KDX Bogs

Joined
May 9, 2001
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#1
I have a 2000 KDX220 and recently changed to a Gnarly pipe and turbine core II silencer.
The bike ran great for about 2 weeks. Then it started to bog down when hot. Then it
started to bog all the time cold or hot. It did seem to get worse as it got hotter. I recently
put in a new mechanical seal in the water pump thinking the waterpump was going bad.
The bike still bogged. If I open it up it will bog then go like heckl. I took the carb off and cleaned
it completely and bent the float tang out a little bit. This seemed to clear up the problem.
It still bogs a tiny bit but the bike is 150% better than it was. If the float is lessening the
amount of fuel will it seize the motor? Is the mod I made the right one? Should I bend the tang
a hair more to make up for the tiny bit of bog?
Thanks in advance.
 

NDRO

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Joined
Jan 6, 2001
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#2
Re-Jet??

Did you?? You need to jet down after making these changes.

After adding a FMF Turbine Core II, Torque Pipe, and drilling my airbox lid, I ended up jetting down one on my main and pilot, and dropping my needle down on notch.

It went from a bike that couldn't pull top gear, to a bike that was happy where ever I was running it as far as RPM's.

I live in Northern IL, at about 1100' or so above sea level.

Check your plug.. If it's black and oily, you need to rejet.
 
Joined
Oct 14, 1999
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#5
Lowering the fuel level will result in a leaner (more lean?) mix. A too-lean mix caused by anything can result in your bike being blowed-up. A mm or two drop in the fuel level generally wouldn't make a HUGE difference..but as already said..

REJET!

You just HAVE to do that!

As far as 'running great for two weeks'... this is the time of year (around here anyway) that temperature swings can be BIG! Maybe two weeks ago it was quite a bit cooler? Cooler temps require richer jetting. Likewise, warmer temps require leaner jetting.

Changing the float level is NOT how you tune your carb. Your PWK has multiple circuits, each of which has to be properly tuned for best response. CDave's article is excellent!