Rear tire slipping

yzeater

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#1
I don't understand why the rear tire on my cr125 seems to slip. The tire has lots of knobby left. When I hit the gas, the tire seems to slip from side to side for a couple seconds until I get going straight at a high speed. Is this normal? I haven't crashed because of this, but I didn't have the problem on the xr. What's wrong? Thanks for suggestions.
 

RM_guy

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#2
A two stroke is going to have a much stronger burst of power when you hit the gas than a 4 stroke does. Because of this the rear tire will break loose much easier no matter how good the tread is. There are a couple of things you can do to keep the tire from sliding excessively but due to the power characteristics of a 2 stroke, especially a smaller bore, it’s going to happen.

- Try to position your body further back on the seat to weight the rear end more. Be prepared to move forward if the rear tire suddenly hooks up. Through practice you can use your body position to strike a delicate balance between maximizing traction and keeping from looping out.
- Work on delivering the power to the ground more smoothly through throttle and/or clutch control. If your bike has enough low end you can simple roll the throttle on slower. On a smaller bore bike you will need to slip the clutch in order to keep the engine speed up in the power band.
- If the rear end does start sliding from side to side, keep the front wheel pointed where you want to go and try to get up on the pegs so the bike isn’t pushing your body all over the place.

Remember, a screaming bike doesn’t always mean you’re going fast. If the power isn’t getting to the ground, you are just wasting gas.

Good luck and practice, practice, practice.
 

High Lord Gomer

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#3
(In addition to the excellent info given by YT_Guy):

Having lots of knobs left doesn't yield as much traction as having sharp knobs. Matching the tire type to the terrain is also important.
 

fremontguy

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#4
That 2-stroke tire slipping is somthing I've noticed also lately. In dusty, slippery hard pack my 300 will want to spit to the side, especially if I hit a rut or bump climbing hills. My only friend is steady momentum or it's back to the bottom and try again. The rear tire is a IRC VE33, so would a mud tire like S12 give better hook up in dustpack?
 

High Lord Gomer

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#5
I love the S12 in mud, but have not been impressed on dry hardpack. I prefer the 739 for those conditions.

Come to think of it, the 737 did the best for me on dry hardpack, but it doesn't last more than a couple rides. :(
 
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#6
the most important aspect of controlling wheel spin, is clutch and throttle control. RM_GUY basically said it all. i can ad, that if you set your weight back further, then you are going to need to lean forward into the acceleration more, also, weigh your outside peg, that will give you better drive, which will keep you straiter. hey gomer, have you ever tried the maxxis c6001 its a pretty good tire, and it is really versital, i also like the pirelli mt320 in the wet stuff.
 
Last edited:

Moo

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#7
I would just practice and get used to the power. I had trouble with that when I switched to two-strokes. Practice, Practice, Practice!:)