RC's new electronics

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#1
So the folks at honda are using some data aquisition equipment on RC's bike!

Ok some ideas what they are doing...

Someone said it was a front wheel speed sensor to monitor the wheel speed. RC said that they are going with a whole new set up for the bike for the 04 Supercross season. Now what is the reason for the the wheel sensor? My only un-educated guess could be that it is used for suspension set up. Ex. Maybee how they are setting up the shock because of his new setup he is wheeling out of the turns and they make adjustments to keep the front end on the ground just enough to have really good drive out of the turns. Or maybe engine setup for gearing or what not.

I have a limited backround with automotive data aquisition. I spent a good amount of time test driving for GM/Chrysler/VW/Audi and also building custom data aquisition systems for Brake testing and dyno testing.

I believe that the AMA sanction events do not allow test equipment on the bikes during the races. So at the open was a perfect chance to use some newer technology to get the power to the ground with RC's funky set up.

Any other thoughts?
 

marcusgunby

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#2
I wouldnt think it was for suspension setup-you can monitor but not really control suspension-however on the engine you have feedback systems already, so i would guess its to help power delivery or maybe even engine breaking???
 

bedell99

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#3
For the front wheel, I would think it was a sensor to measure the temperature of the brakes in racing conditions.

Erik
 
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#4
I don't think they would put sensors on the bike (for a race) that can't be used to control something, real-time. Since the engine (carb, ignition) are pretty much the only thing that can be electronically controlled, I would think it's used for some kind of traction control
 
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#5
Originally posted by Anssi
I don't think they would put sensors on the bike (for a race) that can't be used to control something, real-time.
Ricky said it himself that their are some new electronics on the left side of his handle bar. I didn't get to make it to the pits so if anyone did maybe there is a picture of it.

He also said that the guys on the YZ's (CR) are going so fast that they were trying to come up with something new to stay out on top. Didn't work this weekend. I think that the AMA doesn't allow testing while racing so he used it for the US open.
 
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#6
Originally posted by marcusgunby
I wouldnt think it was for suspension setup-you can monitor but not really control suspension-however on the engine you have feedback systems already, so i would guess its to help power delivery or maybe even engine breaking???
Marcus thanks for the input, the track had some pretty deep ruts and ricky wasn't as smooth as CR though them. Wouldn't it be possible to have a wheel speed sensor like that on a road bike or mountain bike and take data on different sections of the track like the whoops to see changes in front wheel speed like when the front tire lands imbetween bumps as apposed to skipping over the top.

To me I think that the set up for ricky's honda works great in the outdoors but due to his size he is at dissavantage in the whoop section. So why not dial the thing in for the section that will slow you the most. Ricky can be fast everywhere else.
 

holeshot

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#8
Originally posted by endosports


Marcus thanks for the input, the track had some pretty deep ruts and ricky wasn't as smooth as CR though them.
So RC wasn't as smooth on his CR as CR on his YZ? :eek:
 
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#9
I got this from www.transworldmx.com

The Honda CR250R of Ricky Carmichael had an external solenoid affixed to the cylinder’s electronic powervalve cover. Apparently, the device was part of an elaborate data acquisition system, which monitors throttle position throughout the moto. Ever listen to one of your buddies talk about how he was "wide open" in a certain section? Well, systems like this usually show that riders are rarely wide open, if ever. But what about RC? According to Ernesto Fonseca’s mechanic Kenny Germain, the race team was shocked to find at one of their outdoor tests, RC was wide open an unbelievable 98% of the time!
 

marcusgunby

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#10
I would love to beleive he is wide open 98% of the time but its a dream-i can count the time he isnt -i bet its no higher than 40%-they did the same with gp riders a few years ago and they were down at about 35%.
 

bedell99

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#12
I'm thinking that the power valve is open 98% of the time when the throttle is flicked on. So in other words ricky has the throttle either all the way on or off. Pretty insane. Also I'm still thinking that sensor on the front was to measure the brakes in a supercross type setting. I would think that an factory rider on a supercross track can toast a front brake within a couple of laps. Maybe honda is seeing how much ricky uses his brake on an average lap. Ithink that is a more logical explanation, but I have been known to be wrong. I mean what would you really gain about knowing front wheel speed. It is more useful to measure rear wheel speed and see how much your tire is spinning and hooking up.

Erik
 
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#13
I could be way off but I was under the impression that many of the pros set their throttle up at the speed they want so when they are "full throttle" it may not be all the way open? That way they can go full throttle and just feather the clutch and change gears instead of being consirned with over throttle. Am I nuts?
 
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#14
A front wheel speed sensor could be used to check tires to see how well the rear is hooking up - both wheels need to have speed sensors, the front is like a reference for the actual speed of the bike, while the one on back can be used to tell how much the back is slipping once the speed is known. On the other hand, it seems like on a track that tight they would hardly have both wheels on the ground enough for it to be of use... but I guess if they want to test a supercross/arenacross tire or setup, it has to be one that kind of track.

I don't think it's possible that he was wide open 98% of the time. If he shuts off at all for corners, which would be kinda weird not to, or in the air, it would be under 98%. It sounds to me like it might have been something a mechanic or someone tossed out jokingly but got reported more seriously.
 

viking20

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#15
Years ago when they started collecting engine data in Road Racing,it was a shock for a lot of people....I believe it was Eddie Lawson who told his crewchief:I cant use full throttle more than 50% of the time! His crewchief just looked at the data and said:"Actually Eddie,youre only wide open for about 28% of the time"! Lawson walked away mumbling:"I hate those damned things"! :)