Fairly new to the whole thing

Wolf

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#1
I am fairly new to this trials thing, I've dabbled in it occasionally, but really never got strated.
I now have a 97 Fantic Section parked in my garage, so now its time to play:)
Anything I should know about this particular bike? I know parts are going to be a little challenging to come by. Any advice would be appreciated.
Any advice for a beginner?
 

Patman

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#2
Ryan Young's tape/DVD is pretty good.

Slow figure 8's using peg weighting while keeping your shoulder centered over the bike is good practice.

If you find yourself dabbing to one side or the other there is a fair chance your dropping that shoulder.
 

Wolf

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#3
I've been riding 8's all weekend, trying to do it "full lock". I'm doing ok with it, most of the time, I will keep this in mind tonight and see if I can't cure those occasional dabs. Trying to figure out how to "side step" the front tire without moving forward. That has actually put me on the ground several times:)
 

Patman

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#4
Check with your local club and see if they enforce the "no stop" rule or not.
 

Wolf

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#5
"No Stop" rule meaning you actually can't "side step" without moving forward?
What about "hopping" the back tire (not that I have conquered that one yet anyways!)
I will make some phone calls tonight...
 

Patman

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#6
No stop being that all forward movement has come to an end. I figured that maybe you wanted to stop and then side step the front for a better angle. I've seen it done as both a stop and hop or as a fluid movement (very nice). I usually end up on my head if I try the one fluid movement thing :confused:
 

JTT

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#10
Hey Wolf, instead of trying those figure 8s at full lock, try making them by leaning the bike (using peg pressure). I got caught in the full lock mode early on, only to find out that while it is fun on a smooth driveway, it is less than desirable on loose surfaces or rocks. By leaning the bike the bars do not have to turn so far to lock, and therefore stand a greater chance of rolling over an obstacle, such as a loose rock, rather than pushing it.

When it comes to hops here's a couple of little tips from a mediocre rider at best and with minimal experience ;)

Lifting the rear wheel is a matter or compressing the rear suspension and using the rebound, with front brake and a "push" on the bars. The tendancy is to push down on the bars, but you'll find that pushing forward will use considerable less energy. Practice on a downhill with lots of traction at first and get used to the sensation of the rear lifting.

As for front hops, it's all in the legs. Use your legs and arms to preload the forks, in a kind of 45 degree motion from hips to fron axle. You will then snap you legs straight in the opposite motion, using your arms like rigid cables. There is actually little arm "pulling" when done correctly. If you watch top riders on videos, you will see they use very little arm motion, it's all legs. The motion will be exagerated at first, but as your timing and feel comes around, the movements will become less and less and use much less energy.

This said, keep in mind, I SUCK :confused: I could not front hop until this year, and now find it easier than lifting the rear. Mind you, what can be done in the driveway is different than what can be done in an actual section :thumb:
 
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#11
The Ryan Young video is the best spend the money and watch it many times keep it around for refernce. If possible ride with a upper level rider and watch what he/she does and try to mimick the motion or line that they take, sometimes that combined with instruction on a line or technique helps me start good rideing habits instead of learning the wrong (or less desireable) way and then haveing to change.

just my nickles worth...

Good Luck!
 

Wolf

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#12
Thanks for all the good tips and links. The way this is going, and as much fun as I'm having, I might have to consider parking the KDX for a while and strictly ride trials....
 

wayneg

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#13
Another thing to do with your figure 8's is to try it on a slope. Then again on an uneven slope, and then for fun throw in a couple of bricks, small rocks or small logs to break it up. Creek beds can also be good practice and as JTT says will challenge your turning technique with a rocky suface.

For the lower classes (where I'm at!) its more about turning and small obstacles than about hopping or splattering. Practice the double blip on logs up to about 4' in diameter, and on rocks and banks that are not undercut.

In my opinion you should be aiming at getting your turning and balance before worrying about hopping or any of the advanced stuff just yet. Depending on who is setting out the trials they should be able to challenge your skills without making the turns so tight that you have to hop all over the place to get around.

One of the guys in my club has got a '95 Fantic Section, and it goes pretty well. His bike seems to be very reliable and he hasn't really had too many problems with it. There are still parts available through someone in the UK if you are having problems, I'll try and find out a contact for you.
 

JTT

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#14
Wayne makes a good point, as does Junkman. Focus on the basics and you cannot go wrong. Developing bad habits and techniques trying to do stuff too advanced will only hold you back later....but darn, it's fun! ;)
 

Patman

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#15
Wolf if you ever get the chance attend some instruction at TTC in TN with Raymond Peters instructing. Ray has got to be one of the best trials teachers out there. VERY patient (hey he worked with ME!) and very good at helping analyze what your doing right and wrong and helping you fix it. I also was very fortunate to get to spend some time with Gary Jackson who was Ray's minder for a while, superior person in general and a great teacher :whiner: TexKDX has helped me tons ans it's no wonder as he spent large amounts of time with Gary. Do yourself a favor and try to hook up with some local riders of various levels. I've found them to generally be very accomidating and willing to teach as well.