starting trouble

Wolf

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#1
2000 KDX 200. PC pipe. Uni Filter. No Lid.
45 pilot, 155 main, stock needle 2nd from top. Wisconsin (600 to 1000')
The problem:
Cold start...next to impossible. choke on, 3 blips with throttle, 1 kick and the bike fires, but dies immediately there after. repeat many times (too many to count) until it keeps running. Once it decides to run the choke can be turnd off immediately.

This is a symptom I have experienced for a while, and been playing with. I like the 45 pilot, it runs great when warmed up, but I am getting a little tired of kicking:) By the time the enduro starts I need a fifth of gatorade;)
Any advice?
 

G. Gearloose

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#2
Originally posted by Wolf
3 blips with throttle
Um, what is the purpose of this step? I suspect it is ineffective.

Other things that come to mind are;
-Decrease the idle screw just for S & G's to cause more vacuum, less air, more fuel. See what it does.
-Check the reads for warping.

You are keeping the throttle closed, right?
 

Wolf

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#3
Yes, throttle is closed.
The throttle blips make no sense to me either, but if I don't do it, I get "zero" fire. I would've never thought of it, but a guy I rode with mentioned it a while back. I laughed it off, but it was no laughing matter...
Will check reads, I figured I'd replace anyways.
 

KDXFreestyle

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#5
hmm... I heard the same thing about starting a bike... dont give it gas when u kick it... funny thing is, when you dont, everyone, including me, will NEVER get their bike started. It takes like a million kicks, vs, when u give it gas when u kick it, it takes like 1-3 ...........weird.........
 

Canadian Dave

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#6
At start up the engine internals are cold so the incoming charge of fuel condenses on the crank, case walls etc and doesn't vaporize like it does in the warm engine. The choke dumps enough fuel into the engine so ensure that some fuel vapor is transferred above the piston so it can fire. It sounds like for some reason this isn’t happening with your bike.

Here’s what I’d do in your case. 1) change your spark plug so ensure its not slightly fouled 2) blip the throttle each time you kick the bike over, mine wont start if I leave the throttle closed and 3) tip the bike over on its side prior to kinking and watch for fuel coming from the overflow. Once you see it stand the bike back up and give it a kick. If none of these thing work let us know and we’ll look at the problem in more detail.

David
 
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#7
'Once it decides to run the choke can be turnd off immediately'

Maybe it never works in the first place (plunger problem, circuit plugged up).

It's an enrichment circuit..not a butterfly (read..not really a choke at all). Maybe your 'enrichment' circuit is the pool of fuel you end up with after you kick yourself silly for awhile?

Where's your air screw? Wherever it IS, turn it in 1/2 turn or so before you try to start it. (change it back after start)
 

BRush

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#8
Just to expand on what CC said - it's getting colder, so sometimes a pilot circuit that was fine in warmer weather will make a bike hard to start. My KDX does this every fall. Assuming you know it's not a fouled plug or dirty carb problem, you might try a variation on my starting drill:

1) Turn air screw all the way in, back out 1/2 to 1 full turn, depending on how cold.

2) Lean bike over until gas dribbles out drain tube.

3) Put choke on, start bike.

3) Let bike warm up, turn off choke.

4) Return air screw to normal position (in my case, 1.5 turns out).

5) Go riding.
 

wanaride

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#9
My jetting must still be too rich...on a cold start with choke on my bike will start by the third kick with the throttle closed. I have NEVER had to open the throttle to get my bike to start.

I'm beginning to get a little worried about my bike. First I learn that the jetting out of the box isn't close to correct and must be adjusted, and now I hear that other KDX riders must tip their bike over to one side before starting it. Wow, I didn't know there was a 'speshul' starting procedure. :think:

This isn't inspiring any confidence...
 
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#10
I just turn on the petcock and give it a gentle kick(no choke). Starts on the first kick almost every time? You might try gently depressing the kick starter until you get it to catch at the very top, so you can get a good turn on it.
 
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#11
One other thing that may help is learning what works and repeating it. I know it sounds simple and you actually may be having a real issue with mixture etc...but I can't tell you how many times I've watched friends kick their bike 30, 40 even 50 plus times and then I hop on and start it with one or two kicks. Treat your bike like a woman and give it what it wants. My old Suzuki 185 always started on the second or third kick---two kicks with the choke and if not started, turn off the choke and fire right up. I think it would be worth giving it 2-3 kick with choke and then shut the choke off. I'm pretty sure you're having some other issue, but I thought this talk about starting a bike would be worth a few personal notes.
 

Wolf

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#12
Thanks guys,
CD, the plug is new, leaning the bike over is the first thing I do before I even attempt to start it, I failed to mention that earlier.

CC, no plugged up circuits, I disassembled, cleaned and reassembled. I will try the airscrew adjustments as advised. It really seems like its starving of fuel.
Just for kicks I put in the 48 pilot last night...much better, but I don't like the way it runs once warmed up. In with the 45 and buy more gatorade:)
Thanks again
Wolf
 

CaptainObvious

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#13
Worn or frozen rings? The extra fuel in the cylinder helps to create a seal that the rings can't do alone.

I'd suggest a compression test.
 

CaptainObvious

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#15
No, because the rings and cylinder expand when they are warmer creating a better seal.