which brands uses twin chambres

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#1
hi all,
i was trying to figure out whether wp uses twin chambres and which brands further more are into them.
Are there still brands that just go for only a damping cartridge and do they work as perfectly as twins?
My marzocchi does not have a twin chambres etc
Must we all go for the twins or what?
 
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#2
Georgie
At this stage Honda and Suzuki are using the Twin Chamber forks in off the shelf motorcycles to my knowledge (MX only). Bitubo produced an early innefficient example on the Moto Guzzi LeMans. I would also suspect the Ohlins Superbike forks with the external nitrogen reservoirs are also TCs. Don't worry about the Marzzochis. I'll have more time to sit down and explain the best performance options for you tonight.
Regards
Terry
 

marcusgunby

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#3
As far as i know the wps with the TCs are the works bikes-ive also heard the works mazzos on the gp bikes were TCs-i doubt we will see inside any to find out:(, but the caps tend to give the game away and some do look like TCS.
 
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#4
What do they look like, these GP roadrace forks. I have seen them with the look alike shockreservoir attached to the legs. They run only 100mm of travel so is it possible that they have a shock layout inside with a piston nitro/oil in the reservoir, and fully oil filled legs?
 

marcusgunby

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#5
Sorry not the road race, i was talking of the MX gp bikes.They have a huge outer nut(that unscrews from the outer fork tube) and a large inner nut like on a cr fork.
 
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#6
okee, sorry, offcourse you were talking dirt here. But still, do these roadbikes use forks like shockabsorbers?
 

svi

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#8
The gas charged Ohlins road race forks have a sealed cartridge system. Oil displaced by the damper rod passes through the compression piston in a housing usually in front of the fork leg (sometimes behind) and into a nitrogen charged cylinder above rather than back in to the fork. The cylinder has a floating piston seperating the oil and nitrogen so it works just like a shock absorber. Bottoming resistance works just the same by oil height in the main fork tubes. The forks have proven to give a more consistant damping action but the gas pressure causes problems with extention forces.
 
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#9
svi, you mean that the rebound is the difficult part here? Pls explain some more if possible.
 

svi

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#10
The gas pressure acts against the damper rod, if you remove the spring from a shock, back the rebound right off and push the shaft in it will extend again as soon as you take the pressure off the shaft, this is the extension force.
When braking for a turn the forks compress as the weight is transfered to the front of the bike, as the brakes are eased off to enter the turn the front of the bike will lift as the load imposed upon the forks by the cornering forces is not as great as the braking force. The more you can keep the forks compressed through the turn the less trail you have so the bike responds to steering inputs quicker and easier. With the gas forks the extension force was making the forks extend quicker and ride higher when the brakes were released. Increasing the rebound was giving problems in other areas so they are running real long top out springs to hold the forks down in the stroke.