Stripped oil drain bolt head

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Aug 25, 2007
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#1
I was gonna drain the oil from my tranny and when i put the socket on it i ended up stripping the head of the bolt because it was so tight. now i have no idea how i can get this stripped bolt out i have tryed using vice grips to grip the head and twist but it just keeps slipping. any ideas ?
 
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Apr 26, 2004
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#2
Well at least the engine cases arent stripped out. Clamp down on the vice grips even harder some how. When you get it out always use new drain washers, when the same one is used over and over it just transfers the force to the threads and thats how the engine case gets stripped. Make sure the sockets you use arent worn out, it happens to me sometimes too :whoa:
 
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Jul 17, 2006
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#3
Get a smaller socket thats an extra. Then hammer or pound in on the stripped bolt. Then put your 3/8s drive on and have fun.
 
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Aug 22, 2004
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#5
Have a 2003 yz250 and had same problem. After rounding the head off I tried vice grips and kept rounding it off even with a freind helping me clap it as tight as possible. Tried grinding the edges with a dremel to get bite anyway I could. Wound up going to the bolt outs and continued rounding the head off until very little was left. Drilled the center and broke the easy out. Luckily I didnt drill all the way thru so i ground it flat and filled with JB weld. Guess the next step is split the case and see where i can go but i was at the point i was afraid an damageing the case so i stoped. Any sugestions on this one guys?
 
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#6
Yeah, I have a suggestion, get a Craftsman Bolt-Out. They really do work very well. In fact, I just skip the wrench all together and use those on my rusty trailer bolts. It also lets you use a bigger wrench than the one that fits the bolt so you can get some extra leverage.

 

Backslayer

Go Big or Go Home
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#7
Heat can be your best friend, if you split the cases your bolt is still going to be in there and youll still have the same problem, I personally recomend and this point go find a LEFT HANDED drill bit, it will have to be cobalt because your trying to cut the bolt and that easy out at the same time if you don't get cobalt youll ruin bits all day that easy out is hardened still, heat the bolt, not the case alot of people say to heat the case but i personally don't recomend that, when you heat the bolt only your bolt will get hot and and free itself 9 times out of 10. good luck hope i helped
 
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#8
I agree with the heat - but do several cycles and 'shock' cool the bolt each time using water to cool it as quickly as possible. The repeated heating/cooling will cause the bolt to expand & contract which will help to break loose any corrosion that may be present.

Although a L/H carbide drill is a viable option, it will be very expensive, especially in L/H. Because of their hardness, they are also very brittle. In a hand drill it will be very easy to chip the flutes or break. Also, keep in mind that most carbides are designed for drilling cast iron, copper, bronze, rubber, plastics, etc. so if you go the carbide route, be sure it's an alloy that's designed for tool steels.

If there's room to get a full bite, I'd try a pipe wrench that's either new, or has fresh jaws, or 'parrot beak' style channel locks if you have any. If not, or if that doesn't work, I'd invest in the Bolt-Outs that GMC recommends as I've had good luck with them most of the time.

Another method that I've had good results with is to weld a larger nut onto the stripped out head. The welding process will get the bolt much hotter than you will with a propane torch which will help break things loose. You then have a fresh nut to turn it off with. Use a 6pt socket or wrench to prevent damaging the new nut.
 

RM_guy

Moderator /
Damn Yankees
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#9
76GMC1500 said:
Yeah, I have a suggestion, get a Craftsman Bolt-Out. They really do work very well. In fact, I just skip the wrench all together and use those on my rusty trailer bolts. It also lets you use a bigger wrench than the one that fits the bolt so you can get some extra leverage.

I have a set of these and while I don't use them very often but when do I need them they are life savers. Well worth the money. :cool:
 
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Apr 18, 2006
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#10
My recommendation is to order up a new drain plug and defer your oil change until you get it. You sure as heck don't want to put that bolt back in!

Rod
 
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#11
Bunya said:
I agree with the heat - but do several cycles and 'shock' cool the bolt each time using water to cool it as quickly as possible. The repeated heating/cooling will cause the bolt to expand & contract which will help to break loose any corrosion that may be present.

Do that only interchange water for WD40. Obviously don't mix wd40 and the torch :) As the wd40 cools the bolt it shrinks. As it shrinks the WD40 will work its way into the threads and help you loosten it.



I end up using that trick all the time on rusty car parts.
 
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#13
mox69 said:
Do that only interchange water for WD40. Obviously don't mix wd40 and the torch :) As the wd40 cools the bolt it shrinks. As it shrinks the WD40 will work its way into the threads and help you loosten it.



I end up using that trick all the time on rusty car parts.
Beeswax also works. Learned that working at the local auto machine shop!

Rotor
 
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Aug 24, 2007
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#14
Using heat is about your only option at this point, the other guys listed some good techniques when using heat to free up bolts.
 
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#15
you could use a dremel tool to grind a slot for a flathead screwdriver, then use an impact screwdriver with the best fitting head to get it out.