Adjusted rant

HiG4s

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#1
After a couple of weekends of riding I decided I was to the point I wanted to do some maintenance and adjustments on my 99 Husky 125. What a pain. I got the bike up on a stand and loosened the drain plug, it is off center and hits the frame. It will come out with a little wiggling but to put it back you need to have the threads in exactly the right position to let it clear the frame. Putting the drain plug back in only took me 45 minutes. To adjust the shock preload I had to remove the subframe (seat, air box, rear fender, muffler mount). Then I had to reassemble it before I could measure to see if I adjusted it enough. I don't know how long it took, but it's close enough. Then the compression adjustments need a special tool (or pliers if tool is unavailable) because they are so hard to turn. And the rebound adjustment screw is not visable unless you have the rear end compressed about 3 inches. OK got that done and went to the front. Rebound is right on top easy to get to, but the compression is on the bottom and you have to lay on your back on the ground to see them. Ok got that done. The bike has much better low than I expected and great top but it stumbles in the middle. I decided to drop the needle one clip spot. Have to either remove the carb or the tank to get to the screws that hold the slide in. I went with the carb. Mikuni flat slides seem to be a little tricky to disassemble. Getting the throttle cable out of the slotted screw that holds the needle was becoming too much and I was about to give up when the thing popped out sending the throttle spring flying. After retrieving the parts, changing the clip and reassembling it is all back together and ready to go. It's been a while since I've had a bike but I swear my old 89 KTM 250 was much eaiser to do maintenance on. Are all the new bikes this much of a pain?
 
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#2
I think it is just that you are not used to working on your new bike. Before i got my 99 300 MXC I worked on my XR200 with great ease, but when i got my new Katoom I too went through some ofthe difficulties you are talking about........and still am! It is gradually getting easier and easier though.

KaTMandoo
 

bud

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#3
I was surprised how easy my husky was to work on. Re the shock compression adjuster, ask your local shop. The proper adjuster is a very cheap piece of plastic.

I usually take the carb right off to change the jetting. It takes all of 30 sec. And it's not necessary to remove the tank, though if it was, it's only held on by one bolt anyway. One tip, replace the 3 phillips head screws on the carb with hex screws. Makes life much easier :).
 

TexKDX

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#4
Originally posted by HiG4s
To adjust the shock preload I had to remove the subframe (seat, air box, rear fender, muffler mount). Then I had to reassemble it before I could measure to see if I adjusted it enough. I don't know how long it took, but it's close enough.
Try a long punch and a hammer on the preload. Getting a wrench on most modern bikes is impossible without removing the subframe. Get at it from the side. Keep an eye on the tip so you don't drive it onto the threads on the shock.

Also try T handles or a 1/4" speed wrench and sockets for all the bodywork hardware. It is standard practice these days to pull all the bodywork before doing anything to the bike. Have a tube of loc-tite blue around for reassembly as well to keep from losing fasteners. If any fasteners go into brass inserts in plastic then grease these instead of loc-tite. You should be able to strip it down and put it back together in about 4 minutes. You'll get good at it.:)
 
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#5
Re: Re: Adjusted rant

Originally posted by TexKDX

Try a long punch and a hammer on the preload.
Yeah sure. Beat the crap out of it until it's mangled. One of my personal favorites when I look at a used bike. No thanks! :silly:


Originally posted by TexKDX

Getting a wrench on most modern bikes is impossible without removing the subframe.
Wow! You've actually adjusted the preload on most modern bikes. Amazing. How do you do it all ... :confused:
 

TexKDX

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#6
Gee, thanks plonker for adding so much to the thread. Your insight is most helpful. I'm sure if you follow me around like a puppy you'll find more to ridicule.

What ever floats your boat I say. This coming from one who actually owns and rides a Plonker BTW. '72 MAR to be exact.
 

HiG4s

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#7
I really don't care to use the punch method, but to save pulling the subframe I had already tried it and don't have enough room between the shock and resevior to get the neccessary angle for that to work either. The next problem I have is that the radiator hose is too close to the plug to use a standard socket style trail plug wrench so I now carry a small cresent wrench in my trail pack. I also am worried that the power valve cover is so close to the frame that I may have to pull the engine to clean them, but I haven't tried yet and that is for another day.