why does KTM not have a contingency program??

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#1
Anyone have a good answer? The big Jap 4 do (I think they all do at least). Gas Gas does.

Why the hell doesn't KTM? I am seriously thinking about racing another bike based on this. Last year I could have paid for my entire season!
 

Jman271

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#3
They have one, it is for pro and select am nationals so unless you are a top ten pro or am, good luck-
www.munnracing.com/cont_proam.htm
 

zio

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#4
Good question. My first though is it's because everybody and their brother is already racing a ktm. They'd be paying out the wazoo. But then that's just immature thinking. A marketer will tell you that you spend more to make more. Just because their brand is winning now doesn't mean they don't want to keep those winners happy and loyal in the future. Building a good reputation for both building good bikes AND supporting your customers is probably their top priority.
 

agitt73

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#6
ktm is a good bike they dont have to pay people (bribe) to ride them
but it would be nice help with entry fees and tires
 

KDXfile

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#7
The reason is that they don't need one. The program is designed to help sell bikes not to help riders. They're not having trouble selling bikes.
Try to find a KTM dealer that pays contigency money.
 

justql

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#8
I know a guy they gave a new bike to for half price since he had won the state series the year before, so my thinking is its all privately done. Nothing is advertised.
 
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#9
I asked myself the same question for the last two years while I rode a KTM and won the 2003 AMA Vet Ammie H&H championship. Of which I recieved squat. Would have meant $1,500 if I would have wised up and bought a Husky earlier. Bought a 2004 Husqvarna TE450, which is hands down a more competitive bike then a 450EXC, and started picking and choosing which contingency races I would enter this year. If you race or care at all about the manufacturers kicking back a little then the decision is simple. I read the comment "they don't because they don't have to". Why would anyone support a company with that attitude?

Thank You,
Travis Epperson
 

Layton

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#10
Dealers usually don't give contingency money, factories do.

Dealers will sponsor individual riders, which help the sale of bikes out of their own shop. Plenty of KTM shops are doing this.

KTM puts most of their money in the professional side of racing. They probably feel they are getting more for their dollar there.
 

KDXfile

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#11
Originally posted by Layton
Dealers usually don't give contingency money, factories do.

No, but they're a few out there that do. You have to shop around. I've been riding a KTM under a "dealer" contingency plan for a year now. Before that, I had a GasGas "dealer" contingency deal coupled with the GGNA plan.
Husky has the best factory plan I've seen.

If you consistently are finishing in the top 3, it's worth it to shop around for a dealer that pays and even better if you can get a factory plan along with it.
 
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#12
buy a husky-they have a most excellent contingency program!coming from a japanese background the bikes are very durable and VERY suited to off-road racing!
 

KaTooMer

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#13
Originally posted by KDXfile
The reason is that they don't need one.
Absolutely. In the Missouri Hare Scambles series, KTM's usually make up around 40% of what I'd consider the more "serious" riders, i.e. the A & B classes. These are the guys who are more likely to buy new bikes fairly often (every 2-3 years, say). Using the final round in '03 (Park Hills) as an example, there were 76 riders in the AA, A, B, Vet, and Senior classes. KTM's made up 28 of those 76, and there were 21 Yamahas (primarily 4-strokes). If not for Yamaha's continued support of off-road, I think you'd see an even higher percentage of KTM's.

The reason is pretty simple: KTM is supplying a need, on a relatively large scale, that other manufacturers (Yamaha excepted) are not, especially with 2-stroke off-road bikes. And they do a pretty good job at it. As long as they keep doing that, they don't need a contingency.
 
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#15
Hey Trajisto, good luck with that Husky! I just got rid of my '04 TE450 because a starter gear stripped in it and an exhaust valve dropped only after about 150 miles on it. Just got a KTM 450EXC and I love it. The Husky is so narrow and tall that there's no way the bike can handle well. The parts availability is horrible for them too. I've spent close to $2,000 already on aftermarket parts for my EXC and I haven't put exhaust on it either. Good luck getting a kick starter too if you don't have one already. It took me 3 months to get mine after being told I would get it 3 weeks after I got the bike.

I will give Husky credit on their contingency because I got $50 from them after finishing 3rd in my class at an enduro.

Don't get me wrong Husky has a quality bike, but as far as my experience with dependability it sucks! The Husky rep is a real jerk too, Rob Keith. Sorry to bad mouth here but, I've got to vent.