Really high temp. grease?

clw

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2000
Messages
239
Likes
0
#1
I'm cooking all of my grease's. On the brake caliper pins, that is. Yamaha doesn't state, but what is the best grease to use on these? These are the pins that allow the caliper assembly to float and adjust as pads wear, not the pad retainer pins (which aren't greased).

Thanks
 

EricGorr

Super Power AssClown
Joined
Aug 24, 2000
Messages
708
Likes
1
#2
There are greases designed for use on brake caliper pins, they're popular in auto repair. Try an auto parts store. You can also use the Teflon grease which is designed for suspension components.
White lith grease is also good, I assemble exhaust valve systems using this type of grease.
Good luck, Eric
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2001
Messages
349
Likes
0
#3
I have done this for years and had no problem but tell me what you think.

I use a teflon base grease. its brand name is MAGIC LUBE, used for pool pump bearings and rubber gaskets.

this stuff is thick and water beads off of it.

I have done a test with water and grease, by putting a dab of grease in a cup and adding water then stiring.

what I have found with wheel bearing grease is that in no time at all you have sludge and with the Magic lube you can pour the water out no matter how much you stir it.

They also make Magic lube II that is a Hi-temp.
 

Jaybird

Apprentice Goon
Joined
Mar 16, 2001
Messages
6,452
Likes
0
Location
Charlestown, IN
#4
I don't think that "high-temp" is of any concern on lubricating pins and such.
Even cheap greases will have a drop point (point when the consistency of the grease goes to a more fluid state) of over 200 deg. F. Your brake pins are probably not reaching this temperature. Greases are also rated on how thick they are, sgli #00, 0, 1, 2......2 being the thickest. I always try to use a #2 grease on bikes. If you want to spend a bunch of money on high-temp grease, I would recommend Castrol 860-220-#2 (lithium soap base) which will hold on till about 400+ degrees F. ( I think Castrol rates it a bit lower but I have tested it and know it will hold past 400 deg.) Mobil AW2 is also a great all-around lithium based grease.
 

clw

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2000
Messages
239
Likes
0
#5
How HOT is HOT?

Although I have not measured the temperature it's hot! I tend to drag the brakes in the tight woods and cook the brake fluid regularly. Water explodes off the caliper from my Camelbak after a hard ride and I think the Motul fluid is rated for 585-600°. On occasion I'll boil it. Now how much of this gets to the pins I don't know. Regular Quaker State white marine grease (lithium) turns to paste after one hard ride, it's not the answer.

I think I have some Teflon grease in my storage cabinet for the pool pump, it might be Magic Lube. I'll give it a try. Thanks for the responses.
 
Joined
Aug 25, 1999
Messages
537
Likes
1
#6
Never Seize brand grease. It's silver. They use this stuff in steel mills. It rules. I've used it on header bolts on engines and taken the bolts out a year later and it's still wet.
 

Jaybird

Apprentice Goon
Joined
Mar 16, 2001
Messages
6,452
Likes
0
Location
Charlestown, IN
#7
You can also find small cans of Never Seize in the plumbing supply section of most hardware stores. Pipefitters swear by it.
 

clw

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2000
Messages
239
Likes
0
#9
So many answers!

Wow! Thanks again.

Is Never Seize the Permatex product or something else? If it's in the plumbing section of a hardware store I may be out of luck. The generic monsters, Home Depot and Lowes, have put most hardware stores out of business, and they were so much fun to browse in. I did a web search and got a different product http://www.pollardwater.com/emarket/pages/P67702neverseez.asp Just wondering which one to go buy.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2000
Messages
1,490
Likes
1
#10
Re: How HOT is HOT?

Originally posted by clw
I tend to drag the brakes in the tight woods and cook the brake fluid regularly. Water explodes off the caliper from my Camelbak after a hard ride and I think the Motul fluid is rated for 585-600°. On occasion I'll boil it.
Maybe you should drag the brakes a little less?:think
 

clw

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2000
Messages
239
Likes
0
#11
typical enduro!

...accelerate as hard as you can, brake as hard as you can, turn, accelerate as hard as you can, brake as hard as you can, turn, repeat every 50 feet for 65 miles.....

If I don't work the brakes hard I slow too much, can't have that, I'm a racer man. No apologies
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2000
Messages
1,490
Likes
1
#12
I am hard on my brakes too, but I don't drag them when I'm on the gas...
I'm slow enough without throwing out an anchor...;)
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2001
Messages
252
Likes
0
#13
Hey clw,
I say if your rotors don't come back tinted blue after an enduro, you were probably late to your checks.
I have used Never Seize for years on my axles with much better results then grease. It is aluminum based (with some copper and graphite) anti gall lubricant. It is not made to be used in a roller bearing though. The compound is made by Bostik and has a temperature rating of 1800 degrees F. I have found the 'copper rich' anti seize compound made by Permatex to be exceptional. This is the same stuff my Glock came with from the factory on the slide rails. I have found it to have better anti wear properties then Never Seize, though it costs at least three times as much and is much harder to find.
 

Jaybird

Apprentice Goon
Joined
Mar 16, 2001
Messages
6,452
Likes
0
Location
Charlestown, IN
#14
Kxaggerator....
Those Glocks are Dandeeeerous!:eek:

Get yerself a Para-ordinance!;)
 
Joined
May 4, 2001
Messages
192
Likes
0
#15
...

I swear by never sieze as well!

It really makes a great lubricant. Its a little thin, but works great for things like bushings and stuff. We use it for lubrication spindles on blower motors in the AC industry. Some of those motors really build up alot of speed!

It stains your clothes and hands real bad though... Thats about its only bad part. Not even Fast Orange will get it out...