Gas Gas Break In

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Oct 25, 1999
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#1
So my two month wait is quickly coming to an end with my XC200 arriving this Friday. I understand that Gas Gas runs the bike at the factory. Should that be taken into account? What is the recommended break in procedure?

Jim at Smackover said all the bearings/pivots should be well greased and to simply check the spokes and the clearance between the pipe/silencer joint and the Ohlins shock.

What's left? Tranny oil and premix?
 
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#2
The bikes use forged pistons, let it warm up throughly before riding. Heat cycle the engine a few times, then ride easy, let it cool, and repeat. Get a tank of fuel through it before really reving it out under load. The jetting will probably be rich, leave it that way for break in, then adjust as neccessary. Done this way the top end should last a season easy with clean filters and good oil. I run Amsoil 2000 @ 40:1, but Motul, K2 are good as well. The GasGas clutch/transmission is kind of finicky about oil. Spectro 80wt. gives the best performance in these bikes. Mine came with what looked like ATF (very thin). I drained it immediately and refilled with the Spectro. So far (about a year) this is the smoothest, most durable 2-stroke motor I've ever had. Linkage is well greased and sealed well.

A few heads up items: Check that the rear pipe mount bolt is not touching the fuel tank. I made a plastic insert to prevent this. Route the trans vent and a pair of carb vents to the airbox if hit any water crossings. The seat bolts don't line up with the insert nuts in the seat mounts unless the seat is forced down and foward slightly. Like any new bike, antiseize and locktite bolts and check wire routing for possible chafing problems.

The bike may be quite stiff before the suspension breaks in. Give it about 100-200 miles. I think WER consulted on the '01 valving, so it should be good for the woods. Good Luck!

Glenn
'00 GasGas XC250
 
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#3
new bike paranoia

Thanks Glenn. I should be finally ready to kick it over on Saturday. Maybe it's because I have had so many problems getting everything to come together but I am super paranoid I am going to blow the bike up. I will be religious in providing plenty of warm up time before heavy load.

Did you break in the motor using the same oil/fuel ratio that you run now?

Since I got the bike in a crate directly from GGNA I have a few curious parts that you might be able to identify. In the bag of front fender bolts there was a threaded fitting that would be used to attach a fuel/vent hose to. Any ideas?

Also with the silencer mounting hardware there is a funny green fiberous washer about an 1" in diameter that I am not sure what to do with. I am using the allen bolts included to run through the rear fender to hold one end of the silencer and a second shorter allen bolt through a tab a few inches down the subframe behind the side number plate. Are you using metal washers there?
 

gasgasman

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#4
ultrachrome.
The threaded fitting is for the power valve chamber drain. If you look on the front of the p/v chamber you'll see an allen head bolt. You have to remove that and screw the threaded fiting into it. I don't know if you leave it in or not.
The s/a bolts have washers on the inside where it holds the fenders on. Enjoy your new sled ;)
 
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#5
Do I need to attach a hose and route it?

On the s/a I was thinking there sould be a washer between the allen head and the frame mounting point. I have the allen bolt going through the mounting tab into the small end of the metal gromet/washer thingy and into the nut.
 
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#6
Don't vent the left powervalve chamber. Its a closed resonance chamber, and the bolt is used to drain spooge. I never even got a fitting with my bike. The right side cover has a vent fitting and hose which also serves as the trans vent. I routed this to the top of the airbox (its long enough) so it can't draw water during river crossings.

The fiber washer is an insulator that goes between the pipe bracket and the rubber vibration isolator. I took mine out, as it adds to the clearance problem, and that part of the pipe doesn't get that hot anyway. Pay attention to the pipe mount clearance or you can wear a hole in the fuel tank!

The FMF pipes and silencers are a close fit on the bikes. The stinger comes close to the shock resovior. The silencer is mounted under some tension when bolted up to the subframe. Everything pulls in fine when the bolts are tight though. This is an FMF dimmension problem and the same on all bikes, as the Messico pipes and silencers fit perfect.

Just run a normal premix, and heat cycle the bike a few times without loading it too hard. Good Luck!

Glenn
'00 GasGas XC250
 
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#8
The pipe showed up along with the guards and the Scott's triple clamp/pro-taper/damper combo. Only thing missing is the e-line pipe guard.

Mounting the pipe and silencer was a real trick. No trimming required but it did take some persuasion. You can still see just the edge of the last o-ring on the top but it doesn't seem to leak.

And after a lot of waiting and anguish I finally got a chance to kick it over. Did two heat cycles today and did a few slow laps around the block. Next I'll check the spokes and bolts, mount the scotts system and practice some starts in my neighbor's yard. Yee haw!
 
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#9
The silencer is a tight fit to the subframe, but the pipe should fit on the exhaust flange fine and eaisly clear the o-rings. I would ckeck this again. Mount the pipe on the cylinder first, add the silencer, and last tighten everthing up.