Riding style in Woods?

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#1
I'm always trying to improve my speed in the tight stuff and I noticed that I can ride, basically two ways.

1. Instead of trying to carry maximum speed through corners and around trees, you use the gas, brake, gas, brake, gas technique. So you would come in to a corner with a lot of speed, slam on the brakes till at a very slow speed, make a short tight turn, then get on the gas hard till the next corner where you do it all again.

2. Instead of tearing around like a mad man you would try to carry as much momentum through corners as posable Your corners would be taken wider and you would be testing traction a little more.

I would guess that a combination would be best but what works best for you guys?


BTW, I couldn't decide if this should have been posted in the riding technique section or the woods section so sorry if I'm wrong.:confused:
 

firecracker22

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#2
My woods riding technique

Hit tree. Crash.
Hit rock. Crash.
Hit log. Crash.
Loop out on uphill. Crash.
Endo on downhill. Crash.
Grab front brakes in corner. Crash.
Go too slow. Crash.
Look at my front fender. Crash.

:think

In all seriousness, when I am riding well, I tend to use the momentum method. Perhaps that's because I haven't learned throttle control yet, not deliberately however.
 

Lemming

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#3
I think that it really depends upon the turns and terrain. I try to maintain a smooth style (like Watts) when the turns allow for it. When I get into areas of sharp turns (with some straight sections inbetween the turns) then I'll brake slide. This latter method works very well when you have someone on your tail because you can roost the heck out of them coming out of the turn ;)
 
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#4
I wave been watching (following) faster riders and it seems that all modern bikes are so close in performance in the straights that it's corner speed that allows one rider to be faster than another.

I try to be as smooth as possible and carry as much speed through the corners as I can. Being smooth also conserves energy.
 

jeb

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#5
I agree with Lemming and 84XRGuy. Smooth where I can, slide where I have to or where it makes sense. Pays off over a long ride/race.

84XR, I'm pretty sure I know who you are. I didn't see you at our trailride. Did you make it down last weekend?
 

fatherandson

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#6
The method of carrying momentum works well for Watts who rides the GNCC and Qualifier type races. I prefer tighter trail and the gas, brake, gas, brake
method works for me. Roosting a riding buddy is a BONUS!:p
 

Timr

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#7
I got my riding technique from the John Cusak movie "Better Off Dead"

Go that way...Really Fast...If something gets in your way...Turn

:confused:
 

WoodsRider

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#8
Go that way...Really Fast...If something gets in your way...Turn
That's good... Now turn! ;)
 

KTM Mike

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#10
Whoops in woods? Technique?

I must admit that firecracker's technique is most like mine!:scream:

My real problem area is the endless sandy whoops here in Michigan (Fatherandson - i am sure you know what I mean!). First i simply am not in good enough shape for the pounding the legs take, and secondly, I am not even sure what technique works best! After the Cherry Pit enduro last weekend I sure was sore - of the 75 miles I would say 65 of them were whoops.

So - any suggestions? I see conflicting advice on the techniqe forum - grip with legs, dont grip, weight centered, weight to the rear.... etc. on the technique forum the comments see to typically relate to short sections of whoops like on a track - not the endless stuff I see in the woods. What works for you guys?
 
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#11
I don't know if it's correct to do this or not but....I stay centered on the bike and I lightly grip the bike with my legs to keep it in a straight line.

I try and keep the front end light, just having the wheel clear the next whoop. I have yet to master the "jumping the whoops" technique, I can't pull myself to try when the trees are so close:eek:
 
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#12
Turning is my problem but when there is a straightway, no matter what the terrain is like, I consider myself to be pretty fast.

On the whoopy stuff I find that griping the tank at all just throws me of balance. Before I get to the rough section I prepare by picking a gear high so I don't have to switch gears while my bike is getting thrown around (Keep in mind I ride a KTM300MXC so I can shift up and still have good power, this might be more difficult on a 125). I also stand up and get my body loose on the bike before I hit the first big bump. I actually widen my legs a little so the bike can float around more.

This is what I do and it works for me.;)
 
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#13
suspention set-up means alot in the whoops , after i matched the springs
on my xr to my weight , and dialed in the clickers , it handles way better in the whoops . i still find myself thinking as i'm riding ; man , this would be
a great trail.... if it wasnt for these damn whoops !
:think
 
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#14
Personally, I find that I always ride better and faster when I use momentum and smoothness through all obstacles. For me the key to speed is confidence and concentration, the goal must be to get from point A to point B as fast as possible w/o crashing. Tight woods often require cut-and-thrust style of riding plain and simple. Cut and thrust can be tiring, but sometimes is the only option. I have found that staying centered on the bike in a relaxed position (using the legs as extra suspension and rowing the bike under me as required) helps in long whoop sections. In shorter section you can keep the front end light and attack, but sooner or later you have to turn. You will find that the whoops aren't as deep at the sides of the trail, but unknown obstacles usually hide in the bushes. It takes confidence to ride on the edges of trail, but you can go faster. Currently I ride a 125 which eats up whoops (for short sections), but wears on me trying keep it on the pipe (and keeping from dropping the front end) mile after mile.
 

HiG4s

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#15
Re: Whoops in woods? Technique?

Originally posted by KTM Mike
I must admit that firecracker's technique is most like mine!:scream:

My real problem area is the endless sandy whoops here in Michigan
Sand whoops, I love sand whoops. And that is a good thing because I use to live in Michigan and I now live in Florida, which has even more sand whoops than Michigan. The technic I always used was stay centered and loose and let the bike move around under me. There seems to be a speed as you are getting faster that becomes very hard to handle, almost uncontrollable. If you go a little faster it smooths out. And if you go just a little faster than that, we're back to Firecracker's method.
What is really getting me is I've been doing some riding on a supercross style MX track and those SX whoops kick my behind.