TV repair

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#1
My TV took a dump today. I turned it on and all that shows up is a line down the middle of the screen. Is this an easy fix or should someone with more knowledge fix this? Should I get it fixed or should I just buy a new TV? Its a Magnavox 27" if that means anything to anybody.

Thanks for any help.
 

scooter1130

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#2
I would suggest replacing the TV.  I have seen 27" TVs on sale for around $250.  Or you could go with a high definition TV since supposedly you will need an HDTV or a converter box by 2006.  that is when all broadcasts are supposed to change to HD, and some stations are using it already along with the standard broadcasting. 
 

Danman

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#3
I would take it in for an estimate. If its under 100 bucks it would be worth it. A while back the FCC said all stations are suposed to turn off the analog signals in few years. A few years back it was slated for 2006. Not sure if it will happen, but a lot of the major markets already offer HD and digital signal. Once people start buying the Digital stuff and the prices will go down and nicer sets will be affordable. Flat screens are coming down quite a bit if you compare the cost to just 2 years ago. If it were me I would put a patch on it and start savin some coin of a nicer one.
 
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#4
TV since supposedly you will need an HDTV or a converter box by 2006.
The mandate is to broadcast digital by 2006. NOT High-Def by 2006. That being said, most networks in OKC are broadcasting at least digital, which allows them to pass thru the network HD feeds, you'd be surprised how many shows are already available in HD. And yes, there is a MAJOR improvement in a HD broadcast. Looking at regualr TV blows.
 

Jaybird

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#5
Our Sony WEGA HDTV (37") threw craps on us.
The repair cost was 1/3 of the total new cost, meaning I just shelled out $500 on the thing.

Ovation is where I purchased it and the sales staff there said they could fix it for about 4 bills. We decided to go with a well respected private TV service.
They laughed at the quote from Ovation......ONE MONTH later and several "We are having trouble figuring this one out" phone calls...and listening to the wife complain...we finally got it back.
Shoulda took it back to Ovation to start with. The older guys don't have a clue, it seems. We are fairly sure they ended up letting an authorized outfit (probably Ovation) fix it and marked it up slightly.

Be sure they know what the heck they are doing before you let them take it!
Be inquisitive about the diagnostic equipment they do or do not have.
 

biglou

#6
kbud-FWIW, I had an older RCA do the same thing on me. I noticed that moving the set around made the line jump back to full-screen. If I set the bottom front of the TV on the lip of the entertainment center, it would hold the picture. When that quit working, I opened it up and very carefully searched out all the solder joints. Sure enough, cold solder joint on one of the large heat sinks attached to one of the boards. Pretty easy fix with a little electical knowledge.
 

Chili

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#7
Originally posted by BigLou
I opened it up and very carefully searched out all the solder joints. Sure enough, cold solder joint on one of the large heat sinks attached to one of the boards. Pretty easy fix with a little electical knowledge.
Same story here for one of our TV's.
 
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#8
I'll check that out, Lou. For safety sake, is there anything I shouldn't touch, like a capacitor?
 

Jon K.

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#9
Not that it is any help, but as I am feeling literate today;

Years ago my TV just up and died. I dug around in the back of it and found a fuse blowed. So (of course) I wrapped the fuse with aluminum foil and stuck it back in. Great results. Good to go.

Couple of weeks later the thing died again. :( Hmmm . . . . I dug around in the back of the thing and found that the on-off switch was no longer passing current. This was so long ago that it actually had a switch, not some new-fangled relay gizmo. So easy enough, I just bypassed the switch, and when I wanted to turn it on or off, I just plugged it in or unplugged it. Great results. Good to go. :)

Warning bells in my head? Naaahhhh!!!!! :confused:

Couple of weeks went by and I came home from work to find a smoking, smoldering TV in my front yard. :eek: The bastid had actually caught fire and the wife threw it out the front door!

The house smelled funny for a couple of weeks, and the wife made me buy a new TV. I got me one of them new color jobs. :thumb:
 

biglou

#10
Kbud-As a general rule, I try not to touch anything on the inside that I don't have to, and always work one-handed when working inside the box. If you're right handed, put your left arm behind your back while you are checking boards or soldering. Also, release any static electricity you have built up by touching a doorknob or something before you start wiggling circuit boards looking for cold solder joints. A magnifying glass helps here, too. If you find a cold joint, chances are all you'll have to do is put sufficient heat to it and it will set itself back. Shouldn't have to add much or any solder or anything.

Overall, use basic common sense and you will be fine.
 

zio

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#11
Originally posted by BigLou
Overall, use basic common sense and you will be fine.
Who has time for that? I can hardly wait to unplug something before I'm jamming a fork around in it to jump start it.
 

BadgerMan

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#12
Man, be careful if you decide to mess around inside that TV. You don't even have to touch the wrong component since 10,000 volts will produce an arc that will jump an inch of air. The transformer that supplies power to the picture tube produces that, and then some. Always keeping one hand behind your back or in your pocket is great advice. You never want to chance creating a circuit with your arms since your heart is right there in the middle!
 
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#13
Well, I messed around with the connections, put it back together and the thin line on the screen is now about a half an inch wide. I went back and checked them again but the line stayed the same. Thanks for the advice badger, I've been wondering if this is a bad idea and I am very nervous about the whole thing. Does anyone have an idea of where a loose conection might be?
The volume doesn't change either if that helps. I looked at the wires going from the control to the board, but they looked tight.
Thanks again.