Weight when braking-where?

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Jan 12, 2001
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#1
Hi guys:

I am recovering from a endo at the races last weekend, and while I was wondering what happened a lot of questions arised.
The most important one is: where to put weight while braking (I went over the bars when the rear end kicked my butt on a massive braking zone -5th gear straight followed by a tight corner). I have heard that you are supposed to weigh the rear end so the rear brake/tire get more traction, but others have told me that I have to put all my weight over the front tire.
What do you think of this?
I know this is a very basic (d5mb?) question but I´m still learning.

:)
 

High Lord Gomer

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#2
Not a dumb question at all...and a commonly overlooked practice.

One of the first things they taught during the Gary Semics classes was the importance of body positioning. Basically, as far forward as possible during acceleration to counteract wheelieing while allowing full throttle acceleration and as far rearward as possible during braking to allow hard front and rear braking without doing what you did. :)

The instructor, Ike DeJagger, actually moves from hips over the handlebars to butt off the rear fender while riding.

Good luck with your recovery!
 
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#3
THANKS! Gomer

When I crashed I was waaay back over the rear fender but I am sure that I did wrong somethig else.
I am thinking that maybe the suspension setup is wrong, but is working well in other situations, and the bump was track wide so I guess that this was a situation that calls for some other technique.
-Other than flying and landing (gracefully) like a sack of potatoes- HAHA
Maybe the hot move was not to enter too hot...

Thanks again for your answer.
 

High Lord Gomer

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#4
Mister Sack-of-PotatoesMX: :o

Was the front wheel straight when you went OTB (Over The Bars) or did it dig in, twist, turn sideways, then throw you over? If so, a steering damper might have helped.

On some really bad braking bumps, you may actually need to get back on the throttle to sort of "double" into the turn rather than letting the back end kick you too hard.

I can't wait till Wardy gets back...he is the King of "alternate lines". Something he has told me is to try to extreme edges of the track to look for the smooth spots and cut across where everyone else is beating themselves up going through braking and acceleration bumps.

This past weekend during the first set of motos the far inside was smooth going into several corners with bad braking bumps. By the second round of races, apparently too many people found out because it got big bumps, too.
 
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#5
Oh Oh

I was hard on the front brake, but the front wheel didn't dig in.
One of the local geniuses mentioned something about letting off the brakes over the bump and resuming after that, which sounded logical if it were not the end of the track (and any human life) so close to the braking point.
I took note on the alternate line, and yes riding slightly off track would have avoided the problem -but I thought that was foul play-.

I will try this next time (I care more about my butt than the rules).

Also what does mean "riding the rear brake"?

Thanks.
I may be a potato, but what a Flying one! (and the nice landings I do...)
 

agitt73

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#6
riding the rear brake
on the gas and brake at the same time
is my guess
 

Jaybird

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#7
Some like to drag their rear over brakers.
Foul play? Ever watched an Arenacross?
Cutting accross and blocking is Antunez' key to success.