How to break in a KDX220R

Joined
Sep 25, 2001
Messages
8
Likes
0
#1
I might be the owner of a brand new 2001 KDX220 this weekend.

What is the procedure for breaking in the engine? I have only ridden a dirt bike once before so I will only have a beginner's skillset to work with while trying to break in the bike.

Thanks in advance for your advice,
Ken
 
Joined
Jun 4, 2001
Messages
211
Likes
0
#2
If you don't get an answer from the real experts here, read your owner's manual. Kawasaki ain't stupid, though your dealer might be!:p
 

Perk

Subscriber
Joined
Sep 17, 2001
Messages
303
Likes
0
#3
What I was told by my dealer, who I do trust knows their stuff, was to give it a 50 mile break in period. In other words, just poke around a bit and keep away from the higher RPM's. Worked like a charm for mine. Some others here may have different opinions though. I'm no ace when it comes to the mechanical part. :cool:
 

Fred T

Mi. Trail Riders
Joined
Mar 23, 2001
Messages
5,272
Likes
2
#4
Heat and cool cycles are best...

to get the piston and rings properly seated and get the piston to form. I suggest you start the bike up and let it run gently rapping the throttle to keep it from fouling a plug. Get it nice and warm for like 15 minutes and you don't need to ride it. Then let it cool completly, and I mean completly like for hours. Then do that again. Next take it for a spin for 20-30 minutes running gently through the gears but getting some load on the engine and going through all the gears several times. Then let it cool again. You can now drain the tranny oil and replace it. Take her for a trail ride and don't run it high in the rpm range for extended periods that first ride and you're good to go go after that. I personally change the tranny oil after ever 2 rides so after your next ride change it again. I might also suggest you visit Canadian Daves JustKDX site for jetting help. The KDX comes jetted rich. Oh, and another thing....tear the uni track apart and grease it along with the front steering stem bearings. The Japs don't grease them nearly enough from the factory.
 
Last edited:

dhoward

Lifetime Sponsor
Joined
Feb 7, 2000
Messages
455
Likes
2
#6
Fred pretty much said it all. The heat cycles are most important, but don't forget to hit the suspenders with some good quality waterproof grease. Go over all of the fasteners with a drop of Loctite. Remove the brake pad retaining pins and apply a little anti-sieze.
Have fun!
:)
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2001
Messages
26
Likes
0
#7
All the above advice is good and from an engineering standpoint correct. In reality however, how can you Not go out and ride you brand new bike.

Sounds like you are a novice rider so go out and have fun. Avoid any over reving (the 220 likes to upshift anyway) and dont crash and let the throttle stick wide open, but DO have fun.

You cant kill a KDX anyway. Ive mistreated them for twenty years and they have never failed me.
 

Canadian Dave

Super Power AssClown
Joined
Apr 28, 1999
Messages
1,202
Likes
0
#8
Welcome to the JustKDX forum Ken,

You'll want to check out the new bike prep. section on the JustKDX home page. Follow the link below, click on tech tips then New Bike Prep.

David
 

Fred T

Mi. Trail Riders
Joined
Mar 23, 2001
Messages
5,272
Likes
2
#9
NO, not a new motor.

Originally posted by 125 rider
Fred, isn't that bad for a bike- letting it idle for 15 minutes?
What I said was to keep the bike running with gentle throttle raps to keep it cleaned out but not over revving and allow it to run long enough to get hot and then shut it off. That is exactly how I broke my bike in and I've ridden it 1000 miles so far this year and it still runs strong. The heat-cool-heat-cool cycle works great.