1967 Triumph TR6C Rebuild by a noob.

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#16
Tinkered around on the TR6 today, had to replace the petcocks, yes there are two. Apparently Triumph is known for crappy "petrol taps". Overly large and complicated for the fail.

Working on bikes of that era really shows how far we've come. I mean the Bonneville (and TR6) in the 60's was super popular for it's power (that of a modern 250 four stroke), top end speed (120+) and good looks. But when you get down into it, you've got to wonder what the engineers of the day were thinking.

Something as simple as a petcock. One main, the other for reserve. This requires two separate fuel lines and two separate inlets on the carb. There is literally no clean way to run the lines without kinks unless you use way more hose than you should have to. They 1) Get in the way of the air filter and 2) they stick out and hang directly over the exhaust. Really? I know the thing was built 52 years ago, but...

And this, on a bike with just one carb. The Bonneville has two. _duh_

Yes, that was a long time ago.

steve-mcqueen-bud-ekins-triumph-desert-motorcycle-racing.jpg
Harvey Mushman
 

Ol'89r

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#18
HELLO!!! Anybody home? What a score Bob. You did good. Those are real keepers. I would not restore them either. There are so many restored mid-sixty's Triumphs out there it has lowered the value of the bikes. An un-restored original with the patina intact is more popular than a perfectly restored one. Wipe them down with an oily rag and touch up the bad stuff. Rich is right, (as usual) use 0000 steel wool and Semi-Chrome on the shiny stuff and Simple Green and a lot of elbow grease works good on the castings. The reason they use two petcocks is because of the way the gas tanks are designed. There is a frame tube that goes between the two sides of the tank leaving deep sections on either side. If you only had one petcock, you would still have gas in the other side of the tank when one side runs out. Hence the reserve petcock on one side. The copies of the original petcocks are cheap and very accessible. If properly routed the fuel lines should not kink on the Bonneville. I can get you all of the parts you need and have them drop-shipped to your home. Big D cycle in Dallas is another good source for parts and info. I would suggest buying a set of Whitworth wrenches and sockets to work on them. Triumph changed over to SAE around 1967 but everything before that was whitworth. In an effort to use up all of their old stock, some of the 68-70's still had some whitworth combined with SAE. Those are particularly fun to work on. LOL. Have fun with your new projects and call me if you need any help.
9er.
 
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#19
Thanks for the great info Terry! I'm def stocked-up on the 0000 and a few kinds of polish I've had laying around, I'll pick up a tube of Semi-Chrome and give that a try as well.

I should probably put another elbow or two on order as well, I've damn near worn-out the two I have in stock.

I would suggest buying a set of Whitworth wrenches and sockets to work on them.
I was fortunate that he also donated his "Triumph Toolbox" full of Whitworth / SAE tools, in addition to several specialty tools, and two Triumph tool kits that came with the bikes.

I'll be putting a parts list together over the coming weeks and will get that off to you, thanks for the help there!
 
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#20
Here's the T100C cleaned-up a little. This one is rough compared to the other two, but mostly all there, needs wiring harness, chain, cables, etc. I'm going to sell this one to help fund the other two.

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Ol'89r

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#21
Cool, it's good you got tools with the bikes. These things are not that hard to work on with the right tools. Heck, even Gomer could do it.
One important thing to consider with a barn find. Triumphs have a sludge tube in the crankshaft. This sludge tube is designed to capture all of the swarf in the oiling system. (Dirt, grit, metal shavings, etc.) The oil enters the crankshaft and goes into the sludge tube. By design and centrifugal force, the sludge tube captures the swarf in a semi-solid state and lets the clean oil go to the rod journals.
When a bike sits for 30 years or more, the sludge in the sludge tube will dry out and become solid. When you start and run a Triumph that has been sitting for that long, there is a chance the sludge will break up and go into the rod bearings. This will result in damaging the rod bearings and usually the rod journals.
You have two options... Take the engine completely apart and clean out the sludge tube. Measure everything, install new rod inserts and anything else that is not in spec. Then you will have a good solid engine that will last.
Option number two is to go ahead and run the engine and hope for the best. You may be able to get away with no problems but if the sludge gets into the rod inserts, it will damage the inserts and most likely damage the rod journals on the crankshaft. In which case you will still have to disassemble the engine. Rather than waiting until your rods start knocking and having to regrind the journals, or worse yet, throw a rod through your cases, I prefer option number one.
If you want to pick one and tear it down, I can walk you through it.
 
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#22
Thanks Terry, I was on the fence about pulling the engine(s), that info makes the decision pretty clear.

I’ve watched a couple of Lowbrow Customs tear down and rebuild videos; any thoughts on those if you’ve seen them?

Looks pretty straight forward, even for a mostly maintenance kinda guy. On the other hand, @Rich Rohrich has called me a ham-fisted gorilla on more than one occasion. :p
 
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#25
I miss the High Lord Gomer ... guess he's off fishing most of the time these days. Even so, I bet he still finds a way to get hurt, lol.
 
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#26
Terry,
You mentioned special tools earlier. I've seen some of the stuff company's make, wondering what I can get by with... I don't intend to rebuild triumph engines for a living :) . Here's what I found (other than hand tools) in the Triumph toolbox mentioned earlier; obviously some pullers, no idea if they are specific to the job or...? No idea what some of the other items are. I'm guessing you can ID these and let me know what else I'll need?

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Ol'89r

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#27
HLG is into Kayaking. He found it is a lot softer hitting water than it is hitting dirt.
The only puller I recognize is the clutch hub puller in the lower center of the pic. A good site for info is www.britishonly.com/technicallibrary. You can download parts books and instruction books from this site. A good parts source is www.jrcengineering.com These are the guys I get most of my parts from.
Lowbrow vids are pretty good. I haven't seen all of them but what I have seen are good. I can help you with the special tools you may need when you get to that point.
Disassemble the bottom end first. Primary, clutch etc. Any standard gear puller will pull the engine sprocket off. Then disassemle the timing side. It is easier to do it this way because you will have resistance while removing the nuts and you won't have the loose rods flopping around. Then remove the top end.
You may not have to remove the cam gears and cams depending upon the wear in the cam bushings. If the cam bushings feel tight, you can leave the cams and the gears in the right side case.
You will have to remove the crankshaft pinion gear and that takes a special puller. One of the pullers on the top right side of the pic may work for that if they fit behind the gear. The cam gears take a special puller and by using a standard gear puller you can damage the bushings. Next time I talk with Gomer I will tell him the guys on DRN are jones'n for a good laugh.
 
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#28
Sweet ... hoping for good cam bushings. On the other hand, I may replace all the bushings and bearings anyway... unless it's obvious they are recent.

Part of the mystery is that in the boxes of parts I went through last night, were (used) pistons, rings & rods. Nothing to indicate if they were even in any of these bikes, or possibly from the '67 TT he sold years ago. Since the TR6 was his favorite and one he was going to sell, maybe I'll get lucky and that motor was rebuilt recently. I sure wish his memory was better.

Anyway... thanks again for the great info. I wouldn't have thought that I could get away with leaving the cams / gears alone.

BTW: I guess I'll transition this thread into a rebuild "story" from a noob's (never split a case) perspective. Someone might find it useful?
 
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#29
Too late to turn back now...

So I tossed my hat on the bench and thought, yeah, that works.
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No way to get that motor out without removing the rocker boxes. Removing everything else I can to reduce weight... If I recall correctly, the 650 motor weighs 130+ lbs ( I'll be lifting it out and to the bench solo)

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Ol'89r

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#30
Too late to turn back now...

So I tossed my hat on the bench and thought, yeah, that works.
View attachment 20777



Now way to get that motor out without removing the rocker boxes. Removing everything else I can to reduce weight... If I recall correctly, the 650 motor weighs 130+ lbs ( I'll be lifting it out and to the bench solo)

View attachment 20778
You can remove the engine by removing the four long rocker box bolts but it is much easier if you remove the rocker boxes completely. Also, remove the primary cover. Engine will be less bulky and easier to hold on to. Remove the engine from the left side.
 
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