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Probably bought too much bike - show stopper?

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Oct 4, 2007
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#1
Hi all,

I am new to the world of dirt bikes but not new to street riding. A friend sold me a 1994 YZ-250 and I've been told by many that it is way too much bike for me.

While this may be so, if I take it easy and learn slowly, can I assume that I can grow into the bike? I paid less than $1k and it is in really good shape. It just seemed like a shame to shell out 2x that to try the dirt.

My plan is to ride fire trails for some time and just get the feel of the bike. I will then slowly transition to some dirt.

I don't typically have a heavy had on the throttle so I feel like I can use this bike without too much risk. I also have a manual on order to understand the mechanics and do complete maintenance before using the bike.

I'm just looking for some opinions as to whether I talking any sense here or dif I screwed up with this purchase?

Thanks for any insight,

Marley
 
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#2
I guess it depends on what kind of street experience you have.

My old 250 could out accelerate my 636.

You also have to worry about the sudden hit and loss of traction with a 250.


After saying that, if you take it easy you should be fine. Just take it easy until you get used to it.
 

RM_guy

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#3
Yeah, take it easy and you'll be fine. Use your head and don't let anyone (including yourself) talk you into doing something that you don't feel comfortable doing. Read up on all you can about proper technique and practice, practice, practice.

And definitely wear all the proper gear :nod:
 
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#4
Thanks guys,

I really appreciate the help.

I also hear that a 12-tooth front gear will also tame some of the quick throttle response (flatten out the power band).

Any thoughts on that?

Thanks again,

Marley
 

RM_guy

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#5
What size gear is stock? Personally I wouldn't mess with the gearing. You could make the gearing taller (smaller rear or larger front sprocket) and that would force the motor to work harder to get started which would make it seem to pull less but there will be times when you wish you had the lower gearing, especially in the woods. Eventually you may want to go even lower on the gearing to keep it from stalling when it gets tight or you are on a hill at slow speeds.

In any case the gearing will not change the power band. It will only change what part of the power band is being used at any particular bike speed. Try to get used to the bike the way it is and then decide on gearing changes after you have mastered the basics.
 

High Lord Gomer

Poked with Sticks
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#6
If I recall correctly, the 94 came stock with a 13 tooth front sprocket. A 12 would make it accelerate even quicker and make you shift a lot more often, at the expense of some top end speed. I would stick with a 13. A 14 would stretch each gear out a little further, but you lose some of the overlap of the gears when you do that.

The 94 YZ was a great bike and if you respect it, it should be fine for you.
 
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#7
smarley said:
While this may be so, if I take it easy and learn slowly, can I assume that I can grow into the bike?
Yes. Soon it will feel very natural. Take time to learn and get a good feel of the bikes temperment. But even with that said, it will always suprise you at times
 
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#8
just give it time. you will grow into it.

a heavier flywheel will help with the torquey ness ( is that a word) of it some.

just take it easy and dont go above your limits
 

maxrevs666

totally rocktacular
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#9
the main problem i had was getting used to how a 2 stroke delivers the power, it caught me unawares a few times and i had the motor die / fould the plug while trying to go slowly, on the flipside I nearly soiled my trousers a few times when the bike suddenly hit the band. Final point is Im 5'5" tall and everyone said that i was too small to be riding period. - Moral of the story - go at your own comfortable pace and be selective with who gives you advice. a lot of "veteran" riders have a slightly unwelcoming attitude to newbies, whilst forgetting they were once in the same position.
 
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#10
all i know is that other than a 1970 trail 90, i learned on a 95 yz250(basically the same bike)just take it easy at first, youll get used to it, and cripes man is it a fun sport! have fun
 
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#11
If you ride trails for a day, you'll get used to
the 2 stroke power curve.
2 strokes feel like they have turbos, in
my opinion. :)

It's great beginners bike I think. Allot of torque for those hill climbs.
 

Rooster

Today's Tom Sawyer
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#12
I did something similar when I decided I was tired of putting around on my RT180 ... I bought a YZ250. I regretted it for about the first three rides, then realized I just needed to get used to it. Before too long I was having an absolute blast on that bike. That was back in 1990. I have no regrets!

You will get used to it. Like the others said, take your time and enjoy the learning curve. :)
 
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#13
Leave it stock and just be as smart as you can when you twist that throttle.

If your not sure, then back off. Yes, with enough time anyone can grown into a bike. And if they play it smart, that growing will not involve any trips to the emergency room.
 
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#14
i actually started maybe a month ago, i bought a 99 cr250r. like said previous to this, it will surprise you. ive had it come off the ground many times on me. which isnt unexpected. watch what your riding on, if its roots dont be going along the trail and, hammer the bike over some roots. it could grip and flip, or take off. maybe thats never happened, idk. its just something i try not to do. just be carefull. like said before, get the correct gear.
 
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#15
I am starting out on a 250 2t also. I had ridden many other bikes but never a 2t. Everybody I ride with hates it or is afraid of it but I have no problems with the powerband. After about 2 minutes I had it figured out. One funny thing is that most of them will hit harder if you hit the powerband, let off, then gag it. Mine will stand up almost every time if I do not lose traction first. As long as you do not putt around and if you do pull the clutch and rev it every now and then you will be just fine. If you do not have the space or surface to open it up on then dont open it up plain and simple. Im not sure why people dislike them or are afraid of them. Its a bike, a 50cc kids bike is sufficient enough to kill you and a 500cc 2 stroke can be riden safely by anybody. Its all about SELF-PRESERVATION. I can have fun without taking BIG risks. Gearing changes might and might not be necessarry depending on where and how you ride. If you plan on going slow, gear it to do so and vice versa. You cant go fast on a bike geared to go slow and you cant go slow worth a crap on a bike geared to go fast.