Turning

yzeater

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May 21, 2001
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#1
I can't turn. I'm not talking about turning on a berm. I need to do a fast turn in a wide open area. What I do now is: slow down, pull in clutch, give little bit of power and kinda walk the bike around. I want to be able to do a fast turn where the back end whips around. Do I use the rear brake? Full on power? Any ideas? Thanks
 

KiDX

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Mar 30, 2001
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#2
Don't coast through the turn. Either be on the brakes or on the gas
 
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Jan 4, 2001
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#3
Get way up on the tank, head down, elbows up and don't let off the thottle. The rear end will come around natural if you take my position advice.
 
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#4
yzeater. If it is a flat type turn, start your slide with the rear brake. Come into the turn fast, backshift and apply a little rear brake to get the back end to kick out.

When the back end kicks out, apply throttle (BEFORE) letting off the brake. Look around the turn to where you want to go. (This is very important.)

You will have to be fairly aggressive on the throttle to keep the rear tire spinning and keep the bike sliding. This is the tricky part. Too much throttle and the bike will slide out. Not enough throttle and the rear tire will hook up and try to pitch you over the high side. YOU HAVE TO FIND THE BALANCE POINT.

Practice this at low speeds until you get comfortable with finding your balance point. Chances are, you will go down a few times learning your balance point, so, do it a low speed at first and wear ALL your gear.

Like Benjamin said, get way up front on the bike. Attack position.

Good luck.
 
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Apr 20, 2001
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#5
yzeater, I'm assuming you mean squaring off a corner?
If this is the case, I jab my rear brake before the apex of the turn, then simultaneously climb on my tank with the inside leg forward (for weight transfer or to catch you) while accelerating thru the turn. You want to loose some rear traction and slide it out. It takes practice.
 
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Jan 10, 2001
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#6
also make sure you weight the outside peg...this is a must for keeping traction to the rear wheel
 
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Jan 5, 2001
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#7
This is what i consider my best skill, sweepers. You want to sit on the bike slightly forward with your buttcrack on the outside corner of the seat. Then tilt the bike down by pushing it sideways with your arms. Keep your inside foot planted firm on the inside peg with a lot of your weight on the peg and not on the seat. If your coming out of a tight turn or at low speeds into this sweeper then keep your outside leg pointed at your front axle straight out. Your back tire might skip around, dont worry about it, ive never fallen on a non-rutted sweeper. If the sweeper is rutted, then you should lean the bike down further and start leaning into it earlier then you would think. Start to lean it down 10 feet before you reach the rut and youll sink right in.
 
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Jan 10, 2001
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#8
fmx_novice...i think you have your insides and outsides confused, better stay off the turns and stick with the big jumps :D also if you feel the back end start to slide out, dont let off the throttle, just slip the clutch a little.
 

SndyRds

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Feb 1, 2001
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#9
All the above is good advice, DRIVE the outside peg into the ground.I pride myself on being good at cornering (or so my friends say) Remember to change direction, you must stop going in the direction your going, like a piston. A piston going at high RPM comes to a complete stop at the top and bottom of every stroke. Work on exicuting (sp) the corner and then building the speed. One of my tricks is to brake extremely hard, and cornering smoothly, then accelerating like crazy. hope this helps a little bit, good luck and let us know how you progress.
Set up two cones or cans two or three gears apart on flat smooth ground and charge at them go around and do it again, repeat.
Practice, Practice, Practice.