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CFR150r expert...moto class suggestions

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Sep 24, 2007
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#1
I bought my son a 150r expert, and we love it, however, he wants to race it. We raced today (never raced before) and he got put into the supermini class because his bike is a big wheel. He's been riding a cr80 for the last couple years, and he is just getting to big for it. The 150 is a much better fit. Now the problem...this supermini class is fast. My son got lapped both motos, and finished dead last both motos. He is comfortable riding, but it has always been open field suff, this was his first weekend on a track, and he is struggling with jumps and holeshots, although I'm not to concerned about this, it'll come with time. He wants to bring his 80 next time so he can at least enter a beginner class. I think it's a good idea just so he can get more seat time, but several people at the track told me it's a bad idea to have him run a 2 stroke *and* a 4 stroke. I want him to have fun, and I know it's no fun getting smoked every time out. I'm worried he will just get tired of always being last, and just want to give it up. What do you guys think?
 
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Mar 26, 2007
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#2
Personally I think I would leave it up to him.

I honestly don't think there is anything wrong with trading seat time between a 2-stroke and 4-stroke. If anything it will only make your son a better, more varied rider. If your son was a super fast A rider, hoping to goto loryetta lynns, I would say stick with one bike all year. But it sounds like you are just getting into this sports competitive side. A lot of riders around here would say that 4-strokes are "easier" to ride and everyone should start off on a 2-stroke.

Next time you go to the track, bring both bikes and if possible let him race in both classes. Or maybe bring both, but plan on entering the 2-stroke, so he can get a taste of both classes. At least make sure he watches whatever class he doesn't decide to race in so he can get a feel for the overall speed difference.

Just remember, your there to have fun. Now that hes finished dead last, he can't get any worse :) Don't set expectations to win, just set expectations to improve each time you go out there.

Also, going to a track when they have open practice will help a lot more than a race. I have learned a lot more from open practice, when I can do things on my terms (not 4 laps ballz out), than I have from the races I've entered.
 
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Sep 24, 2007
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#3
Cool, thanks for the reply. That's exactly the way I look at it. After they posted results, I showed him the 12th place rider and told him that he needed to set his sights on that kid, and not worry about how fast the other kids are. He took everything in good spirits so I was pretty happy about that. He commented during the 50 class that maybe he should run with the little kids...then the first place rider came by and skied over a jump and he said "well, I couldn't hang with *him*, but theres a couple out there I could beat". I know he'll get better, it's just frustrating to me because I've never raced mx, so I don't know what to tell him, other than to have fun. I'm getting frustrated just trying to get him to feather the clutch on starts and not dump it...Anyway, thanks for the nod.

-Curt
 
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Apr 28, 2007
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#4
Curt,

How old is your boy?

I once went to a coaching clinic and got the best parenting advice I've ever received when it comes to kids in sports.
The three best things a parent can do/say when a kid is in any sport are the following:
1.) Provide them with opportunities to do what they love (or try new things).
2.) Tell them to have fun.
3.) Tell them how much you enjoy watching them have fun. (Unconditionally.) Sometimes this might mean feigning ignorance as much as possible.

Because I coached runners, when my kids played soccer I was the dumbest soccer mom out there. I knew nothing about the sport, and made sure it stayed that way. As a result I was never critical, never "worried" about whether they were having fun or getting beat. They didn't have to satisfy my competitive urges or live for my approval.

Likewise, it allows them the joy of telling you what they know, and to grow masterful at it.

Anytime you are more worried about your kid getting beat than they are, you know your priorities are getting slightly out of line. It sounds like your little guy is evaluating his options on his own on how to be competitive and that he IS having fun. As Mox said, leave it up to him. If you over orchestrate it, you are living your own competitive desires through your kid. You should maybe just saddle up yourself and get that out of your system! It's not too late for you to start racing.

As long as you are giving him opportunities to both train and race, you are doing your job! He's lucky to have such an interested parent. He'll be fine. It's a helluva lot of fun, whether you are first or last. I'm guessing it is pretty much addicting enough on it's own level he won't get too discouraged.

Lastly, If you are determined to "help him" there are other ways to structure goals without getting too hung up on winning or even place. The skills are everything. As he masters the skills he'll become more competitive. Sometimes it's about catching the guy in front of you, sometimes it can just be about riding to the best of your ability. Don't rush him by getting hung up on place. Let him develop. Undoubtedly he's already hooked. I think if you got out there and did a bit of racing yourself, you wouldn't have so much restless energy to worry about his starts. Your adrenaline will be spent on your own races!
 
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#5
CurtM220 said:
I don't know what to tell him, other than to have fun.
This is the most important thing for you to remember, and one of the last two things that I say to my son before every gate drop, the other is "be careful". Make sure that you never forget that the fun is more important than an 8 dollar plaque or trophy.

As Mox said, take him to the track on practice days. He will have an opportunity to ride with other kids, some of whom should be near his speed. He may even meet a few that can help him to improve his skills. It is not unusual for an older rider to befriend a kid and help out a little. We were at a local track one day and a couple of teens saw my son riding and felt like he should be clearing a double that he regularly came up a little short on, so they started talking to us, and encouraged him to hit it a little harder. One of them even went after a video camera. Well, he didn't get the chance to clear the jump that day, due to a small but painful accident, but we still hang out with one of the two teens quite a bit, he's a good kid, and my boy likes him. The other has been out with a knee injury so we haven't seen him in a while.
 
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Sep 24, 2007
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#6
Thanks for the replies guys. It sounds like I'm on the right track. Dirtmom...my son is 14, so he riding with kids that are *much* better. But I think he has the right attitude anyway. He's really never been a very aggressive kid, so I know it's take him alot of practice before he starts hitting the jumps, which is fine, I just don't want him to give up on it to early because he's getting disappointed. When he gets home from school today we are going to go out behind the house and practice holeshots in the field. He doesn't like them to much yet.
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
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#7
He sounds like he has a really great attitude!! He's lucky to have such a willing playmate and vice versa. As a coach you'd be surprised how many times I've heard parents complain because their kids won't do stuff with them, even though they share the same interests.

You guys are gonna have a blast. I'd give my eye teeth and my left leg for a backyard I could step out and practice in!!

Have fun!
 

Jasle

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#8
don't worry about getting lapped. when we started racing we'd get lapped twice in the first moto. many places let you run the 12-13 class with the small wheel 150. you could invest in some wheels and swap them for a while? Otherwise your SOL.

But riding with the fast kids does raise the bar and the kids either quite...or get fast quicker.
We usually race the first moto and set the goal of beating two of the guys ahead of you. getting one better spot is usually easy. getting 2 spots makes em work.
I've seen several guys ride both and it does not seem to affect them. We ride the jr and supermini class. we do well in jr class but get killed in the supermini. but track time is track time IMO.
 
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#9
Sweet, I just hope everyone we're going to be "racing" with has the same attitude as you guys. I was half expecting someone to comment about my son being out there and holding things up...didn't happen though. We went to practice tonight and I put him on a side track where he was the only one. We just worked on cornering and getting into the throttle while in the turn. He's doing better, but he did go "through" a couple turns. We worked on 2nd gear holeshots this afternoon, and I think he is a lot more confident now. As we were leaving the track tonight he said he feels like he will do a lot better next time out. I told him as long it remains fun, he'll get faster.
 

Jasle

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#10
people don't usually complain about holding traffic up as long as your rider maintains his line. make sure he does not pull over for someone. just keep his line as he's getting passed. this makes for safer racing because he's predictable. the faster kids know how to pass. they just need to know your rider is going in a straight line. its tough trying to figure out which way he's pulling over this time.