Throttle control on jumps. THIS IS NEW QUESTION

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#1
Okay so like i hear mos to fyou guys talikng about giving throttle on the takeoff jump. So how do i get myself to the point of giving gas on the takeoff instead of being a sissy and letting off, her is an example: rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr --------- rrrrrrrrrrrr. how do i make it a constant rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. HOW do I tell me self to stay on the gas, this is a small jump it is only 4 feet tall. Thank you so much for the help.
 

ktmboy

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#2
Try clicking it up a gear so you're not on the gas as hard while carrying the same speed you would have in the lower gear. In your mind the lower RPMs' will psych you into believing you're not going as fast and the bike won't react violently when you get on it on the face of the jump.
(Advice from another jump sissie!)
 

jboomer

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#3
That's good advice. The sound of the bike has a lot to do with how you ride it. It's really a mental game. If it sounds fast, your mind thinks it really is. Something else you can try: wear earplugs. This will deaden the sound a little and help you to overcome this (as well as protect your hearing).
 

tedkxkdx

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#4
At times the reason people let off is because they do not know how the bike is going to react at the speed/acceleration they are hitting the jump, so they back off and reapply throttle making the sound or feel of the engine something they are accustomed to. Some jumps will throw you over the bars if you are in a gear higher if you hit the ramp and your speed is dropped because you don't have the torque to maintain acceleration up the ramp. Some jumps require a pre-jump and many beginner riders do this via the throttle. Some jumps with big enough faces, say 15ft of face, can be hit with just a slight amount of acceleration occuring but you are either in the bottom of the power band or near the top.
It all boils down to knowing what your engine is going to do ie overrev or sputter. Also how your bike reacts on different steepness and length of the ramp. Very short ramps require a hard acceleration to get the suspension to react to it. Or if your a pro a lot of speed and finesse to jump 50ft from a 3ft high ramp barely 6-7 ft in ramp length. If the speed is not there they just won't make it that far.
So not a concrete answer for all jumps, just a lot of general thoughts.
What is the jump face like you are having troubles with and what is the fear that is making you back off momentarily?
 

merlinnn

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#5
I'm still learning too, and have found that leaving the bike in a higher gear with a steady throttle helps, maybe quarter throttle. This keeps the bike from entering into the powerband to quickly. Obviously this technique doesn't work on all jumps, but it seems very comfortable on small table tops. Once I feel comfortable on a particular jump i then start to slowly roll the throttle on just before the up ramp.

The only way to get rid of that fear is to practice something to you become comfortable with it and begin to enjoy the jump instead of being apprehensive about it. Then you have to move up to the next challenge and start the proccess again.
 
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#6
Speed is only a part of it. For instance, last year I was on a track with a long run at a short double / stepup combo. Just after the landing was a 90 right hander in a berm. I had been hitting the jump in forth but letting off in plenty of time to only make it up on the face of the stepup for fear of over jumping and not making the turn. As the night went on I found myself alone on the track and this is where it got fun. Where I had been taking a long / fast run at the jump and letting off only to not clear it, I began seeing just how short of a run I could take and make the same distance. To my surprise the lees of a run I had at it, the more closer to clearing it I got. Finanlly I started about 10 ft from the face and hit the jump just as I hit 2nd gear and on the gas hard, I was clearing the jump perfectly but only going a fraction of the speed. The momentum of a hard accelleration is the key.

I've learned since that I can control a jump more than I realized by how aggressive I am on the face of the jump. I guess it's like shooting a gun. As the bullet leaves the gun, it's with a lot of force, the same as when you are aggressive on a jump. By letting off and basically coasting a jump you loose momentum quickly just the same as the bullet would after it is in the air a while. (probably a bad scenario :confused: )
 
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#7
Originally posted by tedkxkdx
Some jumps with big enough faces, say 15ft of face, can be hit with just a slight amount of acceleration occuring but you are either in the bottom of the power band or near the top. Very short ramps require a hard acceleration to get the suspension to react to it. Or if your a pro a lot of speed and finesse to jump 50ft from a 3ft high ramp barely 6-7 ft in ramp length. If the speed is not there they just won't make it that far.
This is very true. My practice track has steep jumps with short ramps, 6-8'. I tend to treat these as accelearation or combo accel/velocity jumps, but the big ramp jumps at many tracks are less technical, have an easy transition from flat to ramp, can be jumped with velocity only with a slight blip at takeoff, no hard acceleration, and are more beginner friendly. I found that the key to aggressive acceleration jumps is working up to it, as mentioned above. I used to blip over my easiest double, now I am hard on it in 3rd, which seems easier than high rpm's in 2nd. It is more in the powerband in 3rd and too wound out in 2nd. I find a gear higher is better in most cases, as long as you are not going too fast and bottoming on the ramp, which can cause uncontrolled rebound, not good as you are taking off on a big jump. On the jumps where I need more distance but can't get enough speed I compensate by gassing it harder on the ramp, and in some situations seat bounce too. The best thing has been a lot of practice. I will jump the same one 50+ times in a row to ingrain the body position and throttle position into my riding technique so it comes naturally. Then the next time I see a similar jump it all comes naturally.
 

linusb

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#8
That was a good explanation Jeff. Gomer was basically showing me the same thing at a practice table top at TNT. He was able to clear a 40-50' tabletop in first gear, with a very short run where I was having trouble in 3rd with a long approach.

I have the same basic dilemma as MaxKliks...letting off before the face. I have a fear of looping out in the air which is why I do it. I just need more practice accelerating harder up the face so I can figure out how to position my body so I don't loop out.
 

High Lord Gomer

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#9
It's all about commitment! Why can't you guys just *COMMIT*?!?

(Oh, and put the seat back down, too, will ya?)
 

linusb

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#10
Now you sound like my wife, circa 1993.

Seriously, I just don't have the confidence. Yesterday for example, I was trying to do the set of jumps that are the second from the back row (the one where I crashed last time). Several times, I came out of the turn, tried to accelerate hard and on that first little jump ended up coming down almost vertical with my front wheel straight up in the air. I thought for sure I was going to crash on my back. It's foul up's like that which keep me from commiting any more. I thought it was my body positioning so the next time I did it I made sure to be far forward but the front end still came up on me. I was in 2nd gear, maybe I should have tried 3rd. Are you sure you aren't chopping the throttle at all just as you leave the lip of the jump?
 
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#11
I find that on some of the smaller jumps (shorter) it's easier for me to remain seated up the face and stand with head over bars just as the front wheel leaves the ground. I gotta warn you that it'll bring the front end down rather quickly so I recommend taking it easy at 1st.
 
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#12
Yes, the seat bounce or variations can put you on your head fast, with the extra rear suspension rebound affect.

Try gripping a little more with the legs on takeoff, and rowing the bars toward your chest on the takeoff ramp, which keeps your body vertical, then push down on the bars upon takeoff. This should get the front end down even if you are hard on it at takeoff.
 

High Lord Gomer

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#14
Originally posted by linusb
Several times, I came out of the turn, tried to accelerate hard and on that first little jump ended up coming down almost vertical with my front wheel straight up in the air.
The same thing happens to me on that one.  I stay on the seat for that one (in 2nd) to get the rear to rebound a little more.  Even then it still often lands with the front up.

The thing you really have to be careful of when staying on the seat is that you have to stay on the gas hard.  If you back off the gas a hair while still on the seat, it is pretty much guaranteed to land you on the front fender.

That jump has gotten kind of worn down and it would probably be best to swing as wide as possible beforehand, and you're right, 3rd would keep the front lower, too.