Front disc cover??

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#1
Can any of you recommend a good plastic front disc cover for a KTM 300.

I have heard bad things about the Acerbis cover...breaking/fit etc...etc..

Thanks.

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(formerly XR44ME) Rick

'00 KTM 300 MX/C
 

rda

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#2
i started with the acerbis on my 01 300, after the mount broke for the 3rd time i sent it back for a refund and got a devol aluminum guard. it has been working great so far.

[This message has been edited by rda (edited 03-12-2001).]
 
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#3
Rick,

What do you think of this crappy winter?? I had the Acerbis on my 300 EXC and it broke off after a month. It doesn't hold up to the rocks and roots of New Hampshire. Let us know what you get and how it works out.
 

TexKDX

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#4
Arlis broke his ('01 200) on the first ride.

The new Acerbis guard is a POS. The brittle plastic mounting spyder is a joke.
 
- a d v e r t i s e m e n t -

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#6
The Acerbis guard itself is OK, its the spyder thats trash. They sent me a new one made of different plastic, but I havn't tried it yet. I'm also having one made of aluminum.

Glenn
'00 GasGas XC250
 
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#7
Why? What are you hoping to protect? Plastic will just keep a little dirt or sand out of the rotor, same with aluminum except that with the latter it can bend against your rotor and cause more danmage.Non of them are going to protect the caliper. Isn't the rotor designed to expel dirt any way ?

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Ride The Pumpkin
 

jeb

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#8
Mag,
The caliper is behind the fork leg so it's pretty well protected without any guards. The plastic guards will still keep minor knicks and dings of the rotor and keeping mud, sand, whatever off the rotor is always better than having it in there, IMO. The new KTM rotor does clear it out okay but mud will still pack up in the cooling slots and wear your pads out a lot faster.



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John Brunsgaard - JEB
 
- a d v e r t i s e m e n t -

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#9
I agree with Mag Racer. I installed the cheese mount Spider on my bike while thinking "wonder how long is this going to to hang?". It's managed to stay attached so far, but once it's gone I'm not going to replace it. As far as impact goes, it's like putting a bra on the front of a tank. May look nice, but not doing much.
 

TexKDX

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#10
Originally posted by MAG Racer:
Why? What are you hoping to protect? Plastic will just keep a little dirt or sand out of the rotor, same with aluminum except that with the latter it can bend against your rotor and cause more danmage.Non of them are going to protect the caliper. Isn't the rotor designed to expel dirt any way ?

The enduro computer sensor and cable for one.

It also helps keep mud and sand off the disk which helps with pad and disk life. The grime on the surface has to be scraped off and pushed into the vents; the disk doesn't magically dispurse the stuff.

It also acts as a deflector when hitting objects. Filling in the square edge between the fork leg and the disk helps the front end glance off things it might otherwise hang on. The Acerbis kit for my '99 WP50s also covers both fork legs. Too bad the USD one is such a problem.

Bottom line IMO, the more guards the better. The first rule of placing well in an enduro is FINISHING the enduro, so protecting essential components is paramount. Obviously Kevin Hines agrees, otherwise E-Line would not exist.

TexKDX.
 
- a d v e r t i s e m e n t -

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#11
Fair enough. IMO it seems that some protective pieces don't really do much, so when damage does occur you are out the cost of the part plus the protective piece.You could probably by a few sets of pads for what a nice carbon fiber disc gaurd costs.

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Ride The Pumpkin
 
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#12
They do a good job of keeping sticks and brush from taking out the sensor wires. In my earlier reply, I ment I was having a spyder mount made from aluminum, not the whole guard.

Glenn
'00 GasGas XC250
 

TexKDX

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#13
OK, for your type and place of riding you feel you don't need a disk cover, Mag racer. Understood.

Brake disks are very strong in one plane and flimsy in the other. Anything one can do to keep side loads off of it is worth doing if one rides fairly harsh offroad conditions with logs, stumps, rocks, limbs, vines, etc. Even on good clean trails an off-trail excursion can put the disk into something that will side load and bend the thing. A small tree wedged between the fork and the disk is all it takes to whack it out of round.

As to questioning the strength of Kevin's carbon parts, obviously you haven't had the stuff in your hands or on your bike. They are amazingly tough, independent of their light weight, plus they are extremely light weight to boot. Aesthetics are a matter of taste and I find them almost works of art. Kevin comes from a family of inventors/engineers/entrepreneurs that holds many patents dating back several generations. Ever hear of Pro Flex (now K2) bicycles? His brother and a partner designed the bikes, built the business, and sold to K2. The E-Line carbon accessories are quite reasonably priced considering the engineering and manufacturing behind them, not to mention the cost of running a business with such a limited market compared to sneakers or golf clubs.

The suggestion that the front disk guard is a frivolous accessory may be your opinion, but a rather uninformed one in MY opinion. The original post asked for disc guard suggestions as in what to get, not whether or not he needed one.