weight the outside peg?

stormer94

Subscriber
Joined
May 30, 2001
Messages
597
Likes
0
#1
I keep seeing guys mention 'Weighting the outside peg". What exactly does this get you, and why would you do it. In theory, all I can see it doing is adding weight to the front of the bike, because the peg is likely further forward than your butt would be. What's the reasoning, when do you do it?

Thanks,
Bob
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2000
Messages
225
Likes
0
#2
I think what they mean by that is when you're coming through a corner
you have an inside peg and an outside peg. The inside peg being the peg
on the left in a left turn and so on. If you weight the outside peg on a corner I think
theres less chance of falling over or washing out. I could be wrong though...
 

dirt bike dave

Sponsoring Member
Joined
May 3, 2000
Messages
5,349
Likes
3
#3
This is how I see it:
The more weight you put on the pegs, the lower your center of gravity is, which will help cornering. Think about it; if you are standing, all your weight is on the pegs, so as far as the tires are concerned your center of gravity is lower when standing than when sitting with all your weight on the seat.

You often can't stand or weight both pegs when cornering because you might have your inner leg off the peg or very little weight on the inner leg. The more you weight the outer peg when sitting, the less weight you have on the seat, lowering the center of gravity.
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2001
Messages
10
Likes
0
#4
The reason for weighting the outside peg is so you get better traction in turns.... the simple truth. It presses the tires into the ground more, helping prevent washouts.
 

yzguy15

Sprayin tha game
N. Texas SP
Joined
Oct 27, 2000
Messages
1,271
Likes
0
#5
Yea, better traction. That's what the Gary Semics book says. Theoretically, if you're leaning the bike underneath you, keeping your body perpendicular to the ground, you have the potential for a wash out and weighting the outside peg gives you more traction and less chance to wash out. If you'll watch most of the pros in pictures and such, this is the way they turn.
 

stormer94

Subscriber
Joined
May 30, 2001
Messages
597
Likes
0
#6
Is it the rule, or the exception, to weight the peg. Should I be practicing that way, always trying and weight the outside peg? Or is it a 'feel' thing, and to be done when you need it.

The rest of the time, it's your butt putting the weight down?

Thanks for the input,
Bob
 

RM_guy

Scared of DirtWeek<BR>Club *********
Damn Yankees
Joined
Nov 21, 2000
Messages
6,674
Likes
38
#7
Here’s my theory

I agree with DirtBikeDave, it’s a center of gravity issue. Anytime that you weight the pegs, whether when you’re turning or standing up, you effectively change the CG for the bike/rider. When you weight one peg or the other you are shifting the CG to the side of the bike that you are weighting.

When the bike is straight up and down, the CG is centered over the tires and the bike remains upright. When the bike is leaning in a turn (with no foot peg weighting) the CG moves off center and tends to make the bike lean further.

Try putting your bike on a stand. It stays there by it’s self with out tipping over because the CG is directly over the center of the bike. Now push the bike to the side and it starts to fall over. This is because the CG is now shifted to the side and starts to pull the bike over. If you are on the bike when it begins to tip, you would instinctively move you body to the opposite side (moving the CG in the other direction) to balance the bike and keep it from falling over.

The same thing happens when you lean into a turn except centrifugal force is acting on the CG to pull it back up. The combination of gravity pulling the CG down and centrifugal force pulling the CG to the outside of the turn, keeps the bike from falling over and it maximizes the downward force on the tire to maximize traction. So the right combination of speed (to control centrifugal force) and lean will get you around the turn without falling or sliding out.

Now we move into real life. In reality is very difficult to get your speed and lean optimized since the conditions in a turn are so variable. Friction through out the turn can change from loose to tacky dirt. This is where weighting the outside peg comes in. By weighting the outside peg you are shifting the CG to the weighted peg side. Since leaning the bike shifts the BIKE’s CG to the inside, weighting the outside peg counteracts that force and moves the bike/rider CG back over the tires which optimizes traction. You weight the peg more or less depending on your speed in the turn and the amount of bike lean.

So the idea is to maintain the bike/rider CG over the point where the tire meets the ground. Saying to weight the outside peg or to keep your body perpendicular to the ground are simpler ways of saying to move the CG over where the tire meets the ground.

When negotiating flat (no berms) or off camber turns it is more important to weight the outside peg since there is nothing to keep the tires from sliding out. Turns with big berms that are taken at high speed require less peg weighting.

I hope this helps.
 

yzguy15

Sprayin tha game
N. Texas SP
Joined
Oct 27, 2000
Messages
1,271
Likes
0
#8
Nice way of explaining it RM Guy. You pretty much said what I said, except explained it a little more in depth.

Might I ask what centrifugal force is? I was wondering if you meant centrifical force and just typed it wrong, or if that is actually a kind of force.
 

RM_guy

Scared of DirtWeek<BR>Club *********
Damn Yankees
Joined
Nov 21, 2000
Messages
6,674
Likes
38
#9
Originally posted by yzguy15
Might I ask what centrifugal force is? I was wondering if you meant centrifical force and just typed it wrong, or if that is actually a kind of force.
Oops:confused:
I spelled it so wrong that the spell checker couldn't even find it.

You're right. I meant centrifical force like the kind that holds you in the rollercoaster car when doing a big loop de loop.
 

High Lord Gomer

Poked with Sticks
Joined
Sep 26, 1999
Messages
11,789
Likes
33
#10
Poor, poor, YT_Guy...even when he's right he doesn't know it. :p

Centrifugal force is the force directed outward during an arcing motion, centripetal force is the force directed inward.
 

RM_guy

Scared of DirtWeek<BR>Club *********
Damn Yankees
Joined
Nov 21, 2000
Messages
6,674
Likes
38
#11
Sorry Gomer. I'm right so often that I loose track:p :p

Actually I thought I made a mistake onetime but I was mistaken:p
 

stormer94

Subscriber
Joined
May 30, 2001
Messages
597
Likes
0
#12
tried it.

Okay, I went riding today for about 5 hours with the kids and some buddies. It seems to me that when you get forward and weight the outside peg you accelerate quicker, which is what it sounded like was gonna happen from those that posted. What I really noticed though was that I could get sideways in the corners and it felt more in control than when I'm not weighting the peg. Still slides out the same distance and angle, but just feels more in control, less likely to slide out all the way and spin out and lay it down.

Does that sound about right?
 

yzguy15

Sprayin tha game
N. Texas SP
Joined
Oct 27, 2000
Messages
1,271
Likes
0
#13
Sounds like you got it to me.
 

will pattison

Sponsoring Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2000
Messages
439
Likes
0
#14
now i know dave is an engineer, too!! :p

it's cool when someone see's the physics, then goes out and turns it into greater enjoyment. whether it's faster lap times or fewer crashes, that's one of the true joys of riding motorcycles.

now that you've got the concept, try fine tuning it with a few additional things: one of the keys to the technique is getting your butt crack over the outside corner of the seat. the other is to drive your outside knee into the radiator shroud, which causes you to also push back on the outside peg a bit. that not only aids in keeping the back end from coming around, but it also helps you keep the upper body as far forward as possible. THAT in turn helps keep the front tire weighted and less likely to low-side. isn't it cool how it's a knee-bone-connected-to-the-thigh-bone kind of thing? when you get it all put together and can roll on steady throttle all the way around an off-camber, it's a truly sweet thing.

good luck and enjoy!!
 

KawieKX125

Subscriber
Joined
Oct 9, 2000
Messages
948
Likes
0
#15
Try an experiment, go through a fast flat sweeper corner. Try it without the weight on he peg, then with. Go as fast as you possiblt can with each untill the tires begin to slide. You will go faster with your weigt on the peg.

On the centrifugal force issue;
My brother took physics this year. The way he explained it to me is that centrifugal force is actually the force that holds you in the turn and that your straight line momentum wants to yank you out. I don't know if this is correct, it is just what I have heard.