Wheelie while standing...

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Aug 2, 2006
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#1
Although i'm riding 6 years now i can easily do wheelies while seated but i can't do it while standing. Last time i tried i fell off badly. Is it because i'm too tall?(6.5) or i have a bad throttle control? Any help will be appreciated
 
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#2
Same here, it doesnt bother me though. I can shift easily sitting whereas i can when standing. Its the same thing on a bicycle too, i can wheelie forever sitting, but not standing.
 
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#3
standing is much more easy and sitting you need to put more effert into if you do a wheelie standing all you have to do is pull the front end up "trhottle control" and as far as shifter goes in a stand up wheelie i havent wuit figured it out yet?
 
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#4
Well you have to learn throttle control and the balance point will help you in learning to ride a wheelie on a bike. If you’re ready to learn then 1. Make sure the rear brake works and adjust the lever to a comfortable height. 2. There should be 1in. of play in chain slack. A chain too tight or too loose will wear out the chain and sprockets faster than normal. 3. Make sure there are no cracks in the foot pegs, and make sure all of the bolts are tight. Normal stuff before you ride just check the bike over. Now that you have checked the bike over have some throttle control and know where your balance point is on a sit down wheelie, its time to stand up.
I recommend clutch wheelies, Close the throttle, and then pull the clutch in all the way, with one finger. Then twist the throttle and dump the clutch.
When learning to clutch, only rev up the engine a little bit at first before letting out the clutch. This will give you the feel for clutching. Then gradually increase the rpm’s before dumping the clutch, until the front end jumps up close to the balance point. Reduce the throttle as the front end comes up to the balance point. If it comes up too far, gently push the rear brake to bring the bike back forward. When clutching second and third gear wheelies, the bike may need extra help, depending on what bike it is. If clutching alone doesn’t get the wheelie up, then bounce at the same time. This is done by pushing down on the bike (with your arms and legs) at the same time you open the throttle, and then leaning back slightly when dropping the clutch. I is not a good idea to pull on the bars. Pulling up on the bars may cause the wheelie to come up funny and wobble.
Last but not least Practice Practice Practice
 

High Lord Gomer

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#5
FmXMikeR said:
I recommend clutch wheelies, Close the throttle, and then pull the clutch in all the way, with one finger. Then twist the throttle and dump the clutch.
That would seem to be a very hard way to consistently bring the front up because you've got the clutch pulled for too long. One time you might give it enough throttle to bring it up one foot and the next you might go just a hair harder and loop it out.

I learned clutching it up on a street bike and the way I was told made it easier to be consistent. At low-to-mid RPMs give it some throttle to start accelerating. Just after you've started accelerating, use 1 finger and pull the clutch in a little. The RPMs will rise and the front will come up when you release the clutch. At first, you start with a quick tap of the clutch and the front end might not even leave the ground. As you get more comfortable with it, you'll start accelerating harder and pulling the clutch farther and for longer...all 3 of which will bring the front up quicker and farther.

Before you ever get to the balance point, practice feeding in some rear brake to control it. You don't want to wait until you're almost on your back to stomp on the rear brake and yank your arms out of their sockets (yes...guilty).
 
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#6
When i do a stand up wheelie, ill put my foot under the shifter lever so i can shift, push down on the handle bars to compress front forks, as they come back up give it thorttle to lift the front wheel And use yur balnace and thorrttle to keep it going.. when u need the next gear. yur foots all ready to shift so just slip it into gear dont use the clutch and thats how i do them standing up.
 
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#7
I'm still practicing but the problem is that everytime i stand and try to lift the front tire my body goes back as the bike wheelie and my hand is stack with the throttle open so the result is...backflip :bang:
 
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#8
mex_ros said:
I'm still practicing but the problem is that everytime i stand and try to lift the front tire my body goes back as the bike wheelie and my hand is stack with the throttle open so the result is...backflip :bang:


Well then before you start the wheelie make sure you grip the right handlebar further down (move your wrist towards the ground before you touch the throttle). Also, try to grip the bike with your legs.



On the other hand, maybe you just weren't meant to do wheelies :)
 
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#9
I weigh 125lbs and I do throttle wheelies while sitting down on my rm250. No clutch no pulling at all. If I try to wheelie while standing I will flip. Im pretty much spoiled.