Putting it all together

Joined
May 20, 2001
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#1
Hi,

I have the problem that there just isn't enough time for me to train and recuperate as fast as I want. I ride 2-4 times a week and then do cardio 1-3 times (depending on how much I ride). I haven't done weight training for a few months now, since I think riding and cardio are much more important for me now (check stats below).

The problem is, I would like to do more, especially because I don't get much of a physical workout from riding anymore, I ride about 30-45 minutes of actual riding each time I ride. This little since I go riding with my father and he doesn't want to hang out at the track for the whole day (and I don't like the thought of riding alone). I'm thinking about starting to train with some other riders, but then there is the psychological aspect of still wanting to ride with my father.

Last winter I think I trained too much and got bronchitis, which wasn't nice and put me out of riding for weeks. This is why I have been taking it a bit easier and never training for more than two days in a row. I'm now thinking about squeezing more into those days, for example MX'ing and weight training on the same day.

I'm 26 years old, 191 cm (6'4"), 205 lbs. and can do about 2500 meters in the Cooper test (running for twelve minutes), bench about 240 and squat or deadlift 375 lbs.(max). When I do my cardio, I run 5100m. in 32 minutes at 140-155 bpm (some insane hills on my route). For some reason I have a suspiciously low resting heart rate of 43 bpm, but can only push myself to about 180 bpm max.

I only started seriously riding about 2,5 years ago, and my speed is still seriously lacking I lose about two laps in a 20min+2 laps race to World Championship level riders (about 20 seconds per 2 minute lap).

I've decided to concentrate on getting my cardio fitness and riding skills up and weight down, and pretty much ignore strength training because I've never felt too weak to move the bike around until I'm very tired.

Somebody want to share how you piece together your training?
 
Joined
Nov 29, 2000
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#2
If you are feeling overtrained check your diet and resting patterns(try to get 7-8 hours of sleep per night. If your diet is lacking you will feel run down. If you are serious consult with a dietitian and they will set you up with the proper diet for your needs. I would not give up on the weights completely; the lean muscle that they help provide is an asset in any activity.
 

zio

Mr. Atlas
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
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#3
You also may want to look into "Body For Life", a program that a few DRN'ers can vouch for (Rich, I think?, don't remember). I ordered the book, and am gearing up to give it a shot. Looks like the best fintess program I've seen so far.
 
Joined
May 16, 2001
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#4
I believe that there is no better substitute for training for an activity than that specific activity. Therefore, the bulk of your training should be spent in the saddle and a basic level of fittness is assumed. Duplicating race intensity when you ride is also essential. As with most modern programs a hard day/light day approach is not a bad way to go, with particular focus spent on weak points or race type (ex. enduro vs. mx). Gym work-outs should focus on similar demands of riding: cardio, muscular endurance, and muscular strength (legs before arms) in that order of importance. For cardio, I would recommend an elliptical trainer, body walk machine, stationary or mountain biking. They better duplicate the lower extremity demands of riding. Running, my personal favorite is fine but tends to weaken legs at low intensity (jogging). If you like to run try to work your way up to intervals or hill work- outs once a week. I also make a hagit of some leg work in the gym. Cardio work-outs should be built up to > 45mins at least 3X/ week with one of the work-outs at high intensity. Sounds like you are fit (RHR=43) but lack some intensity in your cardio. A good weight routine for mx'ers uses 3X/week higher rep. (10-15) lower weight with little to no rest between sets. Work opposite muscle groups each set doing 3 sets per body part. Don't forget the abs. It will be hard at first, but can be done < 1 hour for entire upper-body especially with machines. Avoid use of wrist straps and weight belts with concentration on good technique. A good personal trainer should be able to set you up. I am certainly far from an expert level rider, but I have placed well in many events beating superior technical riders with conditioning. It allows you to finish strong as others are fading. I have very little accessible riding area so I spend more time training off the bike, Maryland has limited riding.

Your results will not lie.
If you are dropping more points (enduro) or positions (mx) in the second half of a race it is likely because of relative conditioning to other riders ( need more time in gym, especially cardio). If you are staying consistent (midpack or better) through-out race you probably need more saddle time. Of course everybody is different and there exsist no single formula. I also agree with cleaning up your diet ( a whole other topic). Watch out for over-training and try to taper for race day. If you race every weekend you would obviously need to modify. For example: no high intensity work-outs after Thursday (riding or the gym) and at least one day of complete rest (work not included). Hope this helps.
Good Luck!
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2001
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#5
Some of the privateers are lapped 2 times in a race by Ricky Carmicheal, the privateers dont have physical trainers or factory works parts, which make the factory bikes a lot faster, smooth, and light. I dont know how the money is in Motocross in Finland, but i think it would be wise for you to look for sponsors willing to pay for you to have a physical trainer help you 2 hours a day 4 days a week or so. Also, getting a sponsor with more experience in suspension or motor setup may be a good idea. Maybe, seeking factory support or racing for a satellite team would put you on a better bike. Those 20 seconds per lap can be gained, the question is, where is it lost. I believe the factory bikes shave 6-8 seconds a lap over a privateers bike and tire the rider less. Physical training from a professional may make your body more attuned to the specific rigors of MX.
Good Luck
 
Joined
May 20, 2001
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#6
Ok, the 20 seconds per lap may have been flattering me. The rider was a factory supported 125 rider but not one of those that can sometimes get lapped by the front runners. The race was a club race where he had zero competition and was probably just cruising having fun(albeit on his home track).

I am serious about racing, but my results certainly won't attract any sponsors as of yet(and as you can read, at some point my sheer size will put an end to my progress). I do work full time in IT and can pay my way through most any kind of physical training and pretty much all the tuning parts I feel I need. So far I've concentrated on getting my modified suspension and stock engine dialed in, and I don't feel as if the bike is ever on the limit.

Thanks for the replies to everybody.
 
Joined
Mar 27, 2001
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#7
Originally posted by Anssi
I go riding with my father and he doesn't want to hang out at the track for the whole day (and I don't like the thought of riding alone). I'm thinking about starting to train with some other riders, but then there is the psychological aspect of still wanting to ride with my father.
You are so lucky to have your father to go riding with. Seize the moment because one day you will no longer have your father to ride with. My father is the one who got me & my husband into riding & now he is in such bad health that he can't even go riding with us. :(