daughter is slow to learn

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#1
Help me out girls. My daughter is 12,I bought her a new XR100R to ride she has been riding twice and seems to be having trouble getting started when she lets the clutch out to fast and the bike dies. Any way to help her along .Besides patience.
 
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yzeater

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#2
My dad tought me how to ride an xr100 when i was 13. He had me ride it for two weeks without going out of first gear. Then for two days we worked on smooth starts; slowly let the clutch out, slowly pull gas. Actually, on the xr100, gas isn't needed when you let the clutch out. We did all of this work on a road. Tell me if this works. Just curious, how interested is she in dirtbikes?
 

ktmboy

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#3
I taught my girls to ride an old XR75. Took them to a dirt road that was a little loose, and put 25 lbs. in the back tire (so it would break loose easy). Made them start and stop, start and stop, so they would get both the clutch and brake feel. Got to make sure she's leaning forward too, just in case it hooks up!
 

LoriKTM

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#5
XRs,

Have her hold the clutch in, and roll the throttle on very slightly, and keep it there so she can feel the revs of the bike. Then, have her slowly let out the clutch until she can feel where it starts to pull the bike. Pull the clutch back in, then do it over and over again so she gets used to finding the disengaging point on the clutch. When she's comfortable with that, have her let the clutch out slowly to the disengaging point, and roll on a bit more throttle to get the bike moving, and then let the clutch out all the way. I think the issue is that she needs to understand that the clucth is not an "on-off" switch, that there needs to be a smooth transition to keep from stalling the bike.
 
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#6
I applaud the fact that you are teaching your daughter. Hang in there, it may take more time, but once she gets the hang of it what a great time you two will share for years. Don't forget to also teach her all the mechanical and maintenance details as well. The more she understands about the bike the more she will want to ride. She will also find the time tinkering in the garage with Dad is just about as good as riding. Get her hands greasy and her boots dirty!
 

Rodzilla

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#7
This may not be an answer as it may lead to more problems, but have you tried to goose up the idle speed a bit so it won't stall so easily?

Of course this is assuming that the art of braking has been mastered.
 
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#8
Girls and guys thanks for your answers,I printed them for her. I will try the weight on back tire,she is light. And may try turning the idle up so it is harder for her to kill the engine. I really do appreciate the answers.:D
 

sgr

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#9
Originally posted by smoody
tinkering in the garage with Dad is just about as good as riding
I have to say some of my best memories are working in the garage with my dad!
 
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#10
One other idea that might help, I know my XR is to jumpy to start out in first gear. I actually start out in second its not so jerky. She might actually be a little scared of the bike and the fact of it jerking her around my scare her more. Also if you ride beside her she might not feel as pressured and it could help her see how to do it instead of being shown. The best way I learned was to watch and the try it when no one was looking. It lessens the embarassment when you screw up and fall over or stall so many times your leg hurts and you can't kick anymore. Good Luck and tell her don't give up!!!
 
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#11
I agree with Michelle's suggestion. My daughter had a hard time at first untill I followed the Cindy Gross tips but I went one step further, I suggested to my daughter to not let the clutch all the way out, just let it part of the way out and keep her hand on it. This seemed to make the most sense to her and she immediatley picked up on it and hasn't stalled since.
 
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#12
Patience is the key. If you get impatient, she will sense it and tense up and not do as good. If you get frustrated, she is going to get frustrated. Praise her for every little achievement. Tell her how good she is doing. Encourage her to not give up.

She is a lucky girl to have a dad like you who is willing to teach her how to ride. I wish my dad would have bought me a dirt bike and taught me how to ride.

Good luck & let us know how it's going! :)
 
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#13
I cannot wait til Saturday to go riding with my daughter(Allison)You all have given good suggestions to try. Again,THANKS !:D
 

nkd

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#14
just a little push will help

Hi,

I have taught quite a few beginners to ride and
I let them start moving and if it looks like they
are going to stall I give them a little push. After
awhile they just stop needing it but it definitely
helps in the beginning.

Nancy (AKA Harleygal)