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The "Good" Side of off roading

Joined
Jun 15, 2001
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#1
Went riding both days this weekend at Paragon and one day last weekend at Tower City. On the way into the riding areas I’m always pumped to see the increasing concentration of bike and yeah, quads, in tow on the backs of pick up trucks and trailers. You know your getting close to rip time! As I roll into Tower city, the local gas stations, dinners, Ice Cream shops, ect are packed full of trucks and trailers of bikes and ATV's.
Going for dinner Saturday night, roll into town off the Interstate and the lots of all the Hotels and Motels are PACKED with trucks with trailers, bikes, quads, Jeeps, you name it, if it goes off road its on a trailer in the lot! I could not believe both sides of the road, the lots are full of riders flooding into these otherwise hole in the woods maybe 1/4 full of truck drivers rest stops are full of off-roaders! We go into Perkins for some chow and the waiting area is full of some off rode (Jeep drivers) that I had seen earlier in the day. They don’t recognize me but are friendly and start talking with us, we get seated next to each other and have a great time talking and joking over dinner.
My point? If you have not guessed, the off road community is BIG and brings hordes of customers and consumers into otherwise desolate ghost towns long since forgotten by the coal industry, or any other feasible economic sustenance. A lifeblood for the nearby areas where legal organized riding parks are evolving from local word of mouth riding areas.
The build up of the North East Suburbs and turning of the screws on what’s left by DEP, state and local cops, has the displaced local riders formed into die hard customers that are thankful to drive 2, 3, 4, 6 hours from 4 states with their trucks and trailers to satisfy the need to ride!
The positive economic impact of the industry CANT be ignored by anyone who rolls down the Interstates and towns around these areas and sees hundreds of people and ATVs and all the $ they bring in. I really think this aspect of the sport should be stressed more in the creation, publicity and defense of the OHV community. Much like big bike rallies are publicized.
It just kind of made me think, maybe the loss of many small riding areas in bitter local, not in my backyard battles can evolve into a concentration and promotion of much larger albeit remotely located, riding areas where Off-roading, IS the definition of the local economy instead of the scurdge of the local residents. Maybe places like Tower City and Hazelton will be "known" by all for ATV riding the way Sturgis is known for the bike rally.
Hey, a boy can dream cant he!
 

70 marlin

Mi. Trail Riders
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Aug 15, 2000
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#2
Ditto! I allway's try to spread around as much $$$$ as I can when out for a ride!
 

CaptainObvious

Formally known as RV6Junkie
Damn Yankees
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Jan 8, 2000
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#3
Jason,

You are right. The people at the quick stop outside of Paragon are ALWAYS glad to see us walk through the doors, mud and all. I'm happy to drive 1 to 2 hours for a day of safe, hassle-free riding. I can't think of a better way to spend time with my kids and friends.

If you think about I-81 between I-78 and I-80 there are three great places to ride: Paragon, Tower City and Rouch Creek. Just minutes from there off I-80 is Jack Frost (Traxx). And there are more being built! I know of a trail system being built close to Easton. I hope to see more. Many of the business’ in the Pocono’s live and die on skiers and weekend get-a-wayers. I’m sure they are glad to see our trucks, trailers, jeeps and bikes.

But we have to do our job too. We have to respect the land we ride on or these new sights will disappear as well. If we are good to the merchants and land we will have great places to ride for a long time.
 
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Apr 11, 2000
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#4
You guys and your families are the future of the sport. There is a grass roots organization of clubs and individuals in the state working hard to make our sport grow, check 'em out at www.paohv.org.

By the way, just over a year ago, paohv helped conduct an economic impact study of OHV activity, (trail bike and ATV) activity in the state. The overall annual impact was a whopping $1.1 Billion annually statewide. The study also focused in on the regional impact of the Allegheny National Forest trails in NW PA, which permit both bikes and quads. That impact was $68 Million annually.

The press release for the study was sent to several newspapers and radio stations. Guess how many ran it. Guess how many of those same media outlets have been running anti-OHV stories full of BS rhetoric and distortions?

We can be our own worst enemy or our own best ally. It's up to us!

H
 

70 marlin

Mi. Trail Riders
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#5
Buy any chance is there a web sites that we can veiw these parks? are they trail systems or just motor scamble zone?
 

70 marlin

Mi. Trail Riders
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#7
Thanks for the links! looks like you have some fun places to play!
 

CaptainObvious

Formally known as RV6Junkie
Damn Yankees
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#8
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#9
Yeah man, the areas have been around for a while, you had to know about them and how to get there, get around and where not to go. Now with the loss of so much of the regions suburban riding area they are organizing and becoming ligitamate buissnesses now that the rider base is willing to drive hours to get to them instead of risking the fines, impound and harassment on whats left of what little local riding area we had in the first place. They dont even have to advertise, the word of mouth alone is enough to pack the parks. People see me working on or hauling my dirtbike, stop, pull over and ask me where I ride.
Heres some of my pics from this year. Lot of DRN guys in there.
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/jasnker/