Wheelies

a454elk

Mexicutioner
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#1
Definately check your shock settings and your spring. You should start from stock settings and go from there. The bike should have about a 3 inch drop at the rear when seated on it, that will give you a good start for the rear spring. 2 strokers are usually off at idle but pick up after mid. I put a pipe, silencer and rejetted the carb to match the new pipe and it really picked up the low end. It's alot different than riding a 4 stroke for sure, the power is usually not right off idle but kicks in later and causes wheel spin. Just sit back and roll it on, that''ll bring up the front! Good luck
 

Hucker

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#3
Originally posted by monkeybutt
Or,just buy a 500.
Now there's a well thought out response. Do us a favor think before you answer....
 

High Lord Gomer

Poked with Sticks
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#4
I could be wrong, but I thought I had heard that 90-100 mm of race sag was desirable for most modern full size bikes. That would come out to 3 1/2 to 4 inches.
 
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#5
Why???

Whats wrong?. You cant lift the front end on a 250. Man i can wheelie any size of bike. It's not the bike it's mostly the rider.

Originally posted by monkeybutt
Or,just buy a 500.
:eek:
 
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#6
Originally posted by cr125_king
Whats wrong?. You cant lift the front end on a 250. Man i can wheelie any size of bike. It's not the bike it's mostly the rider.
See HUCKER (above) for an appropriate response


Now getting down to business,

To control a wheelie (once you've got it up), do you:

Have your hand ready on the clutch?
Your foot ready on the rear brake?

Or what?
 

Jaybird

Apprentice Goon
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#7
Once you have it up, you need to be in a centered position. If you start to go over, the clutch can stop the energy that is causing you to go over, but the momentum may not stop until you hit that back brake. I'd say in that situation, grab for both and hope for the best! :eek:
 
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#8
Hope this helps

Once you get it up have your foot by(or ready) to tap the back brake just incase you start to go over. I did this while i was learing, but now i dont use it(the odd time i do). You dont have to have your hand by the clutch, that aint going to do anything while your wheeling. I dont even use the clutch to start a wheelie. My lastest thing i've been practicing is i start my wheelie out in first gear and go through all the gears to fifth and keep going.



Originally posted by CrustyNoodle





Now getting down to business,

To control a wheelie (once you've got it up), do you:

Have your hand ready on the clutch?
Your foot ready on the rear brake?

Or what?
:)
 

Saratoga

#9
You can raise the front end with power or by carefully dumping the clutch. Using the clutch enables you to launch the wheelie almost at a dead stop. Once up, you do not have to necessarily gain speed. You can do a balanced wheelie and maintain a slow speed. Using the rear brake is important. Dont learn the hard way.

My buddy is so good at this that in Mexico he starts at one end of the town and wheeliies all the way to the other end. He turns around and comes back through. Even the Federalies will clap for him. We hate those guys though.
 
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#10
Thank's for the advice guy's - that's just what I was looking for.

I'm going out on Sunday to test out your theories so wish me luck! I'll report back if it all goes according to plan (read: if I'm still conscious).

:silly:
 
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#11
Your right about carfully dumping the clutch on slow wheelies>my brother dumps the clutch hard and all he gets is wheel spin, and he wonders why he can wheelie. I dont reccomend practicing slow wheelies for begginers because of the balance issue. I find the faster you go the easier it is. My dad had a friend like you mentioned to. He could wheelie all over this town and then turn around. This guy was a phyco rider(excellent) , and he could of gone places if he would of stayed with it, but he got into the drugs . Check the one pict of me doing a 5th gear wheelie on my picts in my signature.


Originally posted by Saratoga
You can raise the front end with power or by carefully dumping the clutch. Using the clutch enables you to launch the wheelie almost at a dead stop. Once up, you do not have to necessarily gain speed. You can do a balanced wheelie and maintain a slow speed. Using the rear brake is important. Dont learn the hard way.

My buddy is so good at this that in Mexico he starts at one end of the town and wheeliies all the way to the other end. He turns around and comes back through. Even the Federalies will clap for him. We hate those guys though.
 

LoP

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#12
I like the 500 answer LoL

I rode a cr250 for years and had a hell of a time getting the front wheel up while in the dirt....bought a 500 and 90% of my riding has been on one wheel!! whehter I like it or not...

KJ:scream:
 
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#13
what!

How can you have a hard time getting the front end to come up on A cr250. I have a hell of time trying to keep the front end down on my CR250. You think it's hard on a 250 then try wheeling a 125.

Originally posted by LoP
I rode a cr250 for years and had a hell of a time getting the front wheel up while in the dirt....bought a 500 and 90% of my riding has been on one wheel!! whehter I like it or not...

KJ:scream: