CRGuy

Posts Too Much
Member
Nov 14, 2000
234
0
The rebound could be too soft/fast and your spring rate could be too stiff. It's most likely going to be both. I lean all the way back and let the front tire skip over the top's.
CRG
 

KawieKX125

~SPONSOR~
Oct 9, 2000
948
0
Gripo the bike with your knees as hard as you can and lean back while pinning it. There is not much skill to whoops according to Gary Semics, just need alot of guts. He proved this to me when I (novice) went just as fast as him (pro)through the whoops.
Also, maybe you may want to increase the sag a little and make the rear end a little softer on the comp clicker.
 

HiG4s

~SPONSOR~
Mar 7, 2001
1,308
0
from the MX-tech web site

Setting the rebound:

1.) Find a relatively fast trail with braking bumps, rocks and roots leading into the entrance of a corner. Reduce (Turn clicker out) the rebound damping until the rear end begins to hop or feel loose. Finally, increase (Turn clicker in) the rebound damping until the sensation goes away.

2.) Find a log or ledge that tends to bounce the motorcycle after hitting it. If the rear end bounces up uncontrollably, add rebound. (Turn clicker in)

3.) Find some large whoops. The motorcycle should track straight through the whoops with the rear wheel extending to the ground before the next impact. If it does not perform as described, as above, it is packing and the rebound dampening should be reduced! (Turn clicker out) (Please note the guide for sand set-up, as these rules don't apply for sand.)

4.) Find a corner with acceleration bumps, rocks, and roots on the exit. The rear of the motorcycle should follow the ground. If the rear end "breaks up", reduce the rebound. (Turn clicker out) (If this fails soften the compression two clicks.) (Turn clicker out)

There is lots more there, check it out.
 

High Lord Gomer

Poked with Sticks
Sep 26, 1999
11,790
34
Originally posted by Saratoga
Drag the rear brake. This helps me the most to keep the bike tracking straight.
How do you do that? I'm bouncing around so much in whoops that I would be locking up the rear brake. The only time I can drag the brake is on fairly smooth ground.
 
S

Saratoga

I am realizing that having to think about the mechanics of riding is harder then just saying it. Dragging the rear brake keeps the rear wheel from kicking up over bumps or obstacles. It prevents the shock from unloading and keeps the rear wheel planted down.

As far as how I am able to do it, I just apply rear brake. It doesnt require a sensitive touch since the gas is on hard and the bike is moving forward with good momentum. It is hard to apply too much brake if the gas is on hard in the meat of the powerband.

The whoops I am referring to are mild compared to Arenacross or Supercross type whoops. I suppose the size of the bumps will determine if this technique is practical or not. Try it and let me know.
 

Okiewan

Admin
Dec 31, 1969
29,531
2,215
Texas
How do you do that?
I hear ya, worked on that over the last two weeks at the OTN, tough deal, no doubt. I think that when my feet were actually on the pegs I was braking, but don't quote me. :scream:
 

High Lord Gomer

Poked with Sticks
Sep 26, 1999
11,790
34
Originally posted by Saratoga
Try it and let me know.
I'll have to trust you on that one. I ride whoops on the balls of my feet. If my foot was in a position to hit the brake pedal, it wouldn't be there for long..I'd get bounced off. :eek:
 

monkeybutt

Member
Jun 12, 2001
54
0
I would caution against the whole rear brake thing.If you are going at any kind of speed the bike is rocking or skipping across the whoops so fast, a little too much brake and the front will drop into the whoops slowing or causing you to fly foward and possibly landing right on your head with the bike right behind you.
 

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