Storing Vintage Bikes?

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Aug 15, 2007
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#1
I'm going to be putting some of my vintage bikes on display and was wondering if anyone can give me advice on storing them as they won't be running for a little while. The gas has been drained from the tank and carb, the motor has been fogged through the carb and oil has been put down the sparkplug hole. What advice can you give me regarding the cooling system and the transmission. I was planning on filling the transmission/clutch area to the top with oil and filling the cooling system with water as there may be animals near the bikes and I worry if there was an anti-freeze leak that they may drink it and die. Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks
 
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#2
spike444, when my bikes sit for 4 or 5 mounths all i do is top everything up and dont drain the gas at all. I find my float works better if i leave gas in it.
 
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#3
Don't fill it with water.Just flush it out with clean water,then leave it open for a few days so the water can evaporate out,and leave it dry.Plain water will corrode the alloy.Everything else you did is fine,except personally,I would flush out the gearbox/primary with fresh oil,then drain that as well.

Don't even think about leaving gas in them!:yikes:

Cheers!
Bruce
 
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#5
CRazy250, i have never once had problems with leaving gas in my bikes over winter. Especialy the ones with metal tanks. This is just what i do, so it dosent make it the right way but it works for me.
 
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#6
reguardless of what you or me or anybody does, the old oils break down in the gas will eventually turn to varnish.
 
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#8
Gas without premix also will eventually break down into varnish. I've never had a problem over a single winter, but on lawn equipment that sat for a few years, it can get quite thick and gummy. The gas will break down over time, with synth oil, standard oil or no oil.
 
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#10
There are non-toxic antifreeze products available I believe. I would prefer to have something in there to prevent corrosion. Empty would be better than plain water, but antifreeze also has corrosion inhibitors which would help.
 
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#11
You can hang a moisture bag in the garage, this will suck up the moisture and help prevent rusting in areas. I suggest you put a bag over your exaust.
 
Joined
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#13
What about using a gas stabilizer. You don't need to drain the tank. Put some fogging oil into the cylinder head, prop the bike up so there is no weight on the forks, watch the tire pressure and your good to store. This is exactly what the dealers and pro's do here so if its good enough for them its good enough for me.
 
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#14
The best way to prevent corrosion is not to have water in there at all, even with anti-freeze or corrosion inhibitors. Just ask an engineer about boiler lay-up. Short term, a couple of days is usually done wet, filled with water and normal corrosion inhibitors. Longer term, a couple of weeks, is done dry. Very long term is done dry and filled with nitrogen.
 
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#15
Yeah... Leaving gas in it definately makes a mess out oF the old carburetion unit. The bike may still run ,but will probably be a little finnicky. ;)
 
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