Should 50cc parents be allowed on the track to help with the kids??

wardy

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#1
A question that alot of you might be surprised at the answer, what s your thoughts?

wardy

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"the older i get, the shorter i want the moto!"
 
#2
Well, I think they should to a point, but they shouldn't be allowed to run beside them, because they might get in the way of other people. But I think they should be allowed to stand like in certian spots that way if there son/daughter wrecks, they can be there to help them out! I know most flagmen are there and help... but some kids want there parents!

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Hugebear

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#3
Isn't racing supposed to help teach the tykes independence and self-reliance?  (Not necessarily my position, just considering one side of what will undoubtedly be a debate).


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#4
Parents absolutely should be allowed on the track to help a son or daughter who has crashed. While many kids on 50s (especially PWs) can start their bikes, they can't do so without an adult to stabilize the machine, nor can many kids that small lift their bikes. Few would argue this point. But should it be a parent, not a flagman, volunteer, etc.? Yes. Here's why:

* The perception of favoritism. Trust me, as a parent stands by the fence watching a flagman lift and start his kid's bike, he'll probably notice half a dozen things the flagman could have done to speed up the process -- things the parent certainly saw the flagman do for the last kid who crashed!

* Speed. I doubt tracks can staff a flagman for every kid. If the parents are allowed to help, downed riders can be picked up and moved out of harm's way much sooner.

* Litigious tendencies. If parents help the kids, that's one less time a track employee is coming in contact with the child and one less time for the basis of a law suit to be established. It's a sad fact, but true.

* Many children have weak psyches. A friend's boy is emotionally devastated whenever he crashes and he usually cries, whether he's physically hurt or not. A track employee would not know how to deal with the situation, resulting in either the unnecessary end to the kid's race or the flagman investing too much time with a otherwise OK kid in a high-maintenance situation.

* Related to the above point, a parent knows the kid's reaction to injury better than a stranger. If a kid is hurt, the parent will know much sooner than the flagman if medical attention is necessary.

* It doesn't really matter if they're allowed or not, if a parent sees his pride and joy laid out in a turn with three or four mini bikes wobbling and raging toward his kid, that parent *will* be out on that track. Disqualify him, fine him, try to tackle him, whatever. You're not going to stop him.

* Where's the harm? If a parent is legitimately helping a child just restart the bike and get moving again, what is the reasoning for *not* allowing them to help? It clears the path sooner and ensures more fun for the kid who just crashed.

This is not to say a parent should be allowed on the track for any other reason (to push a tentative offspring up a jump, to offer overly exuberant encouragement that interferes with other riders, etc.), but in the name of safety, fairness and prudence, parents gotta be able to lend a hand to their kids.

James
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#5
I think that parents should be allowed in one certain spots on the track, but not allowed to run around the track after their kids.  It good for the kids to hear their parents cheering them on, but how are they going to learn about real competition if mom and dad are always there to pick them up.  Part of competing is learning independence.  Just my opinion
 

wardy

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#6
Now get this, AMA rules states that no one other than a track official  can help any rider up. THis includes the 50cc class. A couple of years ago a rider got dis qualified over this in the 50 sr class. The main reason i have asked for your thoughts on this is.......FOR the last 2 years at AMA congress I have asked  to have this rule ammended for the 50cc class. Certain members of this certain committee don't want to touch this, but get this.,.....at our last AMA -d-17 meeting i had a show of hands on how many tracks allow the parents to help.........100% raised there hands. SO this year i will ask for this change again, and with your input maybe i can come up with a better battle line.

thanks a bunch keep the ideas flowing

wardy


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"the older i get, the shorter i want the moto!"
 

oldguy

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#7
Wardy  being a regular flagger I definately agree on letting parents help a child that is down as long as they are aware of the other bikes on the track and dont interfere with them.  Problem with our track is that the parents can only see at best 10% and every once in a while we have to pull a chaser off the track.  The 50 jrs aren't to big a problem as they seldom get overly competitive but the srs are starting to get the urge and both they and the parents can use their physical presence to slow done other riders.  I would rather see flaggers stay in position to protect everyone on the track instead of chasing down crashes.  Definately keep a ban on under 18 yr olds from entering the track-
 

wardy

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#8
Oh absolutely there should only be one person per rider that could asist and this would only be under very strict restrictions. I have implemented this at my track and seems to work, the last thing we need is a parent helping his kid only to knock down another rider. I have seen that happen a bunch of times.

wardy

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"the older i get, the shorter i want the moto!"