Finally, after the chain is dry and warm, I put another coat of Chain Wax on and she's good to go. It works for me, and I've never had any problems with rust, frozen links or break downs.

The trick with O-ring chains is to not let water get inside the O-rings. As well as O-rings keep dirt and water out, they can also hold dirt and water in if you are unfortunate enough to get stuff inside the rings. Good luck.
 
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#8
Originally posted by Jaybird
WD40 wont cut it as a lube. There are still friction surfaces on any ring chain that are not protected, and for proper maintenance they must be lubricated as well.
That's why I hit my chain with MFR chain lube after the WD-40 dries.:D
 
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#10
I don't think it will make a difference whether it's for O-rings or not. It's still chain lube. I would use it if I were you.
 
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#11
I would reconsider the Front sprocket. It may only have 10 hrs on it but the front sprocket is enduring a hell tight curve on it.

If this was 10hrs with a worn chain the damage may already be done. How much did the chain cost vs front sprocket?

Hi Jaybird I feel like dropping you some bait as I know this is your pet topic but I can’t think of anything smart arse enough to say.

Canola & Talcum powder perhaps?
Sad attempt I know, I’ll try harder next time.
 

Jaybird

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#12
LOL...Dave, you also seem to know I'm easily baited! :)

A dry-film lubricant is simply a fluid that has solids in it. The fluid part of the lube is usually similar to kerosene and is used to carry the lubricating solids to the friction areas as well as actually helping to clean the surfaces as the carrier is a solvent. Once applied, dry-film lubes will place solids like molybdenum disalfate and/or graphite in the microscopic craters existing on the friction surfaces. These solids carry the load.
Once the carrier evaporates (semi-dry state) the only thing left are the solids.
These solids actually repel one another molecularly. This is how they manage to carry friction loads.
Dry-film is used by most all of the manufacturing industry on roller chains and is becomming more popular for off-road enthusiests. Honda does mfg one type of dry-film, though I don't know the nomenclature of it.
Like Dave, I'm an advocate of starting with new chains AND sprockets. Wear on them both is in direct relationship to how well you lube/maintain your chain.
If anyone wants to try some dry-film, just drop me an e-mail and I can send you a sample. You won't be able to make a good camparison from a sample alone, it will just show you how the stuff looks/feels. For a good comparison you need to start with new chain and sprockets and always use the dry-film and compare to the longevity you experienced before using conventional lubes. Proper tension/proper cleaning/proper lubricant and application are the keys.

Be nice , Dave...I fluster so easily! :D
 
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#13
I have read that after you clean the chain with a brush spray on lube PRIOR to washing to help displace the H2O then dry off chain and treat with preffered lube.
 

Jaybird

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#14
Oldmxr,
Some lubricants do contain a water displacement ingredient in the package, but lubricant is much more expensive than say WD-40. I suggest the WD-40 after washing, actually the aerosol will help to push the water out from the rollers. Then use a good lube. If you don't have any WD-40, then you can hot lap around the yard to sling out most of the water, then lubricate.

Putting lube on prior to washing is a waste of money, and it also does nothing for displacing water as the water will push the lube out. I'm talking lube here, not Uncle Joes Carnuba Wax.