1+1 does not always equal 2!

Joined
Mar 16, 2000
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#1
Guys-

I noticed on another thread that discusses shim stacks that the poster had shown two shims of equal diameter and thickness, with a side note that said basically "equals two".

EX: 11 x 0.10
11 x 0.10 (equals a two)

Sorry guys, but it does not! Dont get sucked into thinking that (for
example) that if you want a 0.20 shim in your stack and all you have
is two 10'sthat it's okay and that it's the same thing. It's not...
In fact, I recall finding out that in some instances it can take up to sixty (60!) 0.10 shims to equal one 0.20 shim.

Now, I don't know the math for this and everyone seems to have their own formula anyways. Maybe Jeremy has an answer we can all live with????
 
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Dec 9, 2000
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#2
Servus WhiPit,

In this special case, 11x0.1 seems to be a clamping shim, it doesn't matter because those shims don't bend!

Michael
 
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#3
dre - you are certianly correct and I apologize for my over sight!

Yes, generally sizes of that diameter - anything less than 12mm diameter - the "rule" does not apply. Those sizes are normally used as "bender shims". Meaning that other larger diameter shims bend over those diameters.

So let me rephrase: Example - if you needed 4 24x0.10 shims up against your piston, but only have 2 24x0.20, it isn't the same.

Got it? :D
 

Jeremy Wilkey

Owner, MX-Tech
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#4
Whipit,
I'm at my lap top and don't have the files on this computer. I'll attach to this post later. It's a very simple formula.
Regards,
Jer