Changing Fork Bushes

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May 17, 2001
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#1
I have my forks apart to change the seals. The first time the forks had been apart by the condition of the oil.

Should I also be changing the bushes? How do I know if the bushes are shot?

Is there anything else I should be doing while the forks are apart?

I'm replacing the springs for .39 Eibach's at the same time and putting in 5wt oil.

The bikes a '98 kdx220 with not too many miles on it and I ride mostly sandy woods.

Thanks for your help.
 
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#2
What kind of bushes are they, azaelias?:confused: :p

I guess you mean the bushings. If the bike has low hours, I'm sure the bushings are fine, just change the oil. My bike is 9 years old, and the bushings have only needed replacing once.
 

dhoward

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#4
Originally posted by JohninKY

Actually, an azalea is a shrub.:silly:
Correct John, in fact if I may.....

Azalea are shrubs of the genus Rhododendron and members of the heath family. There are 8 divisions of the genus Rhododendron. Azalea comprise two of those divisions. Azalea are distinguished by large clusters of pink, red, orange, yellow, purple, or white flowers. Typically non-azalea rhododendrons have flowers that are in trusses. The truss is composed of many flowers. Typically an azalea has flowers that have just one flower rather than a truss. The notable exception are the azaleas that have a very tight ball shaped truss.

When Linnaeus created the botanical grouping called genus Rhododendron in 1753, he created a separate genus for Azalea containing 6 species. In 1796 Salisbury pointed out that Azalea and Rhododendron could not be maintained as distinct genera. In 1834, George Don subdivided the genus Rhododendron into 8 sections which are still recognized today. Azalea comprise two of these sections, Subgenus Pentanthera typified by Rhododendron nudiflorum and Subgenus Tsutsusi typified by Rhododendron Tsutsusi.

If flowers grow from terminal buds, new leaves and shoots grow from lateral buds and leaves are deciduous, then the rhododendron is an azalea in the Pentanthera subgenus.

If flowers and leaves grow from the same terminal buds, and the flowers have 5 to 10 stamens, then the rhododendron is an azalea in the Tsutsusi subgenus.....

Uh, sorry....
Listen to Spanky!!
:eek:
 
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#5
dhoward,

I had to check your profile after that post! I was 100% expecting to see your occupation as 'Professional Nerd' :cool:
PLEASE tell me you copied and pasted that from somewhere other than your head... haha just kidding

Dave
 

dhoward

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#6
Whew. Thanks Can.
I had been carrying that around with me all day. Then Yarbonwick's Bear and rabbit joke pushed it out of my head into here.
Sometimes my head leaks....
:)
 
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#7
Thanks for the help guys, I've planted my azalias, which I thought could have been a rhododendron, thanks for clearing that up for me:p

So I have forgone bushings and are now using azalias in my forks to great affect. They are very plush indeed. I was wondering however about the longevitiy of the bushes you have mentioned:confused:

Then again I might just read the posts on the suspension forum...;)
 
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#8
Originally posted by Simon Fuller
I was wondering however about the longevitiy of the bushes you have mentioned:confused:
While I stand in awe of Dhoward's knowledge of shrubbery, I feel obligated to add that for longevity the Delaware valley azalea's are the best especially for northern climates. Also consider adding cheleated iron particularly for the alkaline soils of the midwest.