Suzuki DR350S Wheel Bearings

BobM

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2001
Messages
2
Likes
0
#1
I am replacing the bearings in my 94 DR350S and find that the spacer tube is about 1/16" longer than the distance between the bearing seats. The Clymer shop manual says to install either front bearing first, install the spacer tube, and then fully seat the other bearing. This is impossible due to the length of the spacer tube. I measured the rear hub spacer tube and it is similarily too long.
I'm at a loss what to do next as if I try to fully seat the bearings the inner races will contact the spacer tube and damage the bearing.
I'm thinking of filing the spacer tubes to be slightly smaller than the distance between the bearing seats but cannot understand why they seem to be too long. I contacted the previous owner yesterday and he confirms the bearings haven't been touched from new (bike had less than 5K miles when I bought it).
Has anyoneexperienced this problem and know what the solution is?
Thanks
Bob
 

EricGorr

Super Power AssClown
Joined
Aug 24, 2000
Messages
708
Likes
1
#2
Maybe the bearing races in the hub have sunk into the hub further than original?
Have you checked with your local Suzuki dealer, maybe it was designed for that type of side clearance?
 

BobM

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2001
Messages
2
Likes
0
#3
Thanks, Eric. I belong to another site (www.odsc.on.ca in Toronto) and asked about this there. I was advised that it is correct for the spacer to be longer than the distance between the bearing seats. The purpose is to prevent side loading on the bearings when tightening the axle. The procedure on installing the bearings is only to press them in (using a Suzuki Bearing Tool) until the inner race contacts the spacer tube. The Clymer Manual is WRONG in advising to fully seat both bearings.

Bob
 

EricGorr

Super Power AssClown
Joined
Aug 24, 2000
Messages
708
Likes
1
#4
That doesn't surprise me that the Clymer manual is wrong. About 5 years ago I approached them about writing their dirt bike manuals, they turned me down because they're a bit cost sensitive. I guess if sales are good enough why should they be concerned with accurate information or quality?
I wonder how many other guys have found fo-paws in their books. Maybe they should start a web forum like this to answer questions about the info in their books?
Naaah! That would be too expensive:confused:
 

SFO

Lifetime Sponsor
Joined
Feb 16, 2001
Messages
2,001
Likes
0
#5
When I make center spacers for hubs, or custom hubs, I will set it up so the center spacer is about.005" longer than the distance betwwen the flanges the bearings locate against. Any less and the spacer gets displaced when you pull the axle out.
There is also one bearing that is normally captured on the outside with either a spanner nut or a circlip.
This is the first brg in and the datum fotr the rest of the wheel.
Center spacer length can be "tuned" to create a less resistance in the wheel.
Along with the amount of press between the hub and the brg, the amount of interference on press in wheel spacers (ala. KTM) sucks up the clearance in the bearing. Creating drag.
All the KTM's I have had, had too much press on the wheel spacers on the wheel bearings. Creating excess drag and eating of bearings.
Installation of the new bearings should include cleaning of the mating surfaces with scotchbrite and lubricating the od of the bearing so the aluminum doesn't gall upon insertion.
After you get the bearing started into the bore, pause for a second and make sure it is going in straight, if it isn't, stop and knock it back out and start again.
Aluminum is forgiving but you can bugger up a hole driving a bearing in crooked, thinking to yourself all the while that it will staighiten out.
These things I learned the hard way.
I had a boss who built Autorace bikes for the Japanese. He didn't consider a wheel ready unless you could blow on it and it would spin.