Returning to MX - advice on what bike for a heavier guy

carlins_leap

Member
Jul 24, 2008
6
0
Hi all,

I've enjoyed reading through some of the threads - thanks :)

After a 20 year hiatus, I've decided to kick off my mid-life crisis by getting back into MX :)
I was hoping to get some advice on what bike to get...I've let myself go a bit over the last few years and I'm carrying a lot of extra weight around...I'm working on it, but I'm also impatient and want to get a new bike asap. I'm 6'3" / 6'4" and 300lbs...I know, I know, but I'm working on it...

I started looking at 250 4-strokes, but wondered if this was going to be enough to get me round the tracks and trails well enough? Do I need to be looking at a 350/450?

My reservations are that, given the amount of time off bikes, I'm definitely in the beginner category again, so I'm worried a 450 will be too much - though if a 250 isn't going to be enough, perhaps I don't have any decisions to make?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers
Steve
 

truespode

Moderator / Wheelie King
Jun 30, 1999
7,945
242
At 300lbs a 450 is your best choice. You will need to have the springs replaced for your weight but that should be about it until you get enough stamina to really push yourself and the bike.

I'm a big fan of the CRF450 and YZF450 but KTM450's seem to be very popular as well.

Pick a color you like best, replace the springs, wear good gear and have fun.

Ivan
 

carlins_leap

Member
Jul 24, 2008
6
0
A 250 4 stroke will work but not be to fast, I would maybe look in to a 250 2stroke or 350 4 stroke if your riding more aggressive.
Thanks for the reply :)

I'm nervous about going for a 450 and it being too much for me to handle.
I am looking at a Husky FC350 - reading as many reviews as I can as my budget is probably limiting me to a 2017/2018 bike..,I'm worried I might be over thinking it now :)

Have you/anyone had any experience on the Husky FC350?

Thanks
 

truespode

Moderator / Wheelie King
Jun 30, 1999
7,945
242
Thanks for the reply :)

I'm nervous about going for a 450 and it being too much for me to handle.
I am looking at a Husky FC350 - reading as many reviews as I can as my budget is probably limiting me to a 2017/2018 bike..,I'm worried I might be over thinking it now :)

Have you/anyone had any experience on the Husky FC350?

Thanks

Husky FC350 is basically the KTM 350. KTM owns Husky.

Great bikes and I have heard good things about their reliability.

Ivan
 

carlins_leap

Member
Jul 24, 2008
6
0
At 300lbs a 450 is your best choice. You will need to have the springs replaced for your weight but that should be about it until you get enough stamina to really push yourself and the bike.

I'm a big fan of the CRF450 and YZF450 but KTM450's seem to be very popular as well.

Pick a color you like best, replace the springs, wear good gear and have fun.

Ivan
Hi Ivan

Thanks very much for the reply!
 

carlins_leap

Member
Jul 24, 2008
6
0
Husky FC350 is basically the KTM 350. KTM owns Husky.

Great bikes and I have heard good things about their reliability.

Ivan
Ah cool - good to know :)

Do you think a 350 would be enough - I'm only thinking of weekend track days...no racing or anything.
I'm super nervous about investing in a 450 and it being too hot for me to handle...
 

truespode

Moderator / Wheelie King
Jun 30, 1999
7,945
242
The ability to handle a 350 vs a 450 is negligible. When I raced I preferred a YZ250F for woods and a YZ450F for MX but ended up settling on the YZ450F once I put a Rekluse clutch in it. Made woods riding doable with the 450.

In MX there is no replacement for displacement. Both the 350 and 450 have enough power to get you in a lot of trouble. So does a 250 but you will suffer more on long straights and jumps out of a corner than with the 450.

As long as you have good throttle control you will be ok. I was never more than a Vet C Harescramble rider and stayed safe for the most part (relative to others).

In this sport you will get hurt and you will get hurt quick. Doesn't matter what bike you pick. Expect it and do your best to get as good as you can at staying in control with your body position, braking and throttle control as possible. Invest in quality gear and get the suspension setup for your weight and riding conditions (Big jumps or mostly natural terrain tracks, etc.).

This is the best sport in the world.

Ivan
 
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